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FROM THE PRINT EDITION, 2012

This page contains links to previous years of articles published in the 2012 print edition of the Yellow Springs News. Click on the link below to jump to a specific year.

Follow this link to find pre-2010 archives.
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2012


December 27, 2012
December 20, 2012
  • A sweet tradition continues
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    Last week Village Council member Gerry Simms received holiday baking staples from Village employee Chris Hamilton as part of the legacy of ex-slave Wheeling Gaunt, which mandates that the Village provide flour and sugar to all local widows and widowers.

  • To new healer, the eyes have it
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    Some see eyes as windows to the soul, while others, like local iridologist Eric Rodriguez, also see the iris as a window into the body, revealing a person’s health history, unhealthy habits and future illnesses.

  • State funds Antioch co-ops
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    Following through on its commitment to agricultural and environmental sustainability in both campus life and curriculum, Antioch College last week cemented a partnership with the state to establish several dozen cooperative job positions for students

  • Moments that make our community
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    For our annual holiday story, the News staff asked villagers to describe a 2012 “Yellow Springs moment,” that is, a time when they felt an especially strong sense of community in the village

  • Food ties village to Ethiopia
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    Yellow Springer Andy Carlson recalls with fondness his childhood home in Ethiopia. Growing up with missionary parents in the eastern part of the country, Carlson lived in a colonial Italian mansion that, he remembers, “had a fabulous garden. There were lemon trees, banana trees, all kinds of things.” So he was surprised when, during a trip to Ethiopia decades later, he was unable to find seeds.

  • Elf-guided tour
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    Penny Adamson, left, and Emily Seibel were enthusiastic participants in last week-end’s Elf Tour, sponsored by the Chamber of Commerce.

  • Transfer ‘celebratory’ for college
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    The recent agreement between Antioch College and Antioch University that nullifies the university’s remaining claims to the college campus will allow the college to move ahead with projects that also benefit the Yellow Springs community.

  • In college, YSHS soccer stars shine
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    Kyle Buchwalder, a 2008 Yellow Springs High School graduate and senior midfielder for Colorado College, has been selected to a second team spot on the Capital One Academic All-America Team for the second year in a row. He is one of several formerYSHS soccer players who are continuing to reap honors in college athletics.

  • Schools offer drug counseling
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    At its meeting on Dec. 13, the Yellow Springs school board agreed to contract with Greene County’s TCN Behavioral Health Services for substance abuse prevention and treatment services for students in the school.

December 13, 2012
  • Finders, seekers
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    About 40 local children took part in a scavenger hunt downtown last Saturday, part of the Holiday in the Village activities.

  • Norah’s no longer open, for now
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    Starting Friday, Norah Byrnes voluntarily stopped serving breakfast in her home. According to officials, complaints about the activity in the home over the past year caused regulators to become aware that Byrnes may be operating outside zoning regulations.

  • Zoning effectiveness a concern
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    While Council and Planning Commission officials and Technical Review Committee members applauded the proposed zoning code draft for its new clarity and usability, several raised concerns that the revised code could end up making local development less likely, rather than more.

  • WYSO, college are reunited
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    Antioch College will get back its longtime local radio station WYSO as part of a tentative agreement approved this week with Antioch University, which had retained control of the FM station when the College was purchased by alumni in 2009.

  • Glen both source, subject for poets
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    This Friday, Dec. 14, the Yellow Springs community is invited to celebrate the Glen at “In the Spirit of the Glen: A night of nature-inspired poetry.” Eighteen poets will share their original nature-inspired work, and an open mic will also be available.

  • Potters’ urn honors a tiny, brief life
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    Three Yellow Springs potters were commissioned to create a memorial urn for baby Hope and spent six weeks designing and crafting her final resting place.

  • Local author SJ Drum­— Glen inspires supernatural tale
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    Area author S.J. Drum re-imagines the village as a place for the paranormal in her book, Surprisingly Supernatural, published by Eternal Press in August. And the depiction is not too far off.

  • Medieval plays tap a new root
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    “Return to the Garden: A Ceremony for the New Time” will be presented Saturday, Dec. 22, the evening of the solstice, at 7 p.m. in Westminster Hall at the First Presbyterian Church.

December 6, 2012
  • Village Council snagged on public arts policy
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    Village Council discussed the Village public arts policy once again at their meeting on Monday, Dec. 3. Council veered toward the draft recommended by Village Manager Laura Curliss, that included a two-phase approval process for all art installations in public spaces.

  • Mills Lawn kids tip hats to 1940s
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    The silly laughs and sensational songs heard on 1940s radio will be re-performed live in the Mills Lawn biennial all-school musical, The Albert Brown Show, featuring some of the era’s comedy routines, music and dance numbers and celebrity knockoffs.

  • Village planner’s job to end
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    After seven years as the face of all things related to public planning and development in the village, Ed Amrhein is leaving his position as assistant Village planner. His last day will be Friday, Dec. 14.

  • Villagers share the holiday spirit
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    What began more than 20 years ago with a small group of local volunteers collecting fruit baskets for low-income families has evolved into a program—Share the Joy—whereby struggling families in Yellow Springs can request essential gifts for themselves and their children.

  • Energy efficiency within reach
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    When Pat Murphy came to Yellow Springs in 2003, he said he could build a house that operated with 50 percent less fossil fuels than a conventional home, but his partner, Faith Morgan, didn’t believe him. Now, 10 years later, the couple is wrapping up a new film about homes built in Yellow Springs and around the country that use 90 percent less energy to heat and cool than conventional dwellings.

  • Roadside read
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    On Sunday Regina Brecha and Max Mullin restocked the Mullin family’s Little Free Library on State Route 370.

November 29, 2012
  • Let furniture rise from the ashes
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    The coming decimation of the village’s ash tree population by an invasive Asian beetle — a kind of “Arborgeddon” for a tree that represents about one out of every 10 in our canopy — is a dismal story. Many beloved trees — on Mills Lawn, at the Antioch College campus, in the Glen — have already died. Others are showing signs of stress.

  • Council plans budget hearing
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    Village Council convened one last budget workshop last week before the first official public hearing on the budget takes place on Monday, Dec. 3, at the Bryan Center in Council chambers. Council plans to approve the budget in early January, much earlier than it has done in the recent past.

  • Antioch University Midwest—Budget darkens union talk
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    Antioch University Midwest has hit difficult financial times, and the reality is affecting the local campus in several ways. This month Midwest leaders told the school community that they planned to cut $208,000 in personnel costs by the end of this year. Midwest did not specify where the cuts would come from, but indicated that the campus needed to find ways to stem a rising deficit caused by low enrollment over the last several years.

  • Students sail by state exam
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    By design of the evaluation tool, the Yellow Springs school district fell this year from “excellent with distinction” to just “excellent” in its quality designation on the State of Ohio report card. But the apparent reduction in status was merely a technical result of the State’s metrics, as the district received exactly the same student-wide achievement score as last year, when it was labeled “excellent with distinction” for the second consecutive year.

  • Bahnsen’s photos as art, digitized
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    It was a small gallery on Glen Street. But inside was a trove of artistic images produced through the lens of one of the pioneers of impressionistic photography. The artist was the late Axel Bahnsen.

  • Council is the public’s forum
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    A small village with an active citizenry and lots of public services makes for a busy Village Council. To alleviate some of the burden and engage the expertise of a talented populace, Council has historically relied on commissions to vet ideas and research policies before making an official decision on a given issue.

  • In Israel, Rothman chooses peace
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    Yellow Springs’ Mori Rothman, refuse to serve as a matter of conscience.
    On Oct. 24, Rothman, a former Yellow Springs resident, was jailed for refusing to serve in the IDF. Rothman served two consecutive 10-day prison terms and was released on Nov. 14.

    Sports

    November 22, 2012
    • Support for YS schools unique
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      Tuesday, Nov. 6, was a good day for progressive voters. But throughout the Miami Valley, it was a bad night for one of the biggest progressive issues of our time: public education.

    • Making dough
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      The fourth-grade class at Mills Lawn school proudly presented a check to the Yellow Springs Food Bank this week for $182.92. (Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    • Village’s own battery park
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      The owners of electric cars may soon have a place to recharge their vehicles in Yellow Springs if the Village moves ahead with the installation of a charging station in the downtown vicinity.

    • One year later, YSI is set to grow
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      In its first year under new ownership, YSI Incorporated has continued double-digit revenue growth, added local jobs and launched two major new product lines from its Yellow Springs facility.

    • Growing church is just the beginning
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      Newly appointed Pastor Bill Randolph’s enthusiasm for the Lord — and reviving the historic local church — is welcome news to its parishioners.

      Sports

      November 15, 2012
      • Studio art tour helps promote town’s renown
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        The Yellow Springs Artist Studio Tour was held this year on Oct. 20 and Oct. 21 and featured 27 artists spread across eight studios in and around the village.

      • Village CF bulb giveaway
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        Thousands of compact fluorescent light bulbs will be given away this week as part of a village-funded energy-efficiency program.

      • Police help keep kids warm
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        Next week, Yellow Springs police officers will take a group of local youth to the Mall at Fairfield Commons to buy them coats, hats, gloves and shoes.

      • Online model broadens access to AU courses
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        School these days doesn’t always involve a classroom of students or even a building to house them. But learning can still take place without place, over the cables and waves of the internet.

      • Online model broadens access to AU courses
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        School these days doesn’t always involve a classroom of students or even a building to house them. But learning can still take place without place, over the cables and waves of the internet. That’s the concept Antioch University bet on this month when it contracted with online content provider Coursera to offer Antioch credit to students taking classes online.

      • Spirit in the wood
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        Greg Ackers, a mural artist and sculptor from Delaware, Ohio, is about 40 hours into a rendering of snow owls, a dog and feathers from a massive tree stump.

        Sports

        November 8, 2012
        • Hempfling to leave Council
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          Due to what she said was an increasing demand on her personal time, Village Council President Judith Hempfling announced that she planned to leave Council before the end of her current term. Hempfling said she would resign once the Village approved the final draft of the zoning code revision, likely sometime in January.

        • College commits to 250 by 2016
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          This fall Antioch College campus is buzzing with activity as its more than 100 students settle into the daily rhythms of campus life. By 2016, the number of students could grow to 250 if a plan adopted by the Antioch College Board of Trustees is realized.

        • Council moves on public art
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          Village Council members discussed the first draft of its first ever public art policy at their meeting Monday, Nov. 5. The policy, drafted by Village Manager Laura Curliss, covers the principles and procedures the Village will use to accept both permanent and temporary installations of art in Village-owned spaces.

        • Pettiford new police chief
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          When village resident Tony Pettiford takes over as Yellow Springs police chief on Nov. 19, he will bring a deep knowledge of the community he has called home for 51 years, which he says will serve him well in his effort to keep Yellow Springs safe.

        • New documentary by Aileen LeBlanc—Ethiopian Jews seek spiritual home
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          On Nov. 21, 1984, a squadron of Israeli airliners, dubbed Operation Moses, landed in famine stricken Sudan and evacuated 8,000 Ethiopian Jewish refugees to Israel. Seven years later, in a follow-up 36-hour mission — Operation Solomon — 34 Israeli cargo planes and airliners landed in Ethiopia and airlifted an additional 14,000 Ethiopian Jews to the Promised Land

        November 1, 2012
        • Ohio premiere of ‘Sparkle’
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          To be a dancer with an African-American dance company in the Midwest is not your everyday occupation. To also be 49 and still performing with that company is astonishing. To have suffered a critical injury and attempt to come back at that age, with that company, is the gripping story of Dayton Contemporary Dance Company’s Sheri “Sparkle” Williams. A short film, “Sparkle,” by local filmmakers Julia Reichert and Steve Bognar, will have its Ohio premiere in Dayton this week.

        • Ryan rallies local support at dairy
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          It was a little overcast and a bit blustery. But that didn’t stop more than 2,000 supporters from showing up at last Saturday’s Paul Ryan rally at Young’s Jersey Dairy. And a number of the Republican vice-presidential candidate’s supporters hailed from Yellow Springs.

        • YSHS fall play picks up the pieces
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          This year’s fall play at Yellow Springs High School has been full of drama with an unscripted denouement. Plagued by chronic absences and a slew of actors dropping out, three weeks into rehearsals for Arthur Miller’s The Crucible, the production was scrapped.

        • Canvassers blow in from the West
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          A group of Northern California Democrats left 80-degree weather to brave the cold, November winds of Ohio in hopes of pushing the swing state further left this election. On Monday the four Californians, members of the West Yolo Democratic Club, warmed up at the Emporium before heading out to canvas for Yellow Springs congressional candidate Sharen Neuhardt in Fairborn in 40-degree blistery cold. But they seemed to be more focused on the winds of political change.

        • Drafting the Village budget— Early numbers on target
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          The Village of Yellow Springs came to its budget process early this year, and happily too, with most funds coming in close to budget and a sizable cash carry-over to pad the operation. With several more workshops planned for Village Council meetings on Nov. 5 and 23 and Dec. 5, the Village plans to get the coming year’s budget passed by early 2013.

        • Senior Center director resigns
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          Yellow Springs Senior Center Director David Scott resigned his position on Oct. 31 after two years at the helm of the organization, citing personality differences between himself and the board of trustees. Scott, 63, said he plans to remain in Yellow Springs and enjoy his retirement spending time with his 95-year-old mother and walking his dog, Suzette.

        October 25, 2012
        • Comedy, satire and the absurd in 10-min. bits
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          Ann Boleyn, fleeting dreams, Russian gangsters, and a touch of Monty Python will be on stage this weekend at the First Presbyterian Church.

        • State of the college address— College is ‘coming alive’
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          If 2010, the year the College restarted after closure, was “daunting but doable,” and 2011 when it welcomed its first class was “[we’re] all in,” then this year the thrust on campus is “coming alive,” Antioch College President Mark Roosevelt said.

        • Schools justify new levy
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          Local voters will decide on Nov. 6 whether to approve a property tax increase for the Yellow Springs School District.

        • Rededication honors Vernet
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          It’s been a long time coming — and a bit of a mess. But this weekend the public will have the opportunity to see firsthand an investment that was well worth the wait.

        • Elders recall a more diverse era
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          The complicated history of race relations in town and the significant role African Americans have played in the making of Yellow Springs will be addressed at a forum on Monday, Oct. 29, from 7 to 9 p.m. at Antioch University Midwest.

        • Village buys Railroad Street lot
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          Thirty-five people gathered around the gravel lot to witness the the auction of the property at the corner of Railroad and Dayton streets. After a short bidding process, the Village of Yellow Springs had purchased the property for $170,000.

        October 18, 2012
        • School forecasts lack of funds
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          The latest five-year budget forecast presented at the school board meeting Thursday, Oct. 4, continued to show that the district is still facing financial woes.

        • Future first responders
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          Kian and Neirin Barker were among the villagers who attended the MTFR open house last week.

        • Views from the street— How presidential were candidates?
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          The News asked Yellow Springs residents to weigh in on the first presidential debate held on Oct. 3 in Denver, and the vice presidential debate held in Danville, Ky., on Oct. 11.

        • Iona pushes vintage clothes
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          At a new local clothing boutique, you might find jazz-era dresses next to Elvis Presley-inspired bowler shirts, Ramones-influenced punk rock attire among glam rock skinny jeans.

        • Californian finds village novel
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          Originally from Jackson, Calif., Jillian Slater moved to Dayton in January, 2011. Whenever she told people she was from California, they would invariably reply “I bet you would like Yellow Springs.”

        • Village OKs bidding on lot
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          The Railroad Street property where the grain elevator once stood is going to auction this week, and the Village of Yellow Springs will be among the bidders.

        • Council eyes public art policy
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          Village Council considered a draft art policy at its Oct. 15 meeting as a first step towards defining the types of art allowed in public spaces and the procedures for their approval.

        October 11, 2012
        • Scenes from the street
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          Scenes from the street: Fall Street Fair 2012

        • New class to continue shaping college
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          Meredith Martin is one of a new crop of Antioch College students, a cohort 75-strong composed of enthusiastic young people who arrived on campus last week ready to remake the college, which reopened last year.

        • Yellow Springs Artists Studio Tour — Art and the artist on display
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          The once-a-year chance to peek inside a local artist’s studio and discover their process draws some of the biggest art-loving crowds to Yellow Springs each October.

        • Women’s shelter started in Yellow Springs
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          Local resident Susan Stiles helped found the Family Violence Prevention Center — informally known as the Xenia Women’s Shelter — in Greene County in 1979. Then it was called the Greene County Domestic Violence Project. It was initially located in a couple of different locations in Yellow Springs.

        • Rollin’, rollin’, rollin’…
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          Brigid and Conner Digiacomo, ages 6 and 8, of Beavercreek were told to find a pumpkin they could carry to the car. They did their best to find ones that rolled instead.

        • Village to consider bidding on land parcel downtown
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          The Village Station development that has been hanging on as a concept plan for office and retail space at the corner of Dayton and Railroad Streets is all but quashed. But an opportunity for a new idea may be coming soon.

        • Zoning plans for an eclectic town
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          The Yellow Springs zoning code has been viewed as cumbersome and expensive to approve, and is currently in the midst of an overhaul.

        • Methodists celebrate 175 years
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          It was the year Martin Van Buren became the eighth president of the United States. Two months after his inauguration, New York City’s major banks failed, igniting the “Panic of 1837.” And in that same year, right here in Yellow Springs, the United Methodist Church held its first meetings.

        October 4, 2012
        • Local man seeks change in Ohio
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          Being a Yellow Springer, and a long shot, Democratic candidate Jeff Robertson’s run for the Ohio Senate — an ambitious undertaking in a Republican-leaning district — is anything but conventional. At a campaign fundraiser at The Winds Cafe this week, Robertson eschewed a tie, served an all-vegetarian meal, spent more time reading from his recently published political thriller than stumping, and seemed more interested in raising awareness than raising money.

        • Education film to honor Wallis
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          For 90 years the Antioch School has been an alternative educational option for local children. But what if the Yellow Springs public schools could become more like the Antioch School?

        • Villagers query chiefs-to-be
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          If he is appointed police chief, candidate Tony Pettiford said he will work alongside his officers and be actively involved in the day-to-day policing of the community. If he is named police chief, candidate Art Scott said he will make sure officers and staff receive the training they need to be a top-notch police department.

        • Kennedy’s near century of life, trees
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          Lloyd Kennedy isn’t one to revel in the spotlight. Especially at an event like last Friday’s ceremony that rededicated Ellis Park as the Ellis Park and Lloyd Kennedy Arboretum.

        • Village Council— CBE federal grants reduced
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          The Village of Yellow Springs learned this week that federal grant funds that have long been committed for road construction within the Village commerce park have been withdrawn. A federal earmark of $344,000 that was committed through the Ohio Department of Transportation for roads at the Village’s Center for Busines and Education was redirected last month to another project. The loss of funding cuts the CBE’s infrastructure budget by over 20 percent.

        September 27, 2012
        • Solar panels generate discussion— Net metering rates debated
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          On bright, sunny days, the electric meter at Harvey and Ruth Paige’s Meadow Lane residence spins backwards, thanks to solar photovoltaic array mounted in their backyard.

        • Wright State professor Opolot Okia— Reexaming slavery
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          In certain eras, it has perhaps been easier to say that slavery and forced labor are wrong than to live that principle.

        • Pining for a greener forest
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          The Glen’s pine forest wasn’t all that big — less than 50 acres. For runners, bird watchers, and weekend trekkers it was a delightful destination. But the forest is disappearing, and it’s not the result of global warming, logging, or pollution.

        • When teaching is as fun as jamming
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          Oliver Simons and Zac Fenton were 11 years old when they started their first rock band. The experience was seminal, and since then music has been their life. Now they are passing on their skills, and their passion,

        • Village police to bulk up slim staff
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          The Yellow Springs Police Department typically fields a team of eight full-time and a half dozen part-time officers. Currently, there are six full-time officers and less than three active part-time officers, many of whom are being stretched to their limit and are often asked to cover shifts alone.

        • Not two-tired…
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          The Antioch School held its recently-revived Anything On Wheels fundraising event Sept. 23.

        September 20, 2012
        • Lawson gardens, fracking ban— Council reaches for authority
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          Several Village Council members expressed regret during their meeting on Monday, Sept. 17, that they have not found a way to preserve all the gardens at the Lawson Place residences. Earlier in the month the Village had drafted an ordinance requiring a permit to remove the private landscaping that property owner Greene Metropolitan Housing Authority says must be removed by Oct. 1.

        • Oh, the places they’ve gone!
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          Rwanda, Lithuania, Panama, China. What do these countries have in common? They’re all places Yellow Springers visited this past summer, many taking trips that combined vacation with work or educational opportunities. The stories they returned with provide tiny windows on the world outside the village.

        • Police chief search narrows
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          In its search for a permanent chief of police, the Village of Yellow Springs has narrowed its options to three candidates, including current Interim Chief Arthur Scott, Central State University Police Chief Anthony Pettiford, and John Milstead, security manager for Dayton Metro Libraries. The Village is currently scheduling visits to the village for each of the candidates and will host a public forum with each of the candidates on Wednesday, Sept. 26, from 6:30 to 9 p.m. at the Bryan Center.

        • A weekend of Wellness awaits
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          In the late 1800s, Yellow Springs was a mecca for health and wellness as far-flung visitors flocked to the village to soak in the mineral-rich waters of the Yellow Spring. With hopes of re-igniting regional interest in the town’s alternative therapies, holistic health practitioners and artists have teamed up to put on this weekend’s Wellness Experience.

        • Healing with ancient ways
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          Virgil Mayor Apostol tends to get on people’s nerves. The holistic health practitioner treats his patients’ nervous system using traditional Filipino healing techniques like pulling, stretching, pressure and joint mobilization, and in so doing can help them heal from injury, chronic pain or work-related impairments.

        September 13, 2012
        • Jenkins honored for rehab work
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          Alyce Earl Jenkins may have stumbled by accident into the nascent field of rehabilitation counseling in the mid-1960s, but it was no accident how much this longtime villager contributed to the discipline over a distinguished four-decade career. For that work, which focused on helping those with physical and mental disabilities find work, she will be inducted into the Greene County Women’s Hall of Fame this month.

        • An eye on arts, crafts at Cyclops
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          Organizers of Cyclops Fest, returning this weekend for its second year, like to compare their handmade fair to a farmers’ market. At both, patrons buy high quality goods that are locally and lovingly hand-produced directly from those who labored to make them — only instead of heirloom tomatoes, Cyclops patrons can purchase jewelry, apparel, handbags, paper goods, bath products and more.

        • Neuhardt’s American Dream
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          Sharen Neuhardt knows a thing or two about the American Dream.
          The Yellow Springs business attorney, who is running for Ohio’s newly formed 10th district seat in the U.S. House of Representatives, understands just how much her middle class roots contributed to her success.

        • Barr to go the way of mill?
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          Jim Hammond, who saved the Grinnell Mill from almost certain demise, has brought his interest in historic properties closer to the village. Last week he and his wife Libby Hammond purchased the Barr property from Friends Care Community. The sale closed on Friday.

        • What’s the buzz about the bugs?
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          Though it is a source of some chagrin to him, the cultural reference that most immediately represents the business Glen Courtright has created here in the village is Disney’s 1994 classic The Lion King. Specifically pertinent is the part in the film when the lion, the warthog and the meerkat feast on a cornucopia of bugs while singing their “problem-free philosophy.”

        September 6, 2012
        • Attorney Ellis Jacobs wins victory for early voting rights
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          Ellis Jacobs wants to make sure every Ohioan’s vote counts. The villager, as founder and coordinator for the Miami Valley Voter Protection Coalition, has fought the legislative attempts to restrict voting that have escalated in Ohio in recent years. Last week, his cause scored a major victory when a federal court struck down an Ohio law restricting early voting on the weekend and Monday before the election.

        • At Mills Lawn, inquiry is king
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          The new buzzword in the Yellow Springs School District this school year is “inquiry-based learning,” and at Mills Lawn Elementary School the effort to guide learning around student interest and problem-solving is already under way.

        • Teachers aim for big ideas
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          Every six seconds a child somewhere in the world dies from hunger. Leaders hunger for power, scholars hunger for knowledge, and demonstrators hunger to make statements about change. And everyone, big and small, hungers for love. Hunger is a big word, and its many iterations are the theme of this year’s McKinney School and Yellow Springs High School experience.

        • New teachers at McKinney, YSHS
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          Brandon Lowry, Nancy Beers, Karleen Materne and Cameron McCoy

        • Streetscape to be implemented in two stages
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          At their Sept. 4 meeting, members of Village Council voted unanimously to move ahead with a gradual process for improving the downtown streetscape. The initial phase of the project, planned for this fall, is aimed at fixing the sidewalks deemed most dangerous and removing the street trees causing the most sidewalk damage.

        • Change afoot in credit union leadership
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          Last month the YS Federal Credit Union saw two sudden personnel changes. On July 26, Chief Executive Officer Karen Wolf resigned from a position she had held for 12 years. That same day, Sandy Hollenberg, then chief operating officer, became the interim CEO of the credit union.

        August 30, 2012
        • Council urged to address ash infestation
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          The Emerald Ash Borer has arrived in Yellow Springs, and ash trees are dying. But just standing by as they die is not the only option, according to biologist Don Cipollini, who spoke to Village Council at Council’s Aug. 20 meeting.

        • Lawson gardens are still at risk
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          Marilyn Van Eaton began seeding a garden at her Lawson Place public housing unit 17 years ago. When she learned in June that the local housing authority would tear out most of her garden, she was stunned and saddened.

        • Barr property housing plans dissolve
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          Buckeye Community Hope Foundation this week released its option to purchase the Barr property on the corner of Xenia Avenue and Limestone Street.

        August 23, 2012
          Sports

            Obituaries

            August 16, 2012
            • West Nile virus in Village
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              Local mosquitoes tested positive last week for West Nile Virus, a potentially serious illness, prompting the Greene County Combined Health District to begin spraying insecticide in one village neighborhood.

            • Village Council— Revised code to allow flexibility
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              The recent zoning code revision includes changes to allow more flexibility in the code that aligns with goals articulated during the 2010 community visioning project, according to a summary of the update presented to Village Council at Council’s Aug. 6 meeting.

            • New villager Brian Housh—Bringing talents from Thailand
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              When Brian Housh had lived in Yellow Springs for one month, he surprised a friend by handing him a business card. “You’ve only lived here a month — how can you already have a card?” the friend asked.

            • Documentary ‘The Invisible War’— Sexual violence in military endemic
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              In Iraq or Afghanistan today, an American female soldier has a greater chance of being raped than killed by enemy fire. According to estimates by the Department of Defense, in 2010 there were 19,000 violent sexual assaults against women in the military.

            • Painter returns for son’s schooling
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              Aside from the magnetic pull that Yellow Springs seems to exert over artists, painter Tia Acheson felt another element drawing her toward her childhood home. The village native, 41, wanted her son, Luca, 5, to attend the Antioch School where she herself had learned to create.

            • Laying out his wears (pun intended)
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              Laying out his wears, pun intended

            • Village Council—Revenues drop slightly in ’12
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              Revenues in the Village general fund budget have dropped 11 percent overall compared to a year ago this time, according to Village Finance Director Sharon Potter at Council’s Aug. 6 meeting.

            • A ‘group hug’ from YS foundation
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              What do the doors at the library, the mural under the Little Art Theatre marquee, the roof of the Community Children’s Center, the soccer fields at the high school, the dishwasher at the Senior Center, the wood kiln at John Bryan Community Pottery and the handicapped access ramp at Glen Helen have in common?

              Sports

              August 9, 2012
              • United Way slashes funds to YSCC
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                In June the YSCC board learned that its annual funding through United Way of Greater Dayton had been cut from about $16,000 down to $700 for the 2012–13 and 2013–14 fiscal years.

              • The Little Library that could
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                Many positive things can be said about libraries, including that they can’t be too small and a town can’t have too many.

              • Council votes on streetscape Aug. 20
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                At its Aug. 6 meeting, fewer people showed up for Village Council’s discussion on the proposed streetscape changes than at Council’s last meeting, and fewer people spoke against the changes.

              • Council puts drilling ban on hold for now
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                At the Aug. 6 Village Council meeting, a group of citizens urged Council to be the first municipality in the state to ban oil and gas drilling in town in an effort to protect local water.

              • Celebrate art at Art on the Lawn
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                Artists will display their artwork artwork this Saturday, Aug. 11, at the 29th annual Art on the Lawn. The free event, sponsored by Village Artisans, will feature almost 100 artists of all varieties, and will take place on the lawn of Mills Lawn School from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

              • Beers crafted to please the palate
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                The craft beer revolution is coming to Yellow Springs, say the owners of a new microbrewery here whose aim is not to transform local hearts and minds, but palates, one batch of handcrafted beer at a time.

              • Township lawsuit dropped
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                A Greene County Common Pleas Court judge last week brokered a mutual dismissal of the case between the Miami Township Trustees and former Grinnell Mill B&B owner Donna McGovern

                Obituaries

                August 2, 2012
                • Villagers re-decorate for tolerance
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                  When Yellow Springers celebrated Pride weekend last month, many honored the occasion by attaching colorful bands of yarn and felt around trees and light poles downtown. So it came as a shock when some villagers noticed this month that someone had been cutting down the art.

                • A bit of summer street magic
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                  Susan Gartner is one of several residents of the Davis/Whiteman/Phillips Street area who have made block parties a spirited annual event in their neighborhood.

                • Council considers drilling ordinance— Ban would be first in Ohio
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                  Yellow Springs, though far from the epicenter of natural gas fracking in Ohio, could nevertheless become the first town in the state to ban all oil and gas drilling and waste wells within its municipal limits through passage of what is described as rights-based legislation.

                • AUM plans for recovery
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                  After a brief stint as provost this spring, Ellen Wood Hall’s current role as interim president of Midwest has given her a challenge: to reverse downward enrollment trends and to more evenly balance the strengths of all three of the school’s academic programs.

                • Year of challenge for class of ’15
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                  For the first class of the revived Antioch College, the last nine months have been intense.

                July 26, 2012
                • Drought affects crops, lawns
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                  The hot and dry weather this summer has no doubt stressed local homeowners whose lawns have turned brown from lack of rain. But even more stressed are area crops.

                • Timeline for zoning revision
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                  At the July 16 Village Council meeting, Council member Lori Askeland announced an upcoming process to introduce villagers to proposed changes in the Village zoning code.

                • Choice of replacement trees complex
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                  “The right tree for the right location” is a phrase oft repeated by arborists dispensing long-term landscaping advice. It was used several times last week by those focused on deciding how to replace the trees that line the downtown.

                • Quirky tales of village history
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                  Some of the colorful people and places of Yellow Springs history came alive last Sunday, during a walking tour of the village led by local historian Robin Heise.

                July 19, 2012
                • Village Council­— Street trees spark debate
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                  A standing-room only crowd filled Council chambers Monday night, when villagers weighed in on proposed changes to the downtown streetscape, with many expressing distress about the prospect of losing downtown trees

                • Wood grill to light a food movement
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                  It turns out the slow food movement is only partly about food — albeit delicious, fresh, bursting-with-flavor food.

                • One-of-a-kind specs made here
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                  David Flowers has a clear vision for local sustainability. The 27-year-old crafts handmade eyewear from renewable lumber, and though wooden eyeglasses are a new fashion trend, he said his specs are a mix of functionality and art, and above all, a sustainable product.

                • YS schools on 2020 track
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                  Change is the operative word these days for Yellow Springs schools, and summer hasn’t much altered its meaning.

                July 12, 2012
                July 5, 2012
                • A ‘Marriage’ of Mozart and Marx
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                  One might ask what theater company would have the audacity to mix together an 18th century opera, a Marx Brother’s film, Art Speak from the walls of the Chicago Art Institute, and Justin Bieber’s Twitter feed.

                • Streetscape design clarified
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                  Downtown will get a makeover this summer — and it’s not just the sidewalks.

                • Officer chooses retirement
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                  Yellow Springs Police Sergeant Tom Jones retired from the force last week, several days before an internal hearing focused on his conduct was scheduled to take place.

                  Obituaries

                  June 28, 2012
                  • Village Council— TLT seeks preservation funds
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                    At their June 18 meeting, Village Council members heard an appeal from Tecumseh Land Trust, or TLT, asking that Village government help preserve Glen Helen.

                  • World comes to Cincinnati to sing
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                    “Cincinnati will be an international summer chorale village,” Cathy Roma said recently. “No one has seen anything like it.” And Roma will be in the thick of it.

                  • Group urges setting precedent in opposing oil, gas drilling
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                    Yellow Springs may be the first community in Ohio to ban oil and gas drilling and waste wells within its municipal limits using a rights-based ordinance.

                  • Warmer, retro sound for Wheels
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                    For most of the rock ‘n’ roll era, bands delivered their new music as singles on seven-inch vinyl records. One Yellow Springs band is now reviving the analog record in defiance of today’s digital standards,

                  June 21, 2012
                  • Glen Helen kicks off series on environment— Thinking many generations ahead
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                    Not only does U.S. law not protect Americans seven generations from now, it allows the continued creation of environmental toxins that will be hazardous to those in the ten-thousandth generation, according to environmental lawyer Carolyn Raffensperger.

                  • Mix of big dreams, hard reality
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                    To succeed with the revival of Antioch College, its leaders, alumni and community members must create a new culture grounded in “ownership, fearlessness and love,” President Mark Roosevelt told college alumni Saturday night.

                  • Schools consider local food
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                    A new Wellness Committee hopes to secure a grant to support a “farm to school” operation to get locally sourced fresh fruits and vegetables onto the trays of students at both the village’s elementary and secondary schools.

                  • No such thing as a typical day
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                    At last weekend’s Antioch College reunion, students, staff and faculty painted a picture of current college life for Antiochians past.

                  • 2012 Cost of Living update—The village by the numbers
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                    The 2012 Yellow Springs Cost of Living Report was completed this spring by Wright State University’s Center for Urban and Public Affairs (CUPA) and paid for by the James A. McKee Association.

                  June 14, 2012
                  • ‘Our Town’ comes to our town
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                    Thornton Wilder may have had a place like Yellow Springs in mind when he wrote his 1938 play ‘Our Town.’

                  • Reading a summer portal for all ages
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                    How can a person meet the woman behind Tiffany’s glass, learn Arabic, relive the Apollo 11 lunar landing, unravel the secret plot against an ophanage in Botswana and travel through time and space in one summer?

                  • New owners for downtown building
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                    One of the oldest downtown buildings is now in new hands. Four local people last week purchased the property at 228 Xenia Avenue, currently home to Sam & Eddie’s Open Books and Asanda Imports.

                  • GMHA gardens on chopping block
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                    Patricia High is dejected because she has until July 1 to transplant most of her beautiful garden at her Lawson Place unit, or the Greene Metropolitan Housing Authority will remove the plantings.

                  • Economic development plan OKd
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                    A public/private economic sustainability outreach team of local leaders for the purpose of business retention, expansion and attraction.

                  • A new look and safer sidewalks for downtown
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                    Villagers will encounter changes downtown this summer, as a village sidewalk renovation project on the eastern side of Xenia Avenue that aims to make downtown safer and more attractive moves ahead.

                  • Township losing estate revenue
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                    As a result of reduced state and local funds, Miami Township will need to decide how much to rein in the general fund, which is expected to lose nearly 12 percent of its budget this year, and then sustain another 12 percent in cuts the following year.

                    Obituaries

                    June 7, 2012
                      Obituaries

                      May 31, 2012
                      • Food carts allowed, but with rules
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                        The “French fry truck” will no longer enjoy prime frontage along Xenia Avenue downtown. It was ordered not to “obstruct access or sightlines” to other businesses.

                      • From classrooms to coral reefs
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                        Now entering a new phase of her life, Terry Graham, a former field biologist, retires at the end of the school year as science teacher to head back into the field.

                      • Mike DeWine visits YSHS— Native son faces local heat
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                        Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine returned last week to his alma mater, Yellow Springs High School, and shared with students his opinions on gay marriage, abortion and President Obama.

                      • Top students’ nod to village
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                        The pressures of being students and trying to make plans for the future have reared their Cerberean heads in the lives of Yellow Springs High School seniors Erika Chick and Savita Bathija.

                      • Council poised to hire Curliss
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                        Yellow Springs Village Council is poised to vote on whether to hire Interim Manager Laura Curliss as the Village’s permanent manager following its regular June 4 meeting.

                      May 24, 2012
                      • New holiday arts event this year
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                        When Glen Helen announced last fall that it would discontinue its Nature Arts and Crafts Show, plans were made for a new collaborative show.

                      • Arts community, arts policy
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                        Village Council members and local artists and arts supporters this week began a dialogue on the arts and a potential Village government arts policy at Council’s regular May 21 meeting.

                      • Karen Wintrow honored— A local and regional thinker
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                        When Karen Wintrow isn’t thinking about Yellow Springs, she’s thinking about the Dayton region. For that work, Wintrow received the group’s annual Regional Stewardship Award last month.

                      • School board business— More interdisciplinary options coming soon
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                        At the Yellow Springs school board May 17 meeting, School District Superintendent Mario Basora announced that shifts in staffing at the YSHS/McKinney Middle School next year will allow for more advanced placement and interdisciplinary opportunities.

                      • Arts Council brings back classes
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                        Having organized art classes for much of its 40-year history, the Yellow Springs Arts Council is rebooting its educational workshops with a series beginning this week.

                      • Plan dropped; wellhead likely safe
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                        Sometime in 1988, a host of volatile organic chemicals were found deep in the aquifer that feeds the Village’s municipal drinking water wells. Around the same time, the federal government mandated safeguarding the quality of the groundwater.

                      May 17, 2012
                      • Borer likely dooms ash trees
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                        Many majestic canopy trees around the village are ash trees. And if they’re not already infested with the Emerald Ash Borer beetle, they will be soon. Within a few years, they’ll be dead.

                      • School board names likely tax hike
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                        Last week the Yellow Springs school board favored a 7.5-mill levy for the November 2012 ballot to bring in new money to the district and offset several years of deficit spending.

                      • Villagers weigh in on their water
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                        Ask villagers about their experience with Yellow Springs water and the stories will flow.

                      • High school honors high achievers
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                        Yellow Springs High School recognized a number of graduating students at the school’s annual scholarship awards ceremony on Wednesday, May 16.

                      • June 1 deadline for wind, bike project
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                        At Council’s May 7 meeting, Council members continued discussion on both issues, one a project aimed to make the village more attractive to cyclists, and the other adding more renewable energy to the Village energy portfolio.

                      May 10, 2012
                      • WYSO to build up local capacity
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                        On Friday last week at the new WYSO radio studio, the “on air” sign was lit and music director Niki Dakota was swaying in front of an array of switch boards and computer towers.

                      • College accepts class of 2016
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                        This week Dean of Admissions Cezar Mesquita sealed the deposits of 69 students who have committed to becoming the second class of Antioch College students since the school reopened in 2009.

                      • Task force targets drugs
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                        Last year two drug-related arrests in a single incident were made in Yellow Springs by the ACE Task Force, the Greene County agency that fights drug-related crimes at a multijurisdictional level.

                      • A tale of two waters
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                        Soon, Council will choose between upgrading its aging water plant or purchasing water from Springfield. It seems timely, then, to compare various aspects of Yellow Springs and Springfield water.

                      • New book’s paths toward peace
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                        Forgiveness. Attentiveness. Dissent. These might seem like disparate themes, but to Fred Arment they all have one thing in common: they are among the “virtues” that guide the work of advocates for nonviolence.

                      • No-coal choice saved money
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                        The Village’s decision five years ago against investing in a 1,600-megawatt coal-fired power plant in Illinois may have spared its electric customers from decades of high utility bills.

                      • Financing for solar farm is delayed
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                        Financing for a Village solar farm is taking longer than expected, raising uncertainty about when, or whether, the local project will be built.

                      • Opinions differ over wind power
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                        When Ohio’s largest wind farm comes online this summer, 300-ton turbines reaching 40 stories high will convert wind into electricity, and will help Ohioans cut carbon dioxide emissions and stem climate change. Or will it?

                      May 3, 2012
                      • Tackling hard water, hard choices
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                        Of all the critical decisions made by municipal governments, perhaps no decisions are more important than those concerning water.

                      • New pastor leads King center
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                        This month in separate but coordinated moves, Derrick Weston was hired as the new pastor of the First Presbyterian Church as well as the new director of Antioch College’s Coretta Scott King Center for Cultural and Intellectual Freedom.

                      • Senior housing off, for now
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                        An effort to build affordable senior housing on the Barr property downtown was thwarted last month when the project was denied its request for 2012 federal tax credits. However, project organizers consider the set-back only a delay, as they plan to re-apply in 2013.

                      • Chim chim cheroo at Antioch School
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                        Antioch School older group students can now spell one of the longest words in the English language — supercalifragilisticexpialidocious. And they can sing it, too.

                      • Johnson teaches power of the stars
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                        Understanding the energy between the planets and how they affect us can help us to live more positive lives. That is Jennifer Johnson’s belief, and the reason she got interested in astrology 20 years ago.

                      • Green space funds waning
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                        A state program used to preserve area farmland for a decade has been halted, hindering a local land trust’s efforts to protect land from development.

                      • Survive it, from the A-bomb to zombies
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                        Are you ready for the big one? Dorothy’s tornado? The earthquake that finally hits the Midwest fault? Springs Survival is your next stop — don’t make it be your last.

                      • Life of a century, and some change
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                        Herbert Pencil, Friends Care Center’s oldest male resident, was born in North Hampton, Ohio, on Sept. 25, 1909. On that day, America had 46 states, and William Howard Taft was the country’s 27th president.

                      April 26, 2012
                      • Village objects to court ruling in tap-in case
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                        On Friday, April 20, the Village of Yellow Springs filed objections to the first ruling by a Greene County magistrate who decided in favor of Ken and Betheen Struewing in their case against the Village.

                      • The village’s own Rocket Man
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                        Jake Freeman’s work is not rocket science — but it comes pretty close. The local aerospace engineer designs experiments to work in microgravity some 200 miles above the Earth.

                      • Small towns, bigger water bills
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                        The price we pay for the water that flows from our taps is determined by a variety of factors, including a bit of guesswork

                      • Pitstick land purchased for agricultural use
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                        The 100 acres of farmland just north of the Center for Business and Education sold last month to the area farmers who had been farming it. While the local farm does not have a conservation easement on it, its use for agricultural purposes is likely to remain stable for now.

                      • AMP offers green pricing program
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                        At Village Council’s April 16 meeting, Eric Lloyd of AMP, the Village’s municipal power cooperative, presented information on a new green pricing program, Ecosmart Choice, that AMP is offering to its members.

                      April 19, 2012
                      • New e-novel by Ruth Myers­— This writing game’s for a dame
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                        20 years ago, Ruth Myers had succeeded where most writers fail. Instead of just talking about writing novels, she reliably produced them, becoming a dependable midlist author. But two decades later, things have changed. Many writers have had to take publishing into their own hands, and Myers has published a new e-book.

                      • Portraits of village, circa ’70s
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                        When in 1980 local artist Nancy Howell-Koehler needed a portrait taken for her new book, it didn’t seem appropriate that she — a fine art photographer — hire someone to do it. So she devised a way to take a self-portrait using a long shutter release cord. Later, she used the same method to take photos of Yellow Springers.

                      • Bounty of village Earth Day events
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                        To commemorate the 42nd annual Earth Day this weekend, a mix of fun and education are on hand as an environmentally conscious village steps up to raise awareness about the beauty, and fragility, of the global ecosystem.

                      • Council eyes wind power
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                        At their April 16 meeting, Village Council members heard a presentation from Eric Lloyd of AMP, the municipal electric cooperative, regarding the Blue Creek Wind Energy Project, a new wind farm in northwest Ohio.

                      • Artist in residence at Mills Lawn—Students redesign their sign
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                        The fifth-grade art students dove into the buckets of pottery shards in muted shades of blue, pink, orange and brown.

                      • Health aide admits to theft
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                        After a three week investigation, Yellow Springs police arrested Fairborn resident LaRhonda Phillips for stealing and forging checks from an elderly resident in Yellow Springs.

                      • (No, please don’t say it!—) Picture purrrfect!
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                        The refrigerator. Softly humming kitchen sentinel, keeper of the food, chiller of the drink. And, festooned with magnets and clips, quite possibly the most common repository of photos, pictures and notes before Facebook.

                      • CMYS finals features winds, brass
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                        By Jeff Huntington Chamber Music Yellow Springs will present the finals of the 27th annual CMYS Competition for Emerging Professional Ensembles on Sunday, April 29, 7:30 p.m., at the First Presbyterian Church. This competition is designed to give recognition and a career boost to two professional ensembles in their twenties who appear likely to be […]

                      • Court favors Struewings
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                        Last week a Greene County Common Pleas Court magistrate ruled in favor of Ken and Betheen Struewing in their case against the Village over property rights.

                      • Seniority no longer rules
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                        In accordance with new state laws, the Yellow Springs school board at their meeting on Thursday, April 12, loosened the guidelines that determine how the contracts of school administrators and employees can be altered or terminated.

                      April 12, 2012
                      • Oil and water— Drilling stirs new concerns
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                        In the late 1800s northwestern Ohio was at the center of an oil boom, and Ohio became the world’s largest oil producer. Soon drilling moved to eastern and central Ohio, which is today at the center of another fossil fuel boom

                      • Village Council— New law bans texting while driving
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                        At their April 2 meeting, Village Council members unanimously passed a new ordinance that would make it illegal to text while driving in Yellow Springs.

                      • Council eyes economic plan
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                        Village Council members at their April 2 meeting heard a review of the recent Economic Sustainability Plan by several members of the Village Economic Sustainability Commission.

                      • Yoga Springs stretches to Springfield
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                        Yoga Springs is now 8 years old and stretching out into a new old space at the heart of downtown Springfield.

                      • Dining a la cart in village
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                        New eateries are popping up all over Yellow Springs this spring, but don’t expect to sit down for dinner. The vendors are mobile, and so are their patrons, who have no trouble walking, talking and eating their cheesy hot dogs and fresh-cut fries on the street.

                      • YSHSTAA’s Curtain Warmer­— Keeping theater alive for the kids
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                        Performing in theater helps students feel a part of a team, learn to memorize lines and organize information, respect deadlines, develop empathy and build self esteem. And above all, it’s fun.

                      April 5, 2012
                      • Temporary chief doesn’t take to retirement
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                        Yellow Springs Interim Police Chief Arthur Scott tried retirement, but it didn’t take. So instead he decided to go to Afghanistan. When he returned to the United States, he was ready to dive into the work world again.

                      • Leadership shift at Midwest
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                        The day-to-day operations of Antioch University Midwest are under a new leader, since President Michael Fishbein, while still maintaining his title, is no longer on the premises. Dr. Ellen Hall, who was recently named provost of Midwest, is now responsible for running the school.

                      • The trout beckons, in key of A
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                        A film documenting the rehearsal and performance of Schubert’s Trout quintet before Queen Elizabeth in 1969 by five soon-to-be world class musicians, will be screened at the Little Art Theatre as part of a fundraiser for the local Chamber Music Yellow Springs. The Winds Cafe will host a trout dinner following the film.

                      • Canadian David Suzuki speaks after film— Environmental icon comes to YS
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                        If you had one last lecture to give, what would you say? In the film Force of Nature, Dr. David Suzuki, known as the godfather of the environmental movement in Canada, delivers a legacy lecture indicting humanity for undermining the planet’s life support systems.

                      • Water pollution we all create— Catching up with runaway runoff
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                        There is a gully in the Glen at the northeast edge of the village, not far from the Glen Helen Building. When it rains, water comes rushing into the Glen, carrying with it the runoff from the village, its street oils, its lawn chemicals, and its trash.

                      • ‘Grease’ grabs YSHS hearts
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                        When Grease was announced as this year’s spring musical over the loudspeaker at Yellow Springs High School, students screamed.

                      • Creative Memories closes YS shop
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                        Creative Memories will close its Yellow Springs manufacturing plant at the end of April, concluding The Antioch Company’s 86-year presence in the village.

                      March 29, 2012
                      • Funderburg Farm— Asking horses to trust people
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                        At the place where east Hyde Road ends and unspoiled farmland begins, Pat Funderburg has his own practice of asking, not telling, and working with instead of against, the horses on his family’s farm.

                      • Politics divide local Catholics
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                        Recently, some parishioners have made public their distress that St. Paul Catholic Church has become more politically conservative and at the same time less welcoming to Yellow Springs residents.

                      • Toxic sites are under control
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                        Over the past two decades, Vernay, along with Morris Bean & Company, YSI, Inc. and the Village Water Reclamation plant, have all been point sources of pollution to local ground and surface water. But through their efforts and work with the U.S. and Ohio Environmental Protection Agencies, all four point sources of area water pollution have made strides to control and mitigate the damage they caused to the local watershed.

                      • Council takes on distracted driving
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                        At their March 19 meeting, Village Council members had an initial dialogue on a proposed local law to ban texting while driving. The item was discussion only, although Council plans to vote on an ordinance at its April 2 meeting.

                      • McKinney focuses on wellness
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                        Bullying is a problem everywhere in schools today, according to longtime ­McKinney Middle School teacher Sarah Lowe, and Yellow Springs is no exception.

                      • Schools initiate new tax levy
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                        Yellow Springs school board members faced a room of empty chairs last week as they discussed a school tax hike at their “committee of the whole” meeting on Thursday, March 22.

                      March 22, 2012
                      • AU names new chancellor
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                        This week Antioch University announced that Felice Nudelman, executive director of education for the New York Times Company, will be the university’s new chancellor beginning July 1. Nudelman will take the place of current Chancellor Toni Murdock, who is retiring at the end of seven years in that position.

                      • Closing one door—Bittersweet goodbyes for the chief
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                        After 25 years on the local force, Yellow Springs Police Chief John Grote’s last day on the job will be Friday, March 30. While his decision was mainly sparked by health concerns — he’s diabetic and has had two heart attacks in recent years — he also feels he has run his course as the Yellow Springs chief.

                      • C of C efforts pay off— Village a mecca for many
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                        A mecca for arts lovers. A thoroughfare for avid bicyclists and hikers. A place to soak up street life and people watch. And now, a town in which slightly buzzed tourists can wander from bars to restaurants to shops.

                      • Nudes reveal arts controversy
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                        Village Council will push to create a local policy for public art because of complaints from several Village employees about nudity and sexual content in artwork at the annual “Women’s Voices Out Loud” exhibit now on display at John Bryan Community Center.

                      March 15, 2012
                      • Bender honored for WWII service
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                        As a boy growing up in Mississippi, Jonas Bender knew about racism and segregation. But living in “the oasis of integration” that was the college town of Tougaloo, Bender knew about racism mainly from other people’s stories.

                      • Spring has officially, and very quickly, arrived
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                        Spring has sprung three to four weeks early this year, as evidenced by the billowy white pear trees downtown, which most often bloom in mid April.

                      • Schools commit to laptops
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                        The schools are talking tech this year, with a recently established goal to purchase laptop computers to replace the district’s desktop computers, some of which are 10 to 13 years old.

                      • Harlem Quartet in residency here
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                        Yellow Springs is hosting the Harlem String Quartet in a mini-residency from Thursday through Monday, organized by Chamber Music Yellow Springs.

                      • Real watershed moments for area
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                        Where Yellow Springs begins and ends is defined by clear political boundaries. But the village also exists within an ecosystem that has boundaries of its own. An important one is its watershed, an area of land that drains into a common waterway.

                      • Village to begin sidewalk repair
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                        Village Council took a first step toward implementing its village-wide sidewalk repair project at its March 5 meeting.

                      • Glen adjusts course of events
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                        The annual Glen Helen pancake breakfast is one of several that Glen leaders are evaluating this year in order to streamline their activities

                        Obituaries

                        March 8, 2012
                        • Village water, from the ground up
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                          You could say the Yellow Springs water system began about 425 million years ago, when a large inland sea covered the area.

                        • Of sharing food and company
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                          At three upcoming potlucks, starting next week, villagers can share their cooking and enjoy the “luck of the pot.”

                        • New economic plan presented to Council
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                          At their March 5 meeting, Village Council members heard a presentation of the new Yellow Springs Economic Sustainability Plan, created by the Economic Sustainability Commission.

                        • Standing up for a threatened people
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                          Far from the fertile green fields of Yellow Springs, in the arid high desert of the four corners region of Arizona, live the scattered families of the Navajo, or Diné, tribe. They have, for decades, resisted federal government attempts to remove them from their ancestral land, and have done so with the help of some […]

                        • Student killed in car crash
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                          In a car accident early in the morning of Friday, March 2, Yellow Springs resident Sarah Hammond was killed, along with two of her friends, as they were heading to the Detroit airport.

                        March 1, 2012
                        • ‘Super Tuesday’ is March 6
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                          Local voters will take to the polls Tuesday in the Ohio primary election to choose candidates who will face off in November.

                        • CAP plans for video group
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                          At its Feb. 21 meeting, Village Council heard the annual report of the Yellow Springs Community Access Panel, or CAP, the group that broadcasts meetings of Village commissions and panels on the local public access station.

                        • Many issues of village water
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                          Water. We can’t live without it. But chances are, we don’t spend much time thinking about it. And questions regarding water quality are edging closer to Yellow Springs.

                        • Muse concert this Saturday— Singing out for women and world
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                          The story of the Cincinnati vocal ensemble Muse begins 29 years ago, when doctoral student Catherine Roma combined her interests in choral conducting, peace and justice and feminism by starting a women’s choir to emphasize the female voice, empower women and promote social change.

                        • Present gives voices to village past
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                          Yellow Springs’ founders and early settlers didn’t have Internet — they probably couldn’t have imagined it — but later generations are now using it to imagine the lives of former villagers.

                          Obituaries

                          February 23, 2012
                          • Cundiff off to new job in Sidney
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                            Departing Village Manager Mark Cundiff reflected on the effect on Yellow Springs of his three-year tenure Friday, Feb. 17, his last day on the job.

                          • Village Council— Barr restructuring plan OKd
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                            At their Feb. 21 meeting, Village Council members unanimously passed two resolutions that authorize a restructuring of financial support for the proposed Home Inc./Buckeye Community Hope Foundation senior affordable housing project.

                          • Next window, please— Moore retires from US Bank
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                            Having seen four bank name changes and 45 years of service, Carol Moore is finally retiring from her long-held position of bank teller at the local branch.

                          • YSHS teacher settles, resigns
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                            During a special meeting on Thursday, Feb. 16, the Yellow Springs school board accepted the resignation of Yellow Springs High School chemistry teacher Michelle Edwards.

                          • Past meets present
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                            Yellow Springs’ past meets present in these historical composites. See a gallery after the jump.

                          February 16, 2012
                          • News wins top state prize
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                            For the second year in a row and the third time in the past five years, the Yellow Springs News was honored as the top newspaper in its size category at the annual Ohio Newspaper Association convention.

                          • Artist Linda Stein at Antioch College — Sparking new thinking on gender
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                            sculptor and performance artist Linda Stein comes to Antioch College on Wednesday, Feb. 22, at 8 p.m.to speak on “Salander/Blomkvist: Challenging stereotypes in The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo — and beyond.” The talk will take place in McGregor Hall Room 113 on the college campus.

                          • Johannes Quartet in YS
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                            Chamber Music Yellow Springs will present the Johannes String Quartet at 7:30 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 26 at the First Presbyterian Church, playing Mozart’s Quartet in E-flat K.428, Schumann’s Quartet Op.41 No.1, and Ottorino Respighi’s Quartet in D Major from 1904.

                          • Show goes on for One-Acts
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                            It’s a Friday night in Yellow Springs and a group of high school kids are looking for things to do. The typical, albeit caricatured, teenage banter is captured in a one-act play written by YSHS students Rory Papania and Lois Miller and will be performed at this year’s annual staging of student-written, student-directed pieces.

                          • WYSO gets Localore grant
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                            When a grant for public radio stations to collaborate with independent media producers came across WYSO general manager Neenah Ellis’ desk, she saw that it would be a perfect opportunity to work with local award-winning documentarians Julia Reichert and Steve Bognar.

                          • School as wireless provider?
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                            The Yellow Springs school district, in partnership with other local agencies, could potentially become a wireless Internet provider for the entire village.

                          • Students oppose teacher’s imposed leave
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                            About 80 Yellow Springs High School students walked out of school last week in protest of the school administration’s decision to place a high school teacher on administrative leave.

                            Obituaries

                            February 9, 2012
                            • Council okays search process
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                              At their Feb. 6 meeting, Village Council members agreed to hire Don Vermillion of the University of Dayton as consultant for the Village manager search process.

                            • New family doctor comes to town
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                              The local arts scene — and specifically this week’s Chamber Music Yellow Springs concert — can take some credit for bringing Dr. Alan Fark, a new physician, to town.

                            • Chamber Music Yellow Springs to fund new music
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                              Chamber Music Yellow Springs recently extended a rare invitation for a new work by an artist whose exposure to music growing up in the village delivered him to the life of a composer.

                            • Blind pigs, turkeys, goats find home
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                              Nick Ormes can rattle off from memory the animals he looks after on his 12-acre animal sanctuary on US 68. Abandoned or neglected by their owners, these animals faced a life of suffering or the slaughterhouse until Ormes, 58, stepped in to save them.

                            • 90 years child-centered learning
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                              To keep the Antioch School, one of America’s oldest independent schools alive, its board and development committee will put on an anniversary auction gala next month commemorating the Antioch School’s 90th school year to raise $25,000 for tuition scholarships and operating expenses.

                            • Antioch College’s ‘Happy crisis’ continues
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                              The recent “happy crisis” of Antioch College going viral on the Internet with its offer of a tuition-free education took center stage at the college’s Board of Trustees meeting last weekend, with leaders discussing how to respond to the unexpected national and international attention.

                            • YS Arts Council finds new home
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                              When the Yellow Springs Arts Council moved to its new gallery space on Corry Street last month, the group was following the mission prescribed by the community: grow in capacity and keep art and public art events vibrant in Yellow Springs.

                            February 2, 2012
                            • Village a good host for babies
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                              When Laura Funderburg had her son, Carson, now almost 2, she knew the village was a better fit for the way she wanted to raise her son. And the warm community of parents and children she has found in the village erased all doubt in her mind that she made the right decision.

                            • Feminist film gets national honor
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                              As Antioch College students in the late 1960s, Julia Reichert and Jim Klein made a feature film about the experience of being female that both rode the modern wave of the feminist movement.

                            • Another delay for the CBE
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                              New set-backs for the Center for Business and Education have arisen, and now it’s likely that infrastructure construction on the local industrial park won’t begin until well into 2013.

                            • College in national spotlight
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                              Antioch College’s decision to continue the Horace Mann Scholarships had some unintended consequences. After an online article on the move was posted on Yahoo! News, the College was flooded with thousands of applications and deluged with inquiries.

                            • Fairborn man dies in village
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                              At 7:50 a.m. on Sunday morning, Jan. 29, police responded to a scene along the bike path, where the victim of an apparent suicide was found by a passing jogger.

                            • Here to help dogs do good
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                              Veera, a 10-month-old golden retriever in training at 4 Paws for Ability in Xenia, is a very smart dog. Thanks to her handler, Yarden Oron, the dog is learning skills she will need when she graduates and gets placed as a service dog to help someone living with epilepsy.

                            January 26, 2012
                            • Village Council— Arts group requests space
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                              At their January 17 meeting, Village Council considered whether they should provide the Yellow Springs Arts Council rent-free space in a Village facility, after hearing a request from an Arts Council representative.

                            • Tragedy sparks effort for new laws
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                              Life changed swiftly, horribly and irrevocably for the Drummond family on a hot sunny August day last year. Jaye and Kelly Drummond had taken their two children, Lauren, 5, and Matthew, 3, for a picnic at the George Rogers Clark Park west of Springfield, where they lived at the time. They decided to drive back […]

                            • With chess, thinking and fun unite
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                              Older Group boys at the Antioch School began lobbying about a year ago to make chess the focus of the school’s annual artist-in-residency for the annual Emily Bailey arts residency.

                            • Conley’s hard work his passion
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                              By the time he came to work as a Village crewman 19 years ago, Dave Conley was already a veteran of infrastructure maintenance.

                            • Local girls invited to “A Girls Night Out”
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                              YSHS and McKinney girls are invited to “A Girls Night Out” on Saturday, Feb. 4, 7-11 p.m. at YSHS.

                            • Drilling effects on groundwater questioned
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                              Despite a yearlong campaign by Yellow Springs and Miami Township residents and environmental activists urging that area landowners not lease their land for oil and gas drilling, three residents northwest of the village in Miami Township have signed lease agreements.

                            January 19, 2012
                            • Cultivating global green thumbs
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                              For many, yard work can be a chore. For Nadia Malarkey, the care and cultivation of her backyard labyrinth of trees, vines and plants is perennially a joy. At their best, gardens can be places of respite, connection and, above all, environmental stewardship.

                            • Council hires interim manager
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                              Village Council last week came to a contract agreement with Wilmington attorney Laura Curliss, who will soon start her position as the Village interim manager.

                            • New chair for board
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                              The Antioch College Board of Trustees this week appointed Frances Degen Horowitz, ’54, as board chair, replacing Lee Morgan, ’66. Morgan will remain on the board as vice-chair, according to a press release, but will focus on fundraising.

                            • More sun in the Springs (Motel)
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                              The latest update to the Springs Motel isn’t in the rooms but on the roof, where 20 solar photovoltaic panels now power the televisions, hair dryers and air conditioners of motel guests.

                            • Local kale for the K–12 crowd? Lessons in fresh food service
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                              Three years into the Columbus-area school’s local food initiative, its cafeteria regularly serves up healthy meals prepared on-site using raw, organic ingredients, about 40 percent of which are sourced from within 125 miles of the school.

                            • Morgan grant for housing
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                              The senior apartment development proposed for the Barr property received a boost last week when the Morgan Family Foundation committed $250,000 to help finance some of the units.

                            • Eagleson new creative director at college
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                              Former longtime Antioch College faculty member Dennie Eagleson has returned to the college in the new half-time position of creative director, the college announced earlier this month.

                            • The revelation of being a painter
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                              From January until mid-February, painter Patricia Cole will be artist-in-residence at Antioch College.

                            • Courageous conversation at Antioch
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                              A common theme emerged during the Antioch College MLK Day panel on diversity issues at the college. The panelists related similar stories of the stress and isolation of being a minority student. However, they also agreed that the college taught them critical skills that they see as unique to the Antioch experience.

                            January 12, 2012
                            • At winter market, greens in the gray
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                              The Yellow Springs Winter Farmers Marketlaunched its third season last Saturday, Jan. 7, in the basement of the First Methodist Church.

                            • Ashes to ashes, dust to diamonds
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                              Local jewelry store Rita Caz has long helped customers honor deceased friends and relatives. But a recent request by a former Springfield man who now lives in Arizona to set a diamond ring made from his wife’s ashes was a first.

                            • New Liberty raises local food IQ
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                              Seven-year-old Sampson is one lucky goat, according to his caretaker, Abby Dant of Xenia. Sampson was the demonstration goat at a workshop last weekend at the United Methodist Church, the first of six winter food and farming events organized by New Liberty Farms.

                            • A fresh bid for Congress
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                              Local resident Sharen Neuhardt has played the political odds before and learned a lot while ceding the 2008 Congressional race to her Republican opponent. But this year, after redistricting, the odds are more favorable for Democrats

                            • Village Council— Budget review shows revenue drop
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                              At Village Council’s Jan. 3 meeting, Council members revisited the 2012 general fund budget and proposed Village capital projects for this year. Overall, the Village anticipates a drop in its general fund of about 25 percent compared to 2011,

                            • Upbeat season for downtown
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                              For those turned off by the endless lines and swarming hoards of Black Friday shoppers at big box stores and malls, Yellow Springs may be a less hectic and more pleasant alternative.

                            • A therapy dog in need of some help
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                              Recently, Diane Davis discovered that her dog has a congenital malformation on her left knee, which causes pain and lameness. Consequently, Raskel can’t walk on slippery hospital floors like other service dogs.

                              Obituaries

                              January 5, 2012
                              • A brew of perfect proportion
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                                If there were such a thing as the perfect beer, the new Vitruvian Brewing Company would brew it. Their aim is to create a brew so perfectly balanced in nutrient, aroma and flavor that it could be called a “canon of proportions,” like the Vitruvian Man.

                              • Oil company drilling OK’d
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                                Oil drilling may soon begin just outside Yellow Springs as a Miami Township couple recently gave an out-of-state oil and gas company permission to drill on their 61-acre property on West Yellow Springs-Fairfield Road.

                              • Miyazaki photo exhibit— True faces of Wisconsin protesters
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                                Kevin Miyazaki, a photojournalist by trade, decided to record a more accurate picture of the Wisconsin statehouse protesters by setting up a portrait studio on the sidewalk and photographing the people who had come to voice their concerns.

                              • Council ranks transition items
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                                At their Jan. 3 meeting, Village Council members identified the work projects that Village Manager Mark Cundiff will finish before he leaves his job, along with priorities for the new interim manager.

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