Articles by Sehvilla Mann :: Page 2

  • Volunteers work to restore Antioch

    Volunteers helping to restore Antioch College’s infrastructure have a new working base: the Maples fire station on Livermore Street, which once housed Antioch’s fire department and more recently was used for storage.

  • Local women who make a difference

    Top row from left to right: Beth Rubin, Macy Reynolds, Rebecca Morgann, Sandy McHugh, and Naomi Ewald-Orme. Bottom row from left to right: Susan Stiles, Carla Steiger and Carol Cottom. (Photo by Sehvilla Mann)

    The organizers of 100 Women Making a Difference in Greene County want to make a difference in the lives of community members by donating most effectively to the nonprofits who serve them.

  • Scented organic soap, naturally made

    A soap maker for more than 20 years, Chris Entler and his partner, Jessica Wyant, recently opened the Soap Bar in Kings Yard, in the space behind Asanda Imports that was once the bar of the old Winds Cafe. Entler uses organic and natural ingredients in his products, which he has previously sold only at the street fair and Kings Yard farmers market. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    Recently Chris Entler could be found in his new soap shop and studio in Kings Yard working on a new challenge: creating, with spearment leaves, an intricate design in a soap bar.

  • A Strong passion for the letterpress

    Artist Sarah Strong is shown with the letterpress in her village studio.

    The letterpress in Sarah Strong’s studio, a sleek machine with levers and rollers fitted into a corner along the western wall, stands out.

  • Senior cycling champ retires at 77

    Richard Simons, shown above, recently retired at age 77 from competitive bicycle racing, in which he won many titles.

    “Whether you think you can do something or not, you’re probably right.” With this paraphrase of a quote from Henry Ford, 77-year-old champion cyclist Richard Simons sums up the attitude he credits with earning him scores of race victories and multiple world records.

  • Living green at Purple Moon Farm

    Sophie Entler and some of her hoofed friends at the Purple Moon Farm, which her parents, James Entler and Jessica Wyant, run on Meredith Road.

    On a recent afternoon, the sheep and goats at Purple Moon Farm are dozing in their pens. A hen wanders by, two middle-sized chicks close behind her; other chickens rest in the shade of the raspberry bushes planted in parallel rows.

  • New creative cycle for musician

    Longtime local musician Carl Schumacher, who grew up in Yellow Springs, has launched the New Schu band, a new creative endeavor that plays at the Emporium the first Friday of every month. (photo by Sehvilla Mann)

    With a couple of old projects winding up and several new ones budding, local musician Carl Schumacher says he finds himself at the beginning of a “new creative cycle.” Interest is building in his recently-formed band New Schu, a “new configuration” of the previous Carl Schumacher Band.

  • Anthropologist studies island AIDS

    Township resident Lawrence Hammer, an anthropologist, recently published Sin, Sex and Stigma: A Pacific Response to HIV and AIDS, a book that recounts his research on Papua New Guinea. He’s shown signing his books at a recent reading in Xenia.

    Of the 26 countries in the insular Pacific, Papua New Guinea has the highest rate of HIV infection: 98 to 99 percent of new cases occur there, according to anthropologist and Wittenberg professor Lawrence Hammar. Yet, he said, the state can’t effectively address the problem because it fears offending outside aid organizations…

  • Looking at Yellow Springs through our elders’ eyes

    Local videographer Patti Dallas and Jeri Lyn Studebaker are working to complete a new series of interviews with local elders. The first segment will screen at the Little Art Theatre on Saturday, July 24, 4 p.m.

    In 1999 local filmmaker Patti Dallas produced “A Portrait of Yellow Springs Through the Eyes of Our Elders,” a documentary for which she interviewed 17 individuals aged 75 and older. The elders spoke to themes such as the village’s early history, local resources such as Glen Helen and Antioch College, and the landmarks of Yellow Springs.

  • Sculptor inspired by clay, politics

    Local sculptor Alice Robrish is shown in her Dayton Street studio, where she’s working on a series of busts of Afghan schoolgirls.

    The building on Dayton Street looks like an unassuming garage, set well back from the street. Look closely, though, and you might notice the tables and shelves inside. This is in fact an artist’s studio, converted from a garage to a work space by local sculptor Alice Robrish.