Articles by Brooke Bryan

Brooke never leaves home without her audio recorder, and has a habit of rearranging her furniture. She can often be found photographing fire hydrants and interviewing strangers. Or in other people's kitchens. A graduate of Antioch University's World Classics program, she is interested in how thought moves through time and how life is a story we tell ourselves. Before venturing to grad school and a position with WYSO, she held the record for sheer column inches at the News, and was known as the reporter who was "fond of data."

More Articles by Brooke Bryan
  • From Beirut to a bicycle village

    Author and Central State professor Jayson Iwen and yoga teacher Jovana Bouche Iwen are new residents of Yellow Springs. They’re shown with their son, Marlow. (Photo by Brooke Bryan)

    The Iwens are used to feeling the air move against their faces, and to these new villagers, the air in Yellow Springs has seemed sweet since the first encounter.

  • School district seeks levy to ride out recession deficit

    A school tax levy is “a community thing,” according to organizers who are bringing Issue 5, an $8.7 mill renewal emergency levy, to the ballot on May 4.

  • Basora top choice for superintendent

    The Yellow Springs School Board hiring committee announced Thursday, April 8, that Mario Basora is the finalist for the position of superintendent.

    Yellow Springs school board members will soon visit Wyoming Middle School in Cincinnati, the top performing school in the state — and the home school of superintendent finalist candidate Mario Basora, who was announced as the finalist at the Thursday, April 8, school board meeting.

  • Schools support Rwanda grant

    The laughter-filled April 8 school board meeting saw the approval of two new principals for village schools, the naming of the finalist candidate for the superintendent position, and the announcement of two new multi-age classrooms in the elementary school during the 2010–2011 school year.

  • New principals for Mills Lawn and McKinney/YSHS

    Tim Krier, left, and Matt Housh, right

    At the April 8 Board of Education meeting, Interim Superintendent Tony Armocida said he is pleased to recommend candidates Matt Housh and Tim Krier to the board for approval for the positions of principals of Mills Lawn School and YSHS/McKinney, respectively. Click the title to read more.

  • Final superintendent candidate visits

    Mario Basora, a candidate for the village's superintendent position, presented to the community Wednesday night. Also in attendance was his wife, Alice, and children Mateo and Carina. Basora is currently the principal of Wyoming Middle School, the top-performing school in the state.

    Mario Basora, the third candidate for the superintendent position in the Yellow Springs School District, presented elements of his life and work to the community at Mills Lawn on Wednesday evening. Basora — who is currently principal of Wyoming Middle School in Cincinnati, the state of Ohio’s top performing school — said it’s important to him that the community get a feel for who he is and how he thinks about education. First, he said, is his family. And he happened to bring them along.

  • Neighborhood gardens grow community, savings

    Neighborhood gardens — shared plots for gardening with others near and within neighborhoods on Village-owned land — are new to Yellow Springs, and may be growing on land near you this year.

  • Schools hire new treasurer

    Yellow Springs Board of Education members unanimously voted to approve the hiring of a new treasurer for the Yellow Springs schools at the board’s March 11 meeting. Dawn Weller will begin service to the district on April 5, 2010, at an annual salary of $99,700 on a three-year contract. Weller comes to the district after 13 years as treasurer of the Greenon Local School District in Enon.

  • Do housing costs affect diversity?

    If local diversity can be measured by the number of African Americans who live within the geographical boundaries of Yellow Springs, the village has experienced three decades of decreasing diversity, and is likely wrapping up a fourth. Since 1970, the village has lost about 500 African-American residents, mirroring a larger regional trend.

  • Fairy tale-come-true for YSHS playwright contest winners

    Yellow Springs High School students wrote two out of six winning plays at a recent regional high school playwriting competition. Pictured are, from left, Stefany Lewis, Shirlisa Scott and Philip Kellogg, with teacher Desireé Nickell in back. Their pieces will be performed in the Schuster Center’s Matile Black Box Theatre this weekend, March 5, 6, and 7 at 7 pm.

    What happens when Yellow Springs High School students are challenged to spin a new yarn from urban legends and fairy tales? The result, according to organizers of a regional high school playwriting challenge, is vivid characters that dare to leap out of insightful and witty scripts up and onto the stage.

  • Village youth say race is still an issue

    Yellow Springs can be a supportive town for black youth to grow up in, according to a group of 10 current Yellow Springs High School students and recent graduates in recent interviews. But the village is not immune to the issues that tend to divide the community by color and burden some African-American families disproportionately. Instances of discrimination are very subtle, and can be unintentional, but they do occur here, the youth said, and they pose obstacles both of perception and in actual practice that young people of color are challenged to overcome.

Weather forecast by WP Wunderground & Denver Snow Removal