Jul
07
2015
Chance of a Thunderstorm
Tuesday
High 82° / Low 64°
Rain
Wednesday
High 71° / Low 64°

Articles About Glen Helen :: Page 3

  • The Glen in winter home to many birds — count on it

    The red bellied nuthatch is a hardy bird that winters in Ohio.

    Join the Glen’s efforts next weekend to count the birds of Yellow Springs.

  • Glen may become conservancy

    If a new collaboration is successful the Glen Helen Nature Preserve may be permanently protected from development in a few years. At a meeting last week, Gariot Louima of Antioch College, Nick Boutis of the Glen Helen Ecology Institute, Krista Magaw of the Tecumseh Land Trust and Bill Carroll of the Trust for Public Land, gathered in the Glen. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    The Glen Helen Nature Preserve has been saved from development several times in its 82-year history.

  • A closer look at the Glen

    Nine of Glen Helen’s seasoned naturalists will lead a series of hands-on, family-friendly programs for Earth Day, Saturday, April 23, including a Tiny Things workshop led by naturalist Kathleen Soler, with Hannah Brewster at left. Events take place at the Outdoor Education Center and Raptor Center beginning at 8 a.m. with a youth and family fun run, followed by programs on fossils, backyard birds and Ohio wildlife. Events run until 2 p.m. (Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    The nine naturalists who came last August to live in Glen Helen and lead the preserve’s educational programs throughout the year have grown fond of their home in the woods.

  • Celebrate Earth Day

    baby earth

    Earth Day 2011 will be celebrated in Yellow Springs with several events this week.

  • Glen Helen fundraiser dinner—Finally, a use for honeysuckle

    Villager Dennis Moore is shown with the three chairs he constructed from honeysuckle that was pulled from the Glen. The chairs will be auctioned this Saturday, July 17, at the “Whoo Cooks for You?” fundraiser event at Glen Helen. While the dinner tickets are expected to be sold out, preregistered callers may bid on the chairs. Register to bid by calling 769-1902 or online at www.whoocooksforyou.org.

    When the barred owl sings its inquisitive call “whoo cooks for you?” this weekend, the folks at Glen Helen will have an answer. At a long dinner table at the Raptor Center on Sunday, July 18, area diners in support of the Glen will sit down to enjoy a meal whose origins are both known and local with the area chefs and farmers who grew and prepared the food.

  • Art exhibit kicks off Glen 50th celebration

    Bill Hooper and Jane Baker were among the many villagers who attended the Friday night reception for the art exhibit that features artwork inspired by the Glen. They are looking at "Glen Helen Raptor" by local sculptor Jon Hudson, created from scrap metal found in the Glen. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    A well-attended exhibit of original art created by artists inspired by the Glen kicked off the Glen’s weekend celebration of its 50th anniversary on Friday evening.

  • Owl in a day’s work

    On the first day of this week’s Ecocamp schedule, the night camp crew joined Naturalist Rebecca Deatsman for a talk with Otus, the screech owl, who eyed his observers, from left, Sami Adler, Danielle Williamson, Micah Lindsey, Grace Doyle, Bailey Gallion and Zoe Caswell. This weekend the Glen Helen Association celebrates its 50th anniversary and the thousands of volunteers who have helped shape the preserve and continue to support its educational and recreational missions. (photo by Lauren Heaton)

    Copies of this and other photographs may be purchased from the Yellow Springs News; please contact us via e-mail at [email protected] or by phone, between 9:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m., Mon.–Fri.

  • Youth give back to their Glen Helen

    Gently holding Amos before a group of area church youth who stopped by Trailside unexpectedly on Saturday, Joe Plumer explained what Glen Helen’s box turtle likes to eat and how to bathe him in warm water. Plumer has helped pioneer a new program at the Glen utilizing youth and an adult mentor as docents for the Glen. Volunteer Deborah Dillon, holding vitamins for Amos, has worked with Plumer for two years. (photo by Lauren Heaton)

    Glen Helen volunteer Deborah Dillon didn’t much care for snakes when she started welcoming visitors at Trailside Museum five years ago. But then Joe Plumer, who was 9 at the time and passionate about amphibians, opened her eyes to the fascinating lives that snakes of all kinds lead.

  • Recession knocks local nonprofits

    Almost a full year after the national economic seizure, nonprofit organizations in the village are feeling the squeeze in their budgets. The crash affected most markedly the heftily endowed, and it hurt most cruelly the service-oriented groups. While contraction to reduce expenditures is an option, many local nonprofits are choosing to maintain or expand their programs in hopes of riding out a temporary financial slump.

  • Birds on the brain

    On a day with lots of wind, birding experts and watchers counting species for the third Make It Count for the Birds event in the Glen on Saturday, May 9, surpassed last year’s data by one. The group charted a total of 89 species of birds, including one Tennessee oven bird, a wilson, a barred owl, blue herons (immature shown, top right), and lots of magnolia warblers and Baltimore orioles everywhere. The 40 to 50 birders added several new bird species to this year’s list, including a black vulture (a piece of data that supports the northern movement that species has been making), a Canada warbler, a yellow breasted chat and a wild turkey that one birder from Illinois saw sitting on its nest. Perhaps it was the wind, or the clouds, or the fact that many migrants just decided to pass up the Glen in hopes of better weather in Canada, but Saturday was “a really tough year for finding birds out there,” according to Glen Director Nick Boutis, who added that almost every warbler and more than half the birds counted were single sightings. “In other words, if you’d looked the other direction or happened not to hear that chirp, you’d have missed it.”

    Copies of this and other photographs may be purchased from the News; please contact us via e-mail at [email protected], or by phone, between 9:30 a.m. and 5: 30 p.m., Mon.–Fri.