Articles About Glen Helen :: Page 3

  • Art exhibit kicks off Glen 50th celebration

    Bill Hooper and Jane Baker were among the many villagers who attended the Friday night reception for the art exhibit that features artwork inspired by the Glen. They are looking at "Glen Helen Raptor" by local sculptor Jon Hudson, created from scrap metal found in the Glen. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    A well-attended exhibit of original art created by artists inspired by the Glen kicked off the Glen’s weekend celebration of its 50th anniversary on Friday evening.

  • Owl in a day’s work

    On the first day of this week’s Ecocamp schedule, the night camp crew joined Naturalist Rebecca Deatsman for a talk with Otus, the screech owl, who eyed his observers, from left, Sami Adler, Danielle Williamson, Micah Lindsey, Grace Doyle, Bailey Gallion and Zoe Caswell. This weekend the Glen Helen Association celebrates its 50th anniversary and the thousands of volunteers who have helped shape the preserve and continue to support its educational and recreational missions. (photo by Lauren Heaton)

    Copies of this and other photographs may be purchased from the Yellow Springs News; please contact us via e-mail at ysnews {at} ysnews(.)com or by phone, between 9:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m., Mon.–Fri.

  • Youth give back to their Glen Helen

    Gently holding Amos before a group of area church youth who stopped by Trailside unexpectedly on Saturday, Joe Plumer explained what Glen Helen’s box turtle likes to eat and how to bathe him in warm water. Plumer has helped pioneer a new program at the Glen utilizing youth and an adult mentor as docents for the Glen. Volunteer Deborah Dillon, holding vitamins for Amos, has worked with Plumer for two years. (photo by Lauren Heaton)

    Glen Helen volunteer Deborah Dillon didn’t much care for snakes when she started welcoming visitors at Trailside Museum five years ago. But then Joe Plumer, who was 9 at the time and passionate about amphibians, opened her eyes to the fascinating lives that snakes of all kinds lead.

  • Recession knocks local nonprofits

    Almost a full year after the national economic seizure, nonprofit organizations in the village are feeling the squeeze in their budgets. The crash affected most markedly the heftily endowed, and it hurt most cruelly the service-oriented groups. While contraction to reduce expenditures is an option, many local nonprofits are choosing to maintain or expand their programs in hopes of riding out a temporary financial slump.

  • Birds on the brain

    On a day with lots of wind, birding experts and watchers counting species for the third Make It Count for the Birds event in the Glen on Saturday, May 9, surpassed last year’s data by one. The group charted a total of 89 species of birds, including one Tennessee oven bird, a wilson, a barred owl, blue herons (immature shown, top right), and lots of magnolia warblers and Baltimore orioles everywhere. The 40 to 50 birders added several new bird species to this year’s list, including a black vulture (a piece of data that supports the northern movement that species has been making), a Canada warbler, a yellow breasted chat and a wild turkey that one birder from Illinois saw sitting on its nest. Perhaps it was the wind, or the clouds, or the fact that many migrants just decided to pass up the Glen in hopes of better weather in Canada, but Saturday was “a really tough year for finding birds out there,” according to Glen Director Nick Boutis, who added that almost every warbler and more than half the birds counted were single sightings. “In other words, if you’d looked the other direction or happened not to hear that chirp, you’d have missed it.”

    Copies of this and other photographs may be purchased from the News; please contact us via e-mail at ysnews {at} ysnews(.)com, or by phone, between 9:30 a.m. and 5: 30 p.m., Mon.–Fri. RELATED POSTS: Watching birds, helping the Glen The Glen in winter home to many birds — count on it State representatives call for […]

  • Glen Helen celebrates 80 years as a living green memorial

    Glen Helen Director Nick Boutis and 12 local birders saw and heard a phoebe, a yellow rumped warbler, a screech owl and what they guessed was a Cooper’s hawk soaring high above the trees on Sunday morning. The bird hike was a preview to the annual bird counting event, Make It Count for the Birds, to be held on Saturday, May 9, during the month the Glen will celebrate its 80th birthday.

    Morning may be considered a quiet time for humans, but for birds it’s all about chatting. Male red-winged blackbirds call to their drably dressed counterparts, downy woodpeckers impound their beaks for breakfast nibbles, and goldfinch streak through cedars in their chase as cardinals try to drown them all out with unsubtle piercing refrains.

  • Glen reaches out for support

    Trailside Museum staffers Anne Marie Long and Geno Luketic’s mission is to help visitors to know and love the Glen, as well as to protect the preserve and its vulnerable ecology. The museum’s summer hours are from 1 to 7 p.m. Monday–Thursday, 10 a.m.–8 p.m. on Friday, and 9 a.m.–8 p.m. Saturday–Sunday.

    Fear of snakes is common, but visitors who have held gentle Pepper, the black rat snake who resides at Glen Helen’s Trailside Museum, know that most local snakes are harmless.

  • Watching birds, helping the Glen

    Glen Helen Director Nick Boutis will lead a dawn chorus walk this Saturday, May 10, as part of the daylong Make It Count for the Birds event. The event is the Glen’s biggest fundraiser.

    Eleven months out of the year, Glen Helen Director Nick Boutis likes to sleep in, but in May he rolls out of bed early. That’s the month that migrating birds stop in the Glen and Glen Helen Director Nick Boutis, a bird lover, can be found in the nature preserve with his binoculars even at the crack of dawn, looking up.

  • Glen likely to be preserved

    Negotiations about the fate of Antioch College this year have raised questions about the state of the assets associated with it, including Glen Helen. Questions such as what will happen to the land and the Glen’s education programs and who will ultimately lead the organization are still unclear…

  • Native artifacts illustrate Glen Helen’s historic richness

    The completion of the Baldwin Artifact Collection of Native American projectile points and tools, such as those shown in Glen Helen Ecology Institute Director Nick Boutis’s hand, will be commemorated by two archaeologists speaking at the Glen Building on Wednesday and Thursday, March 12–13, at 7:30 p.m.

    The unveiling of a collection of ancient Native American points and tools donated to Glen Helen 20 years ago may not play like a riveting drama. But talk to natural historian Geoffrey Sea, and he might convince you of quite the opposite.

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