Articles by Lauren Heaton :: Page 60

  • Musical renewal for Havurah

    The spiritual activities of the Yellow Springs Havurah have always been done in an organized but less than dogmatic manner. The group of 15–20 active members observes the Sabbath each week on the Antioch College campus that informs its friendly tone.

  • Schools lose football and students

    The decision of the Yellow Springs High School administration not to field a football team this fall for the first time since 1993 has impacted the school community. While the low number of players ultimately forced the program’s closure earlier this month, at least one local student has since chosen to transfer to a school with an active football team, and several others are considering doing the same.

  • Scott named new Senior Center director

    Village native David Scott began his job as the new director of the Yellow Springs Senior Center on Monday, Aug. 23. (photo by Lauren Heaton)

    With 20 years of experience in historic preservation and nonprofit management, local resident David Scott took on the position of director of the Yellow Springs Senior Center last week.

  • YS schools make good grades, still need work

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    Preliminary results of the Ohio Achievement Tests that students took last spring indicated that Yellow Springs students are likely to score at least as well as or better than last year, according to new district Superintendent.

  • ‘Dog days

    Copies of this and other photographs may be purchased from the Yellow Springs News; please contact us via e-mail at ysnews {at} ysnews(.)com or by phone, between 9:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m., Mon.–Fri.

  • BLOG — Spice the new salt

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    I’ve had a long-term romance with Indian food. It stems from a time not so long ago that I developed a heart condition and was hospitalized at the University of Cincinnati with strict dietary restrictions on salt intake. Most of us don’t appreciate the complexity of salt and the deep dependency we have on it […]

  • Class of 2020 Initiative—Schools eye strategic plan

    Change in any organization can be brought about by a shift in leadership, a shift in demand for service, or a shift in budgetary balance, or, as in the case of the Yellow Springs Exempted School District, it can be induced by all three forces at once. This fall the district will tackle the Class of 2020 Initiative to formulate a strategic plan to guide the schools through the next 10 years.

  • All’s fair in cows and chickens

    Kaliyah Fulton led her holstein steer Frankie to a filtered watering hole at the Greene County Fair on Thursday in preparation for the big sale the following day. (photo by Lauren Heaton)

    In the shade of the barn at the Greene County Fair on Thursday, Yellow Springs youth tended to their animals between shows. The Husky Hustlers 4-H club was represented by Anna Semler, who brought two yearling heifers and two heifer calves. Also part of the club, Keturah, Corbett and Kaliyah Fulton were busy caring for […]

  • CATS to prowl distant streets

    Since the public bus system was abandoned in the early 1970s in favor of omnipresent personal vehicles, Yellow Springs has not had a regular public transportation system connecting it to towns and cities in the region. But starting this week, the Greene County Transit Board, known as Greene CATS, and several regional partners launched a one-day-a-week bus route…

  • BLOG—Mini pepper poppers, off book

    Lauren Heaton

    I’ve always known I would never be a real chef, simply because I move too cotton pickin’ slow in the kitchen. I’m messy as all get out too. But with me the mess is a symptom of the confusion I often feel when I’m trying to follow a recipe.

  • Yellow Springs kids play Fair to win

    Preparation for the annual Greene County Fair brings out the worker in Yellow Springs youth, who spend months to years on their living and non-living-projects. Above, Rachel Hammond and her dad Scott practiced leading Winnie, her year-old heifer who eats 25 pounds of grain a day and weighs in at 900 pounds. Below, Austin Pence nuzzled his heifer Mabel on his family’s 130-acre farm on Xenia Avenue just south of the Village water towers. The fair starts Sunday, Aug. 1. (photos by Lauren Heaton)

    At his family’s farm last week across from Dollar General, 16-year-old Austin Pence was using the cool of the dusk to wash and blow dry two of his favorite animals. Mabel, a year-old heifer, and Bart, a 17-month-old steer, hung by the white barn calm and collected as their black coats began to take on a fluffiness.

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