Articles From March 2011

  • Bulldogs bow

    Copies of this and other photographs may be purchased from the News; please contact us via e-mail at ysnews {at} ysnews(.)com, or by phone, between 9:30 a.m. and 5: 30 p.m., Mon.–Fri. RELATED POSTS: They went that-a-way! A real kicker Not quite game The confidence for the Conference SPORTS SUNDAY—Bulldogs fall to Troy Christian

  • Jo Ann Molk

    A memorial service will be held on March 13 for Jo Ann Molk, who died in February. The memorial service will begin at 2 p.m. in the Glen Helen Building.

  • David McLellan

    David Stanley McLellan, a retired professor of political science at Miami University and the author of several books about international affairs, died Sunday, Feb. 21, at his home in Yellow Springs. He was 85.

  • Hellen O’Neal McCray

    Hellen O’Neal McCray, Freedom Rider, Springfield City elementary school teacher, Wilberforce University professor and civil rights and community activist, died Feb. 24 at 10:45 a.m. after a year’s battle with cancer. She was 68.

  • Bulldog Sports round-up

    Left, senior Ryan Phillips shot six points for the Bulldogs in their 68–45 win against Emmanuel Christian in the first round of Div. IV sectional play on Sunday afternoon, Feb. 28. Right, Amber Dudgeon looked for a pass around Franklin-Monroe on Thursday, Feb. 25, during the opening round of the YSHS girls basketball Div. IV sectional tournament. Yellow Springs lost 73–36.

    The high school swimming season ended this past weekend with Erika Chick and Elizabeth Malone’s combined scores giving Yellow Springs a 13th place finish. Chick, a sophomore, brought home two bronze medals from the State meet. Chick placed third in the 200-meter freestyle with a time of 1:53.03. She also finished third in the 500 freestyle with a time of 5:03.03.

    Elizabeth Malone, also a sophomore, placed 10th overall in the 100 butterfly with a time of 1:00.15 and 12th in the 200 IM with a time of 2:12.71. For the fifth time in 10 years, the Bulldog boys basketball team finished its regular season in first place in the Metro Buckeye Conference with an 11–1 league record and a 15–3 season record, putting the team in a class with just a handful of other teams in the school’s history. The girls basketball team lost 73-36 to Franklin-Monroe in their first tournament game. Amber Dudgeon had 14 points and Maryah Martin put up 12.

  • Fairy tale-come-true for YSHS playwright contest winners

    Yellow Springs High School students wrote two out of six winning plays at a recent regional high school playwriting competition. Pictured are, from left, Stefany Lewis, Shirlisa Scott and Philip Kellogg, with teacher Desireé Nickell in back. Their pieces will be performed in the Schuster Center’s Matile Black Box Theatre this weekend, March 5, 6, and 7 at 7 pm.

    What happens when Yellow Springs High School students are challenged to spin a new yarn from urban legends and fairy tales? The result, according to organizers of a regional high school playwriting challenge, is vivid characters that dare to leap out of insightful and witty scripts up and onto the stage.

  • ‘News’ wins state awards

    At a recent convention of Ohio newspapers, the Yellow Springs News won awards for in-depth reporting, features, editorials, headlines, overall design and advertising design.

  • Diversity decline linked to fewer jobs

    If Yellow Springs has lost a significant number of jobs in the past 15 years, it follows that villagers have lost employment opportunities, which has a visible effect on an already minority African-American population. There are fewer African Americans employed in the village now than there were 30 years ago, and though there have never been a lot of African Americans who own and operate businesses in town, the current number appears to be lower than ever.

  • Green space funds go to Jacoby farm preservation

    At their March 1 meeting, members of Yellow Springs Village Council unanimously approved contributing to the preservation of two farm properties, one of which includes the headwaters of the Jacoby Creek and is the first farm preserved within the Jacoby greenbelt.

  • Worth about 1170 words

    Longtime villager Katherine Kadish is being honored by the Dayton Art Institute with an exhibit, “Katherine Kadish: Seasons,” that runs through April. The exhibit, in the museum’s north and south galleries, features paintings and monotypes from Kadish’s award-winning career. Read the story on page 7 of this week's issue.

    Copies of this and other photographs may be purchased from the News; please contact us via e-mail at ysnews {at} ysnews(.)com, or by phone, between 9:30 a.m. and 5: 30 p.m., Mon.–Fri. RELATED POSTS: Antioch art faculty exhibit edgy work at Herndon Ancient art forms a stone’s throw away Emporium to feature protester portraits

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