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Articles by Diane Chiddister :: Page 62

  • YSCC helps send kids to camp

    A local philanthropic organization has found a niche that members hope will benefit Yellow Springs children, local nonprofits and the environment: specifically, helping local kids go to summer camp.

  • Miller grants earmarked for town/gown

    A love for Antioch College and Yellow Springs led longtime village residents Nolan and Richard Miller to leave a legacy that benefits both.

  • Levy passes handily

    Village Matters thumbnail

    The Yellow Springs property tax levy renewal passed by a wide margin on Tuesday, May 3, with 65

  • YS officer honored for child advocacy

    Yellow Springs Police Officer Naomi Penrod was honored April 28 for her work with abused and neglected children. She received a "Child Advocate of the Year" award from Greene County Children Services. She's shown at the awards breakfast with Yellow Springs Police Chief John Grote and Village Administrative Assistant Ruthe Ann Lillich. (Submitted photo)

    Yellow Springs Police Officer Naomi Penrod was honored April 28 by the Greene County Children Services with a “Child Advocate of the Year” award for her work with abused and neglected children.

  • ‘Antioch Review’ keeps surprising

    Bob Fogarty is editor of the small but mighty Antioch Review, finalist for a third year in a row for the sought-after ‘Ellie’ award. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    Each edition of The Antioch Review begins the same way. Editor Bob Fogarty sits in the rust-colored chair in his office, picks up a submitted essay, and begins reading.

  • A celebration of the Peace Corps—A life-changing experience

    A local celebration of the Peace Corps, which is observing its 50th birthday, will take place in Yellow Springs this Sunday, April 17, from 1:30 to 4 p.m. at the Senior Center. Shown above are former Peace Corps volunteers, from left seated in front, Virginia Caudill and Priscilla Janney-Pace. In the back, from left, are Hap Cawood, Jeanne Lemkau, Hardy Ballantine, Kay Reimers and Suzanne Oldham. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    Yellow Springs is known as a singular place, but villagers may be unaware of one unique aspect of the village: its residents include an unexpectedly large percentage of returned Peace Corps volunteers.

  • Peace Corps volunteers to gather on Sunday

    Several of the 26 returned Peace Corps volunteers who live in the village gathered recently for a photo. They will celebrate the organization's 50th birthday this Sunday, April 17, from 1:30 to 4 p.m. at the Senior Center. Shown above are, seated from left, Virginia Caudill and Priscilla Janney Pace. Standing are, from left, Hap Cawood, Jeanna Lemkau, Hardy Ballantine, Kay Reimers and Suzanne Oldham.

    This Sunday local returned Peace Corps volunteers will gather at the Senior Center from 1:30 to 4 p.m. for a celebration of the organization’s 50th birthday. The public is invited.

  • The community in community theater

    A group of local actors and theater-lovers will present Anton Chekhov’s The Cherry Orchard this weekend and next in the Presbyterian Church’s Westminster Hall as a fundraiser to raise money for upgrades to the hall to create a performance space. Pictured above are actors Miriam Eckenrode and Natalie Sanders, actor/director Marsha Nowik and actor Howard Shook, producer Kay Reimers, stage manager Amy Cunningham and actors Ali Thomas and Gary Reimers. Not pictured are actors Thor Sage, Brendan Sheehan and Troy Lindsay. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    The value of theater in a small town goes beyond entertainment; as well as providing something interesting to do on a weekend night, theater brings people together for a shared experience.

  • Solar project moves forward

    At their last meeting, Village Council members came close to backing away from a proposed solar farm in the village. But that changed at their April 4 meeting, after Council heard from an energy expert.

  • Tornado alert not up to speed

    Spring is tornado season, and forecasters say the Ohio Valley may be in the path of more severe weather than usual. Villagers would do well to consider their safety plans before the tornado warning sirens sound.