Oct
23
2017
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Articles About 365 project

  • Council on policing— Guidelines stress anti-racism

    At Village Council’s July 3 meeting, Council members unanimously approved adopting new guidelines for policing that take a proactively inclusive and anti-racist stance.

  • Preserving vital local black history

    Local historians and 365 Project members John Gudgel and Kevin McGruder are preserving and sharing village history in their collaborative encyclopedia project, “Blacks in Yellow Springs,” as well as black history walking tours that involve local youth as guides. Pictured here, from left, are Steve McQueen, McGruder, Malaya Booth, Gudgel and Amani Wagner, all members of The 365 Project. (Submitted photo)

    John Gudgel has had family in Yellow Springs since the 1890s; Kevin McGruder came to the village via Antioch College only five years ago. Together, these two historians are trying to preserve some vital local history that is in danger of being lost.

  • Focus on racial incidents at Yellow Springs schools

    Yellow Springs school district leaders were urged to hire more people of color and provide more racial sensitivity training for school staff and students at a meeting Monday, June 26, at First Baptist Church.

  • Village Council— RJ Hawley leaves Yellow Springs police

    Four months after the New Year’s Eve Ball Drop incident that an independent investigator described as “volatile and unsafe” due to police actions, the senior officer during the incident, RJ Hawley, is leaving the police department.

  • Village Council—Interim police chief is sworn in

    At Council’s Feb. 6 meeting, Mayor David Foubert swore in Brian Carlson as the new Yellow Springs Interim Police Chief. (Submitted photo by Brian Housh)

    Interim Police Chief Brian Carlson was sworn in to his new job at Village Council’s Feb. 6 meeting, amidst statements of support from both Council and community members.

  • A spotlight on local black history

    Antioch Professor of History Kevin McGruder, left, and Mills Lawn School Counselor John Gudgel, former principal of Yellow Springs High School, helped develop the new brochure, “Blacks in Yellow Springs,” highlighting the rich history of African Americans in the village. Undertaken by the 365 Project, the brochure is available at the Yellow Springs Chamber of Commerce, the Train Station and elsewhere in the village. (Photo by Dylan Taylor-Lehman)

    “If it weren’t for the role blacks have played in Yellow Springs, Yellow Springs wouldn’t be what it is today,” noted Yellow Springer John Gudgel recently.

  • Spike Lee film set to spark conversations

    “Do the Right Thing,” an acclaimed 1989 film by director Spike Lee (center in Dodgers jersey), will be shown this Saturday, Feb. 20, at 11 a.m. at the Little Art Theatre. The film, which is free and open to the public, is part of the Black History Month film series sponsored by the 365 Group and Yellow Springs Young People of Color. (Still from Do the Right Thing)

    This Saturday, villagers have an opportunity to both see the now-iconic film, “Do the Right Thing,” which mirrors today’s racial tensions, and discuss it, at a free screening at 11 a.m. at the Little Art Theatre.

  • Group addresses race issues

    Are people of color targeted by police here? Are African-American students in school punished worse than their white counterparts? Are racial minorities discriminated against in downtown stores? Is local black history being lost?

  • “Mixed race discussion and other stuff” rescheduled

    Current and former Yellow Springs High School students spoke about racism in the local schools and how to empower local black youth at a panel discussion April 21 at AU Midwest. Panelists are, from left, Teresa Bondurant-Wagner, Cameron Henderson, Hafiz Mensah, Taylor Beck and Edward Johnson. (photos by Megan Bachman)

    The 365 Project has rescheduled its “Mixed Race Discussion and Other Stuff” for Saturday, March 21, at 1 p.m. at Mills Lawn School.

  • Forum tackles race relations

    About 15 years ago in Knoxville, Tenn., Opolot Okia was riding his bicycle past the daycare where his son was playing with other kids in the school yard.

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