Articles by Megan Bachman :: Page 32

  • Warmer, retro sound for Wheels

    Local band Wheels, here performing at Toxic Beauty Records on National Record Store Day in April, recently released a seven-inch vinyl single through Toxic Beauty’s new record label. From left are band members Sam Salazar, Jaime Scott, Rory Papania, Conor Stratton and Sam Crawford. (Submitted photo by Toxic Beauty Records)

    For most of the rock ‘n’ roll era, bands delivered their new music as singles on seven-inch vinyl records. One Yellow Springs band is now reviving the analog record in defiance of today’s digital standards,

  • Group urges setting precedent in opposing oil, gas drilling

    Yellow Springs may be the first community in Ohio to ban oil and gas drilling and waste wells within its municipal limits using a rights-based ordinance.

  • Marx Bros meets Mozart in YSKP show

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    This year’s YSKP show mixes an 18th century opera, a Marx Brothers’ film, Art Speak from the walls of the Chicago Art Institute, and Justin Bieber’s twitter feed.

  • Village Fam hosts summer jam

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    Local hip hop group The Village Fam is doing more for the Yellow Springs music scene than laying down beats and rhymes.

  • Show your Pride this weekend

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    Yellow Springs Pride will hold its first annual gay pride weekend this Saturday and Sunday.

  • Glen Helen kicks off series on environment— Thinking many generations ahead

    CarolCarolyn Raffensperger, here speaking at a TED event in Maui, Hawaii, will lecture on Friday at 7 p.m. in the Glen Helen Auditorium on the precautionary principle as a way to stem the environmental pollution that threatens the lives of future generations. (Submitted photo)yn Raffensperger`

    Not only does U.S. law not protect Americans seven generations from now, it allows the continued creation of environmental toxins that will be hazardous to those in the ten-thousandth generation, according to environmental lawyer Carolyn Raffensperger.

  • No such thing as a typical day

    At the “Antioch Today” panel at this weekend’s Antioch College alumni reunion, students, staff and faculty reflected on the trials and triumphs of college life in the middle of the revived school’s first academic year. From left, are Assistant Professor of Philosophy Lewis Trelawny-Cassity, student Maya Lundgren, Resident Life Manager Randle Charles and student Guy Matthews. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    At last weekend’s Antioch College reunion, students, staff and faculty painted a picture of current college life for Antiochians past.

  • Fracking forum to push for YS ban

    West Bay Exploration, a Michigan oil and gas company, had received a permit from the Ohio Department of Natural Resources to drill an exploratory oil well on a Miami Township property. Shown is a temporary drilling rig in southern Michigan, which is somewhat larger than what would be used in this area. (Submitted photo by West Bay Exploration)

    Environmental experts will share ways Yellow Springs can avoid contamination from oil and gas drilling and fracking waste wells at a forum on Saturday.

  • ‘Our Town’ comes to our town

    Our Town characters gather for the wedding of Emily Webb and George Gibbs, center, played by Jeanna Breza and Colton Pitstick. Center Stage’s production of Our Town runs June 22–23 and 29–30 in Westminster Hall in the First Presbyterian Church, with shows starting at 8 p.m. Other community cast members are, from left, in back, Duard Headley III, Lara Bentley, Thor Sage, Howard Shook, Thomas Siebold; in front, Lucas Sansom, Sarah Wildman, Ellen Ballerene; behind the couple is Ali Thomas; on right is Robert Campbell, Juno Shemano and Miriam Eckenrode. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Thornton Wilder may have had a place like Yellow Springs in mind when he wrote his 1938 play ‘Our Town.’

  • New owners for downtown building

    The new owners of the Kings building, left to right: Molly Lunde and Lee Kibblewhite, Brendan Comerford and Christy Lewis. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    One of the oldest downtown buildings is now in new hands. Four local people last week purchased the property at 228 Xenia Avenue, currently home to Sam & Eddie’s Open Books and Asanda Imports.

  • GMHA gardens on chopping block

    Daniel Pearson planted a low-maintenance cover crop of violets in the backyard of his Lawson Place residence. The violets don’t need to be mowed, keep the ground from getting waterlogged and provide a tasty treat to Pearson, he said. Pearson worries herbicides will be used to kill the vegetation, which is out of compliance with the property owners, Greene Metropolitian Housing Authority. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Patricia High is dejected because she has until July 1 to transplant most of her beautiful garden at her Lawson Place unit, or the Greene Metropolitan Housing Authority will remove the plantings.

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