Articles by Megan Bachman :: Page 75

  • Schools get a “green” makeover

    Solar shades will soon adorn the southern facade of the high school to cut the demand for mechanical cooling. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    New for the 2010 school year is an energy-efficiency makeover at all three school buildings and an energy curriculum to match.

  • A group to support greening

    Kate LeVesconte showed off her garden and brand new bicycle carrier, which she fills with groceries from town for carbon-free transport to her home on Glen View Road. LeVesconte shares these energy conservation techniques at monthly meetings of the Ten Percent Club. (photo by Megan Bachman)

    Clinical psychologist Kate LeVesconte knows that support groups encourage positive behavior. So when she became concerned about the dangers of carbon fuel use, LeVesconte co-created an energy conservation support group, where people help each other live more sustainably.

  • Commissions make a difference

    Village commissions, staffed by appointed citizens and elected officials, are fundamental to the functioning of Village government. While the Planning Commission, Board of Zoning Appeals, Community Access Panel, and Economic Sustainability Commission are not currently seeking volunteers, they offer opportunity for direct citizen involvement in governmental affairs.

  • Alum brings innovative theater

    As an Antioch student in the mid-1980s, Mark Greenfield staged theater productions on the college golf course, inside the mail room, and during board of trustees’ meetings. Now Greenfield returns to Yellow Springs to teach a workshop on producing theater in non-traditional and outdoor settings and put on Oedipus Rex in the Antioch amphitheater.

  • Antioch alum presents theater workshop, Oedipus Rex

    Members of the New York city-based Faux-Real Theater Company rehearsed for a production of "Oedipus Rex," to be held at the Antioch amphitheater on Aug. 20, 21 and 22. Roles in the all-male cast are available for local actors, in addition to spaces in a local workshop with the director, Antioch graduate Mark Greenfield. (Submitted Photo by Jeff Wood).

    Antioch alum Mark Greenfield returns to Yellow Springs to host a workshop on putting on theater productions in outdoor and non-traditional venues and to stage his rendition of “Oedipus Rex” in the Antioch amphitheater.

  • Rolling Pen Book and Cafe to serve up inspiring titles, cobbler

    Brenda Stone Browder, a Springfield native and author, opened her new bookstore, The Rolling Pen Book Cafe at 111 Corry Street. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    The Rolling Pen Book Cafe, now open in the former home of Dolbeer’s Cleaners, is a place to relax, read a book and enjoy a cup of coffee with some homemade cobbler.

  • Ice cream social fun for children and seniors

    Volunteer Devin Massie chats with Friends Care residents happily consuming their ice cream at the annual ice cream social. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Crowds came for the free ice cream, face painting, balloons and carriage rides at Friends Care Community Center’s annual summer ice cream social last Sunday. Revived last year, the tradition dates back decades as a community event organized by the 33-year old senior institution.

  • Forest gardens in your own yard

    Permaculturist Dave Jacke hugged a stinging nettle plant at a farm homestead on Hustead Road, where he will teach a seven-day workshop on creating edible forest gardens next week. Jacke will also give a free public lectures at the Glen Helen building on homescale food production and enhancing soil fertility on Aug. 9 and 11.

    Growing food in a backyard garden can be a lot of work. But by designing a “forest garden” of trees and shrubs, aligned with ecological principles, gardeners can achieve a food yield sustainably, with less maintenance. This is the essence of a seven-day forest gardening workshop from Aug. 9 to Aug. 15 on a farm homestead north of Yellow Springs on Hustead Road…

  • YS Experience deemed success

    Doug Christen of Smaller Footprint Organics, a three-acre farm two miles north of Yellow Springs, shares his approach to sustainable farming at a tour of local farms organized as part of the Yellow Springs Experience by the Tecumseh Land Trust.

    That Yellow Springs would attract visitors to arts, wellness and eco-tourism activities didn’t surprise the organizers of the Yellow Springs Experience. But the nearly 20 local organizations that put together the 10-day educational event in mid-July did learn ways to improve upon its first effort.

  • Big trees wanted in the village

    Yellow Springs Tree Committee members Macy Reynolds, left, and Kathy Beverly are part of a summer effort by the committee to identify the biggest trees in the village. Villagers are invited to submit their contenders for the town’s biggest trees by calling Beverly at 767-2586.

    This summer the Yellow Springs Tree Committee is scouring the community for the next state champion tree. Several weeks ago, committee members Kathy Beverly and Macy Reynolds measured a 37-inch-circumference shagbark hickory at Mills Lawn School and a 55-inch-circumference oak tree on the Antioch campus, the largest yet.

  • In search of big trees

    Macy Reynolds, left, and Kathy Beverly of the Tree Committee measured the large oaks, hickories and locust trees of Mills Lawn on a recent summer day. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    It’s no a surprise that Yellow Springs has an abundance of large trees. This summer the Yellow Springs Tree Committee seeks the largest in their update to a 1972 report, “The big trees of Yellow Springs.” See a 1972 map of the largest trees in Yellow Springs here.

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