Articles by Lauren Heaton :: Page 72

  • A 10-day taste of Yellow Springs

    A village-wide collaboration of nearly 20 local organizations, the Yellow Springs Experience week, featuring educational and cultural workshops, will take place July 9–18. Shown above are organizers, from left to right in the back row, Carole Braun of the Yellow Springs Arts Council, Lisa Hunt of YS Kids Playhouse, Nick Gaskins of Bing Design, Krista Magaw of Tecumseh Land Trust, and Tom Brookey of Antioch College. In the middle row are Anita Brown of the Arts Council, Laura Carlson of the Center for the Arts and Little Art Theatre, Karen Wintrow of Chamber of Commerce, Jerome Borchers of the Center for the Arts and Iris Weisman of Antioch University McGregor and the Antioch Writers’ Workshop. In the front row are Fred Bartenstein of Facilitators Without Borders and Kathy Reed of the Arts Council.

    A brave group of people, under the guidance of the Yellow Springs Arts Council, are designing a 10-day cultural tasting event this summer called the Yellow Springs Experience to celebrate core strengths of the Village and gauge their ability to generate revenue for the town.

  • Two seek radical change

    YSHS 2010 Valedictorian John Michael Malone and Salutatorian Dylan Amlin

    Friends and classmates since they were in elementary school at Mills Lawn, the Yellow Springs High School class of 2010 valedictorian John Michael Malone and salutatorian Dylan Amlin have plans. But they’re not plans in the typical sense. In fact, beyond college, their plans hinge precisely on not having a defined path with goals that would lead them to a job, a house and “settling down.”

  • YSHS students recognized for achievements

    2010 National Honor Society members

    As is the tradition in May of every year, Yellow Springs High School recognized many of its students, especially its seniors, at the annual National Honor Society scholarship awards ceremony.

  • BLOG – Schools could cultivate a lunchtime education

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    When I was a student at Mills Lawn, back in the day as they say, my mom was kind enough to pack my lunches every morning. I never wanted to buy lunch, partly because I was too scared to tell the lunch ladies what I wanted, but also because I was never sure what exactly was on those trays.

  • Economic sustainability—A matchmaker for business

    Sarah Wildman (photo by Diane Chiddister)

    Sarah Wildman likes small towns. She grew up in one in Illinois, and she left big city life to spend the past 20 years raising a family in another one just north of Yellow Springs.

  • Youth give back to their Glen Helen

    Gently holding Amos before a group of area church youth who stopped by Trailside unexpectedly on Saturday, Joe Plumer explained what Glen Helen’s box turtle likes to eat and how to bathe him in warm water. Plumer has helped pioneer a new program at the Glen utilizing youth and an adult mentor as docents for the Glen. Volunteer Deborah Dillon, holding vitamins for Amos, has worked with Plumer for two years. (photo by Lauren Heaton)

    Glen Helen volunteer Deborah Dillon didn’t much care for snakes when she started welcoming visitors at Trailside Museum five years ago. But then Joe Plumer, who was 9 at the time and passionate about amphibians, opened her eyes to the fascinating lives that snakes of all kinds lead.

  • Birding by ear, Glen tallies 80 species

    A great horned own perched in the cavity of a sycamore along the river in the south Glen about two weeks ago, waiting like the mice it hunts for spring to warm all creatures out of their hovels. (photo by Patricia Perry)

    Though the whipping, chilly wind didn’t feel like early May, the birds of Glen Helen puffed out their down and went ahead and sang anyway for the fourth annual Make It Count for the Birds fundraiser bird count on Saturday.

  • Building expression

    Bruce Parker carefully cultivated this original species of orange, red and blue Whimsical Recycled Kinetic art. (photo by Lauren Heaton)

    On a very windy Saturday, the petaled wheels of Bruce Parker’s Whimsical Recycled Kinetic Art were spinning in ways other flowers just don’t do.

  • Antioch University refocuses on adult education

    Under the leadership of Chancellor Toni Murdock, Antioch University spent the past year restructuring the administration of its satellite campuses and learning to function as "a university of one." (Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    No longer limited to just the physical campuses, Antioch University is exploring how to increase capacity by making the strengths of each campus available to the university as a whole. Click on the headline to read the story.

  • AU refocusing on adult education

    Under the leadership of Chancellor Toni Murdock, Antioch University spent the past year restructuring the central administration and management of its satellite campuses. After officially separating from Antioch College last summer, the university is now a five-campus school focused on developing and broadening its degree completion and graduate degree programs.

    Eight months after severing ties to the college that bred it, Antioch University is looking deeply at itself and clarifying its mission as a single system that serves adult students at multiple campuses around the country.