Jul
24
2016
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Articles About 365 project

  • A spotlight on local black history

    Antioch Professor of History Kevin McGruder, left, and Mills Lawn School Counselor John Gudgel, former principal of Yellow Springs High School, helped develop the new brochure, “Blacks in Yellow Springs,” highlighting the rich history of African Americans in the village. Undertaken by the 365 Project, the brochure is available at the Yellow Springs Chamber of Commerce, the Train Station and elsewhere in the village. (Photo by Dylan Taylor-Lehman)

    “If it weren’t for the role blacks have played in Yellow Springs, Yellow Springs wouldn’t be what it is today,” noted Yellow Springer John Gudgel recently.

  • Spike Lee film set to spark conversations

    “Do the Right Thing,” an acclaimed 1989 film by director Spike Lee (center in Dodgers jersey), will be shown this Saturday, Feb. 20, at 11 a.m. at the Little Art Theatre. The film, which is free and open to the public, is part of the Black History Month film series sponsored by the 365 Group and Yellow Springs Young People of Color. (Still from Do the Right Thing)

    This Saturday, villagers have an opportunity to both see the now-iconic film, “Do the Right Thing,” which mirrors today’s racial tensions, and discuss it, at a free screening at 11 a.m. at the Little Art Theatre.

  • Group addresses race issues

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    Are people of color targeted by police here? Are African-American students in school punished worse than their white counterparts? Are racial minorities discriminated against in downtown stores? Is local black history being lost?

  • “Mixed race discussion and other stuff” rescheduled

    Current and former Yellow Springs High School students spoke about racism in the local schools and how to empower local black youth at a panel discussion April 21 at AU Midwest. Panelists are, from left, Teresa Bondurant-Wagner, Cameron Henderson, Hafiz Mensah, Taylor Beck and Edward Johnson. (photos by Megan Bachman)

    The 365 Project has rescheduled its “Mixed Race Discussion and Other Stuff” for Saturday, March 21, at 1 p.m. at Mills Lawn School.

  • Forum tackles race relations

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    About 15 years ago in Knoxville, Tenn., Opolot Okia was riding his bicycle past the daycare where his son was playing with other kids in the school yard.

  • 365 Project panel— Being young and black in the village

    Current and former Yellow Springs High School students spoke about racism in the local schools and how to empower local black youth at a panel discussion April 21 at AU Midwest. Panelists are, from left, Teresa Bondurant-Wagner, Cameron Henderson, Hafiz Mensah, Taylor Beck and Edward Johnson. (photos by Megan Bachman)

    In some ways, it’s harder to be young and black in Yellow Springs today than in the 1970s.

  • Being black in Yellow Springs

    Young people who grew up in Yellow Springs during the 1960s were in a “racial, social and economic bubble” where kids had little awareness of race, class or economic level, according to Yellow Springs natives who will speak soon on the topic, “Being Black in Yellow Springs: The Sixties Experience.”

  • Village natives to speak on black experience

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    Five former and current villagers will speak on “Being Black in Yellow Springs: The Sixties Experience” on Monday, Feb. 25, at 6:30 p.m. at Antioch University MIdwest.

  • Elders recall a more diverse era

    A panel of native Yellow Springers will discuss the significant role African Americans have played in the making of Yellow Springs and other issues at a free forum on Monday, Oct. 29, from 7 to 9 p.m. at Antioch University Midwest. From left are panelists Betty Ford, Sharon Perry, David Perry, Kingsley Perry Jr., and Isabel Newman. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    The complicated history of race relations in town and the significant role African Americans have played in the making of Yellow Springs will be addressed at a forum on Monday, Oct. 29, from 7 to 9 p.m. at Antioch University Midwest.