Articles by Susan Gartner :: Page 2

  • Traveling tales in the ‘Box’

    StoryBox Project ambassadors, from back, left to right, Jonatha and Harold Wright and Yellow Springs Community Library Head Librarian Connie Collett pose with the Yellow Springs StoryBox box, created by Corrine Bayraktaroglu (front, left) and Nancy Mellon. Submissions for the StoryBox project can be put into the box, on display at the library, until April 30.

    Children aren’t the only ones who appreciate a well-told story. Bedtime stories, love stories, scary stories told around a campfire, folk and fish and fairy tales have, since human life began, entertained and educated young and old alike.

  • Plucky harpists learn some string theory at Antioch School

    Artist-in-residence Holly Pratt spent a week at The Antioch School sharing her love of harp music and history. Pictured are students Landon Rhoads (far left), Danny Grote, Cecila Comerford and Francesca Brecha.

    The children sat on a rug in a semicircle around the visiting harpist in the art/science room at The Antioch School, each hugging her or his own child-sized harp, their faces pressed close to the strings.

  • Web site profiles life in village by and for young families

    Fiber artist, Antioch University McGregor and Nonstop Liberal Arts Institute student, and “Why Here/Why Now” Web site creator Brooke Bryan does her homework with her children, left to right, Lily, Kaden, and Vivian.

    “When the Village Council convenes in the small space at the Bryan Center, most Yellow Springs families are busy fixing dinner, attending after-school functions and extracurricular activities, and bathing and putting their youth to bed.”

  • Tidings of joy, babe born in stable van

    Exhausted but very happy after Gabriella Kibblewhite’s memorable birth are, in front, Jalana Lazar; in back, Naysan McIlhargey; Lee Kibblewhite holding daughter Lily; Molly Lunde holding her new baby; Aimee Maruyama and Miranda Lloyd.

    Last Thursday Jalana Lazar and her husband, Naysan McIlhargey, had not been home long when the phone rang. They had just spent the evening with long-time friends Molly Lunde and her husband, Lee Kibblewhite, Molly’s sister, Aimee Maruyama, and Molly’s childhood pal, Miranda Lloyd.

  • 25 days of Christmas kindness

    Villager Matt Ishihara was surprised by two secret Santas, who brought him 25 gifts to open each day until Christmas. The gifts have helped to lift his spirits during the first holiday season since the death of his wife.

    Tenderly opening the squeezably soft and lightweight tube-shaped present wrapped in snowflake paper, Matt Ishihara’s face lit up when the contents were finally revealed.

  • Couples synchronize their smooches

    Many villagers took part last Saturday in “The Kiss,” a performance art piece by local artist Nancy Mellon that was part of the Yellow Springs Holiday Festival. As conceived by Mellon, at 3:07 p.m. Saturday 80 couples — romantic, familial, or other — kissed at one of many kissing stations around town. Shown above are, from left, Ryan Berning and Emma Robinow at Current Cuisine, Moya Shea and Marianne MacQueen, Ed and Nancy Vernot at Friends Care Extended Living Center, and Leon Holster and Flo Lorenz, also at Current.

    Years from now, as they look back on the event, residents and visitors to Yellow Springs might not remember the exact date or year, but they’ll remember the time. 3:07 p.m. At least, that’s when the official kissing began.

  • Rwandans open up world for YS

    Teachers Fidele Havugimana and Tony Gasana, from left, back row; students Kelly Ngamije, Eugenia Uwamariya, front; and headmaster Brother Straton Malisaba, right, from Ecôle des Sciences secondary school in Byimana, Rwanda, are teaching and attending classes at YSHS for six weeks due to the efforts of retired Central State chemistry professor Al Schlueter.

    It was an ordinary night in the village. Traven was showing Tony — both Yellow Springs High School students — how to make Rice Crispy treats. Another student, Kelly, was doing homework alongside her brothers and sisters.

  • Marilyn’s story of wheel gratitude

    Longtime Yellow Springs resident Marilyn Van Eaton, after a long bout of illness, uses this recumbent bicycle to wheel around town and to regain her health. The bike was purchased after friends raised $1,000 from villagers so that Van Eaton could have a bike.

    “This will be a love letter to the village,” said Marilyn Van Eaton, her eyes filled with tears. The recent interview had to be stopped several times while she composed herself, describing the “long row to hoe” that has defined her life for so many years.

  • Travelers surf cultures, couches

    Kathleen Hotmer, left, and Judith Wolert-Maldonado of Yellow Springs are satisfied veterans of couch surfing, a new Internet-based way to travel by spending the night on the sofas of strangers. The women have found couch surfing inexpensive, safe and a good way to meet new people and experience different cultures.

    “I’ve been traveling since I was a baby,” said Judith Wolert-Maldonado as she sipped her tea at The Emporium. “My mom and dad came to the U.S. from Argentina in the late ’60s. I was born in ’70 and by seven months old I was flying back to Argentina with my parents.

  • Soldier’s Afghan tour prompts NPR ‘This I Believe’ essay

    Writer and Air Force reservist Todd ‘TJ’ Turner’s essay about his 2006 deployment to Afghanistan was selected to be read on NPR’s ‘This I Believe’ segment Nov. 9 in honor of Veteran’s Day.

    National Public Radio’s popular media project, “This I Believe,” has inspired thousands of writers across the country (including 10 from Yellow Springs) to express and condense their thoughts into a personal essay, 500 words or less, then submit it for consideration to NPR’s selection committee.

  • On Halloween, Gardner puts the ‘boo’ back into books

    Lucille Gardner shares a book with 7-year-old Sean Adams. She continues to share her passion for reading with children in novel ways, including inviting trick-or-treaters in for a snack and a book.

    “She may be hard of hearing but she listens to kids,” said Sue Hawkey of her friend and colleague, Lucille Gardner. “She really hears what kids have to say.” Hawkey taught fourth grade at Mills Lawn School from 2003 up until this past spring.

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