Articles by Lauren Heaton :: Page 65

  • Boys basketball team wins for fun

    Tied with Emmanuel Christian for number one in the Metro Buckeye Conference and holding up a 12–2 record three-fourths of the way through the season, this year’s Yellow Springs High School boys varsity basketball team has raised eyebrows. Having steadily improved their record each year since suffering a 3–16 season in 2007, the Bulldogs are charging into tournament time with ambitious sights set on state.

  • Diversity gap creates social divide

    When Isabel Newman graduated from Bryan High School in 1943, Antioch Bookplate President Ernest Morgan hired her to work for the company. Soon after, he sent her to a six-week course at the Mergenthaler linotype school in New York, and upon her return, she worked for the company for over 40 years, retiring as a manager. At that company, whose president actively promoted racial integration, she recalled that typically a fourth of the employees were minorities. The support for a racially diverse staff appeared to be the same at Vernay Laboratories, where two of Newman’s sisters worked, Yellow Springs Instruments and Antioch College, the place that bred all three companies and their socially minded leaders.

  • Business park’s widened road elicits concern

    The Village of Yellow Springs is considering a plan to create a new entrance off Dayton-Yellow Springs Road directly into the Center for Business and Education (CBE), the new business park created by Community Resources on the west edge of the village. Though the authority to approve the intersection rests with the Greene County Engineer, Village Council will discuss the proposal when the park, which was annexed into the village in 2005, comes up for approval as a subdivision later this year.

  • DeWines long committed to Haiti

    Before the earthquake, Haiti was a country that struggled to support human life. Haiti was already the poorest country in the Americas by most standards; 80 percent of the people lived in poverty and many of those were malnourished or infected with AIDS or other diseases. And in the capital city of Port-au-Prince, about 400,000 people lived in the squalor of a lowland trash dump besieged with standing water, through which rag-clad children would dig for their daily sustenance.

  • Lawyers offer foreclosure support

    For at least one Yellow Springs homeowner, the past year has been unforgettable. In the fall of 2008, his mortgage company granted him a three-month forbearance on the monthly payments for his home in the village. Having no steady income due to an ongoing health issue, the homeowner received a second forbearance in early 2009, and then was told in the spring that unless he could begin making his monthly $1,000 mortgage payments, the lender would begin foreclosure proceedings on his house.

  • TLT celebrates 20 years with stories of the land

    From the middle of a field, the land looks different than the view from the road. Seen from the land owner’s perspective, the way the growers see it, one can just begin to understand what the birds and foxes see — open space without borders. That is also perhaps the way that painters and poets see the land when they articulate why it is so loved and valued.

  • Bicycles, use the whole lane

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    Village Council’s goal to make Yellow Springs a more walkable and bikeable community prompted the Village Bicycle Enhancement Committee to take action on new traffic signs this fall and winter. The signs are a reminder that bicyclists are encouraged to use the entire lane.

    As head of the bike committee and an avid bicyclist himself, Dan Carrigan is passionate about educating both bikers and motorized drivers of the laws that give bicyclists greater rights and responsibilities.

    “As bicyclists, we’re being assertive,” he said. “The roads are a shared social network -— we all have a right to use them.”

  • Home, Inc. withdraws offer

    The Home, Inc. board of trustees decided last week to terminate its contract for a purchase option with Rabbit Run Farm on Dayton Street. Home, Inc. needed more time to establish a development partner for its housing project, and Rabbit Run owner Suzanne Patterson could not extend the option past the June 2010 limit specified in the contract signed in October.

  • College staff in South Hall; work on buildings progresses

    If in the past two years there had been urgency around what to do about Antioch College’s physical plant, this year, the attitude of college leaders has resolved into a tempered and reasoned approach to the historic campus. The college took critical steps this fall to protect its buildings from further deterioration, after they were shuttered for a year. And this month, the college administrative staff of about 20 will emerge from their spots in the Olive Kettering Library and the leased space on Xenia Avenue to take up temporary residence in South Hall on the horseshoe at the heart of the campus.

  • More villagers seeking help

    Consumers may have tightened their belts this whole past year, but the longer the financial slump continues, the harder it is for those living close to the bone to get by. An increase in the number of people served by a group of local organizations that provide emergency welfare help reflects the increased difficulty local residents are having getting enough warm winter wear, adequate heat in the house and ample food on the table. Especially in a giving season, the local welfare leaders extend a thanks for the generosity of the community and a note that in an economy such as this one, everyone is dealing with the loss in some measure.

  • Village seeks energy grant

    In the interest of supporting energy conservation measures, Village Council members agreed at a special meeting on Friday, Dec. 11, to sign the Village on as a municipal sponsor of a grant proposal to develop an affordable home retrofit process for energy efficiency. The Village will support Community Solutions and an area business in the application for federal stimulus grant money, which if awarded, will need further action by Council to participate in the program.

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