Articles by Diane Chiddister :: Page 58

  • Xenia Ave. walks to be fixed

    At its Aug. 3 meeting, Village Council voted to enhance walkability in the village by moving ahead with a long-planned project to repair sidewalks on the east side of Xenia Avenue between Friends Care Community and downtown. In accordance with a current Village ordinance, property owners whose walks are deemed subpar will be held responsible for the repair costs.

  • Armocida takes interim job

    On Wednesday, July 29, the Yellow Springs Board of Education approved former longtime Yellow Springs superintendent Tony Armocida as the district’s interim superintendent for one year.

  • November election deadline nears

    With only three weeks until the deadline to file and seven seats up for grabs, only one newcomer has indicated interest in running for a local office, while several incumbents have stated their intention to seek re-election.

  • Glismann leaves this week

    Norman Glismann

    Yellow Springs schools Superintendent Norm Glismann is leaving his job after two years because he did not feel he was a good fit with the community or the school district, he said. “I have professional and personal values that had to be put on the back burner too often,” he said in an interview Tuesday. […]

  • A run for awareness, support

    Yellow Springs High School cross country team members Reini Brickman, left, Lois Miller and Paloma Wiggins have organized “Simply Women,” a 5k run/walk for women and girls to take place on Saturday, Aug. 8, at the high school. The event aims to raise funds for the girls cross country team and to raise awareness about the importance of girls participating in sports.

    [W]iggins, an incoming freshman at Yellow Springs High School, almost never found out that she loves to run. And she certainly never considered joining the school’s cross country team. Running was too hard, she thought, and she wasn’t good enough to join a team.

  • Diversity deemed critical for visioning

    At their July 20 meeting, members of Village Council approved the names of visioning steering committee members, but also urged organizers to try harder to find participants from the African-American community.

  • Some villagers are in need

    In some ways, Yellow Springs has been insulated from the most profound aspects of the current economic turmoil. Overall, local housing prices have remained steady, foreclosures are few and several of the village’s largest businesses are linked to the relatively recession-proof industries of education and health care.

  • Council considers revised land use plan

    The Urban Service Area (shown within the thick black lines) is the area, some of which is outside current Village boundaries, that can mainly be served by gravity sewer and has been identified by a previous Council as the boundary for potential growth, should it occur.

    The often contentious issue of annexation sparked conflict between Council members during the July 6 meeting of Village Council. At issue was the language in the Yellow Springs Comprehensive Plan, which was recently revised by Planning Commission. The plan, which is the land use plan for the village, is revised by the planners and submitted for Council approval every five to seven years.

  • Boots on the ground for Antioch

    Matthew Derr, the chief transition officer for the Antioch College Continuation Corporation, is heading up efforts to revive the college after the ACCC and Antioch University trustees reached an agreement last week. Still a resident of Boston, he plans to move to Yellow Springs in the future.

    If you ask Matthew Derr how many hours per week he spends on his job, he’s stumped. During a recent interview, he made an earnest attempt to answer the question before giving up.

  • Signed agreement prepares way for transfer of college

    On Tuesday, June 30, the boards of Antioch University and the Antioch College Continuation Corporation, or ACCC, announced that each unanimously approved an agreement that paves the way for the creation of an independent Antioch College in Yellow Springs.

  • Iran turmoil hits home for some

    Villagers with family and friends in Iran have been watching the recent turmoil in that country closely. Among them are, shown above from left, new village resident Farideh Tahririha, holding her great-nephew Sameer Sajabi; Nacim Sajabi, who was raised in Yellow Springs, with her son, Mateen; and Mahshad Tahririha and her aunt, Farzaneh Mader, Nacim’s mother.

    When Nacim Sajabi had her first child several years ago, she surprised herself by speaking to her baby in Farsi, the language of Iran, her mother’s homeland. While Sajabi’s mother, Farzaneh Mader, and her aunts and grandmother had spoken Farsi to Sajabi as she grew up in Yellow Springs, she most often responded in English. But the birth of her firstborn seemed to spark inside her some deep connection with the language she didn’t even know she had.

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