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Nov
25
2010

Articles About land use

  • Land trust garners praise

    Tecumseh Land Trust’s Associate Director, Michele Burns, met with federal Farm and Ranch Land Protection Program Director Mark Rose, left, and Matt Harbage, the program’s state manager. TLT received more funds from the federal agency in 2010 than any other land trust in the state. (photo by Megan Bachman)

    The director of the largest federal funding source for farmland preservation stopped in Yellow Springs last week to visit Ohio’s top recipient of federal funding, the Tecumseh Land Trust, which he praised as one of the nation’s top land trusts.

  • Stutzman’s land for lease

    The 20-acre plot of Village-owned land on U.S. 68 North that formerly housed Stutzman’s Garden and Landscaping Center will be available for rent within a few months, according to Village Council at its June 7 meeting.

  • Affordable Housing Expert Promotes Land Trust Model

    National affordable housing leader John Emmeus Davis of Burlington, Vermont with Marianne MacQueen of Yellow Springs Home, Inc., who partnered with the Village of Yellow Springs to bring Davis to town. Davis discussed affordable housing issues with a small group of citizens on Monday morning. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    John Emmeus Davis of the Champlain Housing Trust in Burlington, Vermont met with a group of community members Monday morning to promote community land trusts as a way to acheive affordable housing in Yellow Springs.

  • Land trust guest speaker advises sustainable farming

    David Montgomery

    Professor and author David Montgomery thinks everyone should be concerned about where their food comes from and how its grown. In his presentation for the Tecumseh Land Trust’s “Stories of People and the Land” series on Tuesday night, the soil expert urged no-till, organic farming practices that preserve local agricultural soils rather than deplete them.

  • Village Station gets approval

    At its April 12 meeting Village Planning Commission renewed a conditional use permit for a commercial and residential development at 150 Railroad Street at the corner of Dayton Street that had been dormant for nearly three years.

  • Dog park slated for Ellis Park

    With a crowd of about 70 people gathered on Monday, March 15, to hear about the fate of the village’s first bark park, Village Council members approved 4–1 a resolution to support a dog park at Ellis Park. Council requested that the group pursuing the dog park should consult the Tree Committee, whose members have spent over 20 years cultivating a scenic park at the Ellis Park location.

  • Green space funds go to Jacoby farm preservation

    At their March 1 meeting, members of Yellow Springs Village Council unanimously approved contributing to the preservation of two farm properties, one of which includes the headwaters of the Jacoby Creek and is the first farm preserved within the Jacoby greenbelt.

  • Council moves towards funding Jacoby easement

    At its Feb. 16 meeting, Village Council took a first step toward using Village greenbelt funds to conserve two pieces of farmland considered critical by Tecumseh Land Trust, or TLT. One of the properties is the first piece of the Jacoby greenbelt to be officially preserved as farmland.

  • Business park’s widened road elicits concern

    The Village of Yellow Springs is considering a plan to create a new entrance off Dayton-Yellow Springs Road directly into the Center for Business and Education (CBE), the new business park created by Community Resources on the west edge of the village. Though the authority to approve the intersection rests with the Greene County Engineer, Village Council will discuss the proposal when the park, which was annexed into the village in 2005, comes up for approval as a subdivision later this year.

  • TLT celebrates 20 years with stories of the land

    From the middle of a field, the land looks different than the view from the road. Seen from the land owner’s perspective, the way the growers see it, one can just begin to understand what the birds and foxes see — open space without borders. That is also perhaps the way that painters and poets see the land when they articulate why it is so loved and valued.

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