Articles by Lauren Heaton :: Page 77

  • Village seeks energy grant

    In the interest of supporting energy conservation measures, Village Council members agreed at a special meeting on Friday, Dec. 11, to sign the Village on as a municipal sponsor of a grant proposal to develop an affordable home retrofit process for energy efficiency. The Village will support Community Solutions and an area business in the application for federal stimulus grant money, which if awarded, will need further action by Council to participate in the program.

  • Benning served village in work, life

    Village Council Clerk Deborah Benning, right, with her mother, the late Etta Belle Harris. Deborah died on Nov. 24 of ovarian cancer.

    For each of the several hundred people who attended her memorial service at Bryan Community Center on Saturday, Dec. 5, Deborah Benning meant something unique. But in all her roles as mother, step-mother, partner, friend, Village Council clerk and long-time village resident, she was consistently seen as a supportive leader and a touchstone others could depend on. She served in that way for family and friends as well as for the Village of Yellow Springs, and her death on Nov. 24 is as much a part of local history as the legacy of her family as an early part of the village’s African American community.

  • Derr tapped as interim college head

    The Antioch College Board Pro Tempore announced on Wednesday, Dec. 9, the appointment of Matthew Derr as the college’s interim president. Derr was the chief transition officer who helped lead the two-year effort to win the college’s independence from Antioch University this past summer.

  • Plug pulled on power plant

    The Village made what some would call a wise and prescient decision last year when it declined to sign on to the coal-fired power plant American Municipal Power, Inc. planned to build along the Ohio River. AMP announced last week on Nov. 25 that it was terminating the AMPGS project due to a spike in construction cost estimates that rendered the project unaffordable for its customers.

  • Parents start local Montessori

    Chaos reigned on a recent Wednesday in the Bryan Center gym, where a toddler play group meets each week. Balls were flying and kids caromed off of each other as mothers stood by watchfully. Then a box of curious looking toys were spread out, and one by one, the children came to sit on their mats and check out the shapes, colors and moving parts of the materials before them. The children were rapt, and according to Nacim Sajabi, they were learning in the Montessori model.

  • With assistance, business can thrive in Yellow Springs

    According to the most recent business survey update sponsored by Yellow Springs Community Resources, the village is a pretty good place to do business. Business owners like the village’s location, personality and walkability, and even in a slumped economy, a number of local outfits plan to expand here. But business owners also perceive barriers to growth, including the cost of doing business in the village, the lackluster appearance of the central business district and the age-old concern with lack of parking space downtown.

  • Home, Inc. has option on Rabbit Run

    The historically green space at Rabbit Run farm that is alternately high-touch vegetable garden and brambly wildbrush, home to fox, deer and, of course, lots of rabbits, may be in for a change. Last month, Home, Inc. bought an option to purchase the 7.5-acre farm on Dayton Street to accommodate what the housing group hopes will be its first mixed-income, energy-efficient development project.

  • Levy supports local seniors

    Thanks to the senior service levy, Yellow Springs senior Grace Funderburg, right, can get help from local resident Mary Peterson to clean her home once a week and receive rides from Yellow Springs Senior Center volunteers to run errands. Voters will decide whether to replace the 1-mill Greene County senior services levy in the Nov. 3 election.

    Every Monday morning, 85-year old resident Grace Funderburg gets help cleaning her house on Lisa Lane. Local resident Mary Peterson comes over to vacuum and dust, and the two often share stories about the village they raised their children in. Several times a week Funderburg also gets a ride to town from a volunteer driver […]

  • Candidates discuss stronger schools

    During an election forum at the Presbyterian Church on Sunday, Oct. 25, seven candidates for Yellow Springs school board shared their views on issues from improving student engagement to the impending change in school leadership.

  • Top library hopes for support

    Call him crazy, but Greene County Public Library Director Karl Colón believes that the library ought to serve the taxpayers who support it. When the people said in a 2005 survey that they wanted more youth programs, better communication and a bigger collection, the Yellow Springs library started console game madness for teens, gussied up its newsletter and Web site and started ordering more books.