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04
2015
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Articles by Megan Bachman :: Page 2

  • Kula means community + yoga

    A group of local yoga teachers — along with dance, fitness and drumming practitioners — recently formed the Kula Cooperative, a collaborative offering classes for adults and children at the Casa de Paz retreat space on Corry Street. Members are, from left, in front, Nicole Manieri with son Gabriel Manieri, Marcia Sauer and Amy Chavez; second row, Kim Krier and Jill Becker; third row, administrator Sandy Riorden, Katy Gaines and Carmen Milano. Members not pictured are Paula Hurwitz, Melissa Tinker, Larissa McHugh, Leslie Dworkin, Liz Sanchez and Linda Hamilton. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    A new door has opened in the Kula Cooperative, a collaborative of local yoga and movement teachers who say they are creating a “new model” based upon shared ownership, affordable rates and community-based practice.

  • Teaching justice, peace and protest

    Local resident Talis X was arrested last weekend at protests over the acquittal of a Cleveland police officer of charges stemming from a 2012 shooting of an unarmed black couple. Talis X will speak about his experiences with police violence and injustice at an Antioch College teach-in on mass incarceration and prison justice Saturday, May 30, from 1 to 4 p.m. in McGregor 113. (Still photo from CNN video)

    Local landscaper Talis X spent Memorial Day weekend in a Cleveland jail after leading a spontaneous street protest on Saturday when a judge acquitted a white Cleveland police officer in the 2012 shooting of an unarmed black couple.

  • Bulldogs sign, move up to college

    YSHS senior athletes continuing in their sport at the college level were honored at a signing ceremony at the high school this week. From left are soccer player Jared Scarfpin, Mount Vernon Nazarene University, softball players Jesi Worsham and Chelsea Horton, Clark State Community College and soccer player Ian Chick, Sewanee: The University of the South. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Four Yellow Springs High School senior athletes will play their sports at the college level next year.

  • June 4, 2015 Bulldog sports round-up

    Sophomore track athlete Julie Roberts ran the 300-meter hurdles to a seventh-place finish in the regional finals last weekend. She ran the race in in 48.75 seconds. (Submitted photo by Coach Peter Dierauer)

    June 4, 2015 Bulldog sports round-up

  • ‘Shout’ in the streets

    Local yoga teacher and choreographer Katy Gaines led the group of local seniors in the dance, which they learned at previous rehearsals. Last year seniors boogied to “I Heard it Through the Grapevine.” (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Last week the Yellow Springs Senior Center organized a flash mob dance to the Isley Brothers 1959 hit “Shout” to commemorate National Senior Health and Fitness Day.

  • Hurdlers excel at regional track meet

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    Hurdlers Julie Roberts and Kaner Butler scored at this weekend’s regional track and field meet, but did not advance to state.

  • YSHS athletes advance to regionals

    YSHS track and field athlete Ed Johnson sprinted the last leg of the 4x400-meter relay at last week’s district meet. Johnson helped his team clinch third place and qualify for regionals with a time of 45.78 seconds. Olivia Brintlinger-Conn cleared a hurdle on her way to a regional qualification last week. At the high school district track and field meet, Brintlinger-Conn finished fourth in the 300-meter hurdles in 49.53 seconds to advance to regionals. (Left photo by Tim Sherwood; right photo by Jesi Worsham)

    Yellow Springs High School track and field teams — both boys and girls — are sending more athletes on to regionals than at any time in the last 25 years.

  • Yellow Springs Police survey results—A desire for community engagement

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    Three-quarters of respondents in a survey on police and the Village said they would like the police to engage with the community more often, including by patrolling more on bicycle and foot instead of in their cruisers and visiting schools to speak with students.

  • Local policing survey results

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    A desire for more engagement between the police and the community was at the top of a list of suggestions for the Yellow Springs Police Department in a recent online survey. Overall, respondents said they were satisfied with the YSPD, while numerous cited their concerns.

  • News survey— Village police elicit mixed responses

    In a recent YS News online survey, nearly two-thirds of respondents reported they were very satisfied or somewhat satisfied with the Yellow Springs Police Department. Comparatively, 92 percent said the same in a 2005 Village random mail survey. While it may point to a downward trend in satisfaction, the discrepancy may be due to the News survey being self-selected, online, and focused solely on policing. (Source: Yellow Springs News online survey)

    Some villagers fear for their own safety because they believe the Yellow Springs Police Department unfairly targets them. Others believe the police force is so professional and respectful that any critique of the force is unjustified.