Articles by Megan Bachman :: Page 63

  • Forests for local food

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    Mark Shepard told a crowd of 120 villagers to transform our farm fields into forests for more local food.

  • Antioch College— Contemplating mindfulness

    Robert Pryor, Al Denman, Katie Egart, Dianea Wanicek, Amy Maruyama (by Megan Bachman)

    Stop. Close your eyes. Now envision an Antioch College where students are challenged to contemplate as well as analyze — to understand the outer world and reflect on the inner.

  • Kids wellness day at Children’s Center

    Organizing a kids wellness day at the Community Children's Center are chiropractor Erika Gushon, left, and massage therapist Keri Speck, here holding a triangle pose with their kids Isaac Gushon and Izanna Speck. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Local health practitioners Erika Grushon and Keri Speck have organized a kid’s wellness day on holistic health alternatives for children.

  • Contemplative education at Antioch

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    At “Green Space for the Mind,” on Saturday, April 9, at Antioch South Hall’s Herndon Gallery, leading scholars will report on their efforts to incorporate contemplative practices into higher education.

  • Gardens, gardeners sprouting

    At the Bill Duncan Park neighborhood garden, Penny Adamson (left) and Emily Seibel prepared their garden bed, which last year produced five kinds of tomatoes, prolific green beans and other vegetables and flowers. Villagers can still sign up for a plot at one of four neighborhood gardens. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    What began as a modest effort to start a community garden has mushroomed to four neighborhood gardens scattered around town — with more soon to sprout.

  • McKee group hosts housing talk

    About 50 villagers attended last Sunday’s forum on affordable housing, sponsored by the James A. McKee Association and featuring a presentation by local land trust organization Home, Inc. Shown above are, from left in front, Nancy Noonan, Kent Bristol, Al Schlueter and Dave Turner; in back, Brian Upchurch and McKee group president Rick Kristensen. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Many questions were raised at a public meeting last Sunday sponsored by the James A. McKee Association, when representatives from Home, Inc. shared plans for an affordable housing project slated for Village-owned land on Cemetery Street.

  • Bulldog sports spring into action

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    The spring sports season kicked off this week. See the calendar of games, matches and meets and come cheer on your Bulldogs.

  • Expressing the inexpressable through dance

    More than 50 local dancers will perform original pieces at the Yellow Springs Community Dance Concert on Friday and Saturday, March 25–26, at 7 p.m. at Antioch’s South Gym. Dancers at a recent rehearsal are, in the front row from left to right, Emma Sturm, Theresa Thinnes, Lara Bauer, Andrea Hutson, Anna McClure, Tricia Gelmini, Erin Wolf; middle row, Jade Turner, Kira Plumer, Savanna Amos, Jennifer Johnson, Victoria Walters, Carrie Speck, Nicole Manieri, Marybeth Wolf, Miriam Eckenrode; back row, Acala Cresci, Greta Hill, Aaron Logan, Amanda Hanisch, Ali Thomas and Charlotte Walkey (obscured). (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Movement can convey more emotion than words. Just watch dancer and choreographer Tricia Gelmini, whose piece at this weekend’s community dance concert will blend sorrow and joy in an expression of loss.

  • Minister passionate about justice

    Joe Hinds was chosen as the First Presbyterian Church’s new part-time pastor in January. The church will welcome Hinds and celebrate its recent sanctuary renovations at a worship service on Sunday, March 27, at 10:30 a.m. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Now preaching from the pulpit of the First Presbyterian church, new pastor Joe Hinds has a Southern accent and a passion for social justice.

  • State cuts have local budget impact

    Local institutions are reeling from the release of Gov. John Kasich’s biennial budget last week, which proposes funding cuts for local governments, schools, libraries and elder care facilities.

  • Garden with your neighbors

    Al Schlueter spaded new beds last weekend at the Fair Acres neighborhood garden, where he has a plot. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Villagers can sign up to garden at one of four neighborhood garden plots around town — Bill Duncan Park, the Glass Farm, Fair Acres and Friends Care — where last year more than 50 families tilled and tended beds together.

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