Articles by Stephanie Beasley

More Articles by Stephanie Beasley
  • Herbs, healing at new store

    Glenda Prado recently opened Botanica Pusanga at 108 Dayton Street, where she will sell Peruvian herbs and healing.

    Glenda Prado had always been skeptical of shamanic healing practices. As a child growing up in Ecuador, she had watched her mother and grandmother use plants and herbs for medicinal and spiritual purposes, yet she refused to adhere to their vocation. “I didn’t believe it,” Prado said. “I thought it was foolish — my mother working with shamanic herbs.”

  • College welcomes dancers back

    This weekend’s Community Dance Concert, to take place at the Antioch College south gym, will feature a wide array of villagers, including those in the photo. In the back row, from left, are Curtis Bliss, holding his son, Braiden, Stefan Turner, Amanda Hamisch and Brendan Sheehan. In the second row, from left, are Kristen Foster and Elizabeth Lutz (seated on suitcases), Amelia Tarpey (behind suitcase), Helen Reed, Jade Turner, Lucas Mulhall, Savana Amos and Charlotte Walkey. In the front row are Arielle Johnson, Jennifer Johnson, Liam Lutz, Marta Mari-Crocker and Aidan Lutz. (photo by Diane Chiddister)

    After nearly a decade of success under the guidance of Valerie Blackwell-Truitt, the Yellow Springs Community Dance Concert has a new face — three new faces, to be exact.

  • Wright’s lifelong love for Japanese poetry across the ages

    Harold Wright has what is sometimes referred to as a “hard head.” The stubbornness of this 79-year-old retired college professor has been one of few consistencies in a life that has taken him to places as distant as Hawaii, Tokyo and New York City.

  • Short films debut at Little Art

    011410_filmfest

    Filmmaker and villager Vanessa Query, left, has organized a festival of original short films that will be shown at the Little Art Theatre at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 21. She is shown with Little Art -Executive Director Jenny Cowperthwaite, who is enthusiastic about providing a venue for independent filmmakers.

  • Church harbors a market in winter

    While church basements tend to be the place for after-service coffee hours and socials, the basement of the Yellow Springs United Methodist Church will soon veer off the traditional path and host vegetables. Beginning this Saturday, Jan. 9, from 9 a.m. to noon, the church will sponsor its first winter farmers market.

  • Builders make aesthetic efficient

    Local business partners Erik and Deirdre Owen, left, and Ron Stickelman are finishing construction on the first spec home of their new development business, the Bau Wow Company. The home on King Street near Dayton Street is a modest-sized energy efficient home that the builders hope to sell and potentially reproduce.

    In many classic children’s stories, seemingly common and mundane entrances disguise the most fantastical places. For Alice, the gateway to Wonderland was through a rabbit hole, while the four Pevensie siblings discovered the bewitching world of Narnia through an old wardrobe. The driveway to Erik and Deirdre Owen’s home is no different. Looking (and feeling) […]

  • Malagasy student visits YS

    Jalana Lazar’s stint with the Peace Corps in Madagascar began inauspiciously. On her first day in the country, she was driven to the village of Nosiarina and dropped off with little fanfare. Remembering her initial dismay, she said, “They left me on the side of the road with a bike and my steel trunk.” She figured out the logistics of her new life on her own.

  • YS band rocks through ages

    The abundance of musicians and music lovers is part of what makes the village unique, and among those bands, one stands out, not only for its music, but also because of its history.

  • Red carpet for film biz partners

    There are many differences in the lives of good friends Diana Scott and Donna Lynn Johnson. A practicing nurse as well as the owner of Scott Street Tavern in Springfield, Scott is also a film student at Wright State University and the mother of two children. Johnson has a teenage son and is the owner of the Main Squeeze on Xenia Avenue. In her spare time, she runs a food consulting company and previously held positions with companies like Dole and Safeway Manufacturing in her native California.

    There is, however, something that is bringing these two seemingly divergent lives together: a joint venture that they have named Mad River Films.

  • Yellow Springs as retreat for women

    The local artist and new business owner is working to make sure that desire becomes a reality with Getaways for Women, a retreat service that she hopes will introduce area women to the village’s many resources.

    With all the abundance and richness in town, “I’m like a connector,” Mellon said. “I’m a local host.”

  • Rita Caz store glitters and grows

    When Rita Caz Jewelry Gallery moved in April from its cozy yet too-small abode in the corner of Kings Yard to a roomier space next door, it was more than a relocation. It was an upgrade.

12

Our weather forecast is from Wordpress Weather