Articles From March 2011

  • Achievement gap complex, but true

    When Joyce McCurdy accepted a teaching position in the Yellow Springs School District, there was a black chief of police, a black member of Council, and a black member of school board. The principal of the high school was black, and three of McCurdy’s colleagues were also black — and actively involved in the social issues of the day. The year was 1965.

  • Superintendent search process moves forward

    A significant outreach effort to find outstanding candidates for the position of Yellow Springs school superintendent is currently taking place, according to the leaders of the Yellow Springs school board at the board’s Feb. 11 meeting.

  • 2010 projects may include zoning update

    A zoning code update. Safety improvements and upgrades for the skate park. Energy improvements for Village buildings.

  • Bye-bye-athlon

    Robert Hasek got his wintertime thrills, making his way home in the dusky hours over a fresh blanket of snow through Beatty Hughes Park last week, which his daughter, Olivia, almost 3, tolerated heroically.

    Robert Hasek got his wintertime thrills, making his way home in the dusky hours over a fresh blanket of snow.

  • Michael V. McCann

    Michael V. McCann died Monday, Feb. 1, in his home, surrounded by family. He was 62.

  • Jo Ann Molk

    Jo Ann Molk of Yellow Springs died Monday, Feb. 1. She was 79.

  • Girls basketball loses two

    The Lady Bulldogs basketball team suffered another tough loss against Jefferson, 45–35 on Monday, Feb. 1, and then lost to Middletown Christian, 40–31, on Thursday, Feb. 4.

  • Boys basketball team wins for fun

    Tied with Emmanuel Christian for number one in the Metro Buckeye Conference and holding up a 12–2 record three-fourths of the way through the season, this year’s Yellow Springs High School boys varsity basketball team has raised eyebrows. Having steadily improved their record each year since suffering a 3–16 season in 2007, the Bulldogs are charging into tournament time with ambitious sights set on state.

  • Wright’s lifelong love for Japanese poetry across the ages

    Harold Wright has what is sometimes referred to as a “hard head.” The stubbornness of this 79-year-old retired college professor has been one of few consistencies in a life that has taken him to places as distant as Hawaii, Tokyo and New York City.

  • Diversity gap creates social divide

    When Isabel Newman graduated from Bryan High School in 1943, Antioch Bookplate President Ernest Morgan hired her to work for the company. Soon after, he sent her to a six-week course at the Mergenthaler linotype school in New York, and upon her return, she worked for the company for over 40 years, retiring as a manager. At that company, whose president actively promoted racial integration, she recalled that typically a fourth of the employees were minorities. The support for a racially diverse staff appeared to be the same at Vernay Laboratories, where two of Newman’s sisters worked, Yellow Springs Instruments and Antioch College, the place that bred all three companies and their socially minded leaders.

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