Articles by Lauren Heaton :: Page 70

  • ACE Task Force helps police

    On Wednesday and Thursday, Aug. 26 and 27, three Springfield residents were arrested in Yellow Springs for trafficking in cocaine and heroin. The Yellow Springs Police offered assistance in serving warrants and apprehending John E. Taylor, Gregory T. Rydell and Kareem Crosley. The incidents were sting operations using undercover operatives, and the lead agency conducting the so-called “roundup,” was the Greene County A.C.E. Task Force.

  • Fine local wines, engineered to taste

    In June Jim Brandeberry and his family opened Brandeberry Winery on their 10-acre farm on W. Jackson Road in Enon. Four miles from Yellow Springs, the winery is the closest producer of chardonnays, cabernets and sweeter berry wines within 40 miles of town.

    Most first-time visits to the new Brandeberry Winery in Enon include a tour of the production room simply because everyone wants to know — how does one make good wine from grapes grown in Ohio? A recent customer, who drove through fields of nine-foot corn last week to get to the 5118 W. Jackson Road farm, wasn’t leaving without the secret to the sauce.

  • New art, math is the focus at MLS

    As summer break comes to an end next week, students may not be aware that staff has been back for several weeks already preparing for an energetic return to school. With 359 students anticipated, the school is at near full capacity, Principal Christine Hatton said in an interview last week. First and fifth grades are […]

  • New dean, home room at YSHS

    Julie Speelman is the new dean of students and athletic diretor at YSHS and McKinney Middle School.

    When students arrive for their first day back to Yellow Springs High School and McKinney Middle School on Wednesday, Aug. 26, the first thing they will notice is a spritely young woman they don’t recognize greeting them at the door. They don’t know her yet, but by the end of the week they might feel like they’ve known Julie Speelman all their lives.

  • Recession knocks local nonprofits

    Almost a full year after the national economic seizure, nonprofit organizations in the village are feeling the squeeze in their budgets. The crash affected most markedly the heftily endowed, and it hurt most cruelly the service-oriented groups. While contraction to reduce expenditures is an option, many local nonprofits are choosing to maintain or expand their programs in hopes of riding out a temporary financial slump.

  • Flexibility is key for new arts center

    For theater professionals, the most important attribute of a new arts center facility would be flexibility, meaning that a ground floor performance space that could seat up to 300 could transform into an intimate, experimental stage with seating for 30.

  • Life’s richness continues at 100

    On Tuesday, July 21, longtime villager Ruth Bean celebrated her 100th birthday. She is shown here at a party held last Sunday at Ruth’s home at Friends Care Community Assisted Living, with longtime friend and fellow North Dakotan Bev Price.

    Ruth Bean has lived long and fully, from teaching in a midwest country school to walking among lions in Africa. And if she doesn’t remember every detail, given that it’s been 100 years this week since her beginning, she is happy to relive parts of that journey with visitors who do.

  • Cordell guilty in Harris death

    Just before his jury trial began on Monday, July 13, former Yellow Springs resident Phillip Cordell pled guilty to the 2004 murder of local resident Timothy Harris. Cordell, 48, was sentenced to a mandatory five years in prison, with no chance for judicial release, which is the maximum sentence for his plea, according to Greene County Prosecutor Suzanne Schmidt on Tuesday.

  • Stimulus money down the drain— Wastewater funds allocated

    The long-awaited improvements to the Village wastewater treatment plant have finally been funded and approved, and the Village received a permit to install the new equipment this week. The $2.64 million project will be funded by state and federal stimulus grants and is expected to be completed by late 2010.

  • Land plan to manage growth

    Open farmland is a precious feature of Miami Township, whose vast fields, streams and wooded areas many of its residents recognize as valuable and would like to keep. So they’re doing something about it by creating a land use plan for the township, which surrounds Yellow Springs, in hopes of guiding future development practices that preserve and protect its natural resources.

  • Outdoor sculpture contest winners — Public art to go public in October

    Local artists Beth Holyoke and Migiwa Orimo (shown sitting along the bike path on the newest tiled bench by Holyoke and local artist Kaethi Seidl) are two of the three winners of the recent Yellow Springs Outdoor Sculpture competition, sponsored by the Yellow Springs Arts Council, the Yellow Springs Center for the Arts Steering Committee and the Community Information Project. The third winner is Olga Ziemska of Cleveland. By the Fall Street Fair, public artwork by all three artists will be on display around the village.

    Most art is meant to be viewed by the public, but not all art takes up permanent residence in the public sphere in the way the three pieces that won the village’s first public sculpture contest are about to do. But come Street Fair time in early October, three public spaces in the village will display Beth Holyoke’s three-dimensional yellow mosaic of the word “springs,” Olga Ziemska’s sculpture of the hands of villagers cast in white in the image of a bird in flight, and Migiwa Orimo’s old-style telephone booth that beckons villagers to come inside and create their own experimental artworks.

The forecast for 45387 by WP Wunderground