Aug
20
2017
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Articles About Wright State University

  • Reflections on the final note

    Wright State Universtiy psychology professor and Yellow Springs resident Cheryl Meyer sat with the collection of suicide notes that formed the backbone of a recent study of suicide. With three colleagues, she published the results of her research in a book called “Explaining Suicide.” The unusually large collection of notes provided data that allowed researchers to pursue aspects of the phenomenon that hadn’t yet been studied. (Photo by Dylan Taylor-Lehman)

    While suicide notes only exist because of the most sorrowful of circumstances, the epistles nonetheless provide significant insight into the psychology of committing the final act, and therefore what might be able to be done to prevent it.

  • Board approves sale— WSU land sale may advance fire station plans

    The Wright State University Board of Trustees voted last Friday to approve the potential sale to a qualified buyer of about four acres of land in Yellow Springs, the former site of the medical clinic on Xenia Avenue between Marshall and Herman streets.

  • Yellow Springs middle and high school student drug use assessed

    On Monday, Yellow Springs students filled out the latest version of the Dayton Area Drug Survey, a bi-annual survey designed to collect data on the substance use habits of area students.

  • Scientist finds new ash borer host

    Wright State University Biology Professor Dr. Don Cipollini pointed out his groundbreaking discovery that the white fringe tree can be a host for the emerald ash borer. Cipollini was the first to publish research and convince the U.S. EPA to confirm the white fringe tree as the only other known host for the invasive beetle. Trees planted along the bike path and elsewhere in the village were instrumental to his discovery. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    A local white fringe tree planted along the bike path is now famous as the second documented host of an invasive beetle that was thought to only prey upon ash trees.

  • Wasp named for ‘lord of the flies’

    Entomologist John Stireman, who lives in the village and works at Wright State University, was honored in November by having a newly-identified wasp, the Ilatha Stiremani, named after him. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    In the 1979 science fiction horror film Alien, a parasitic extraterrestrial bursts out of an astronaut’s chest, killing him, in the film’s iconic scene. The lifecycle of parasitic insects is not much different, according to Wright State entomologist and Yellow Springs resident John Stireman.

  • Fate of old clinic site still not known

    Since the Yellow Springs Family Health Center, operated by Wright State University Physicians, was abandoned and demolished three years ago, the land has been vacant.

  • Wright State professor Opolot Okia— Reexaming slavery

    Wright State professor Opolot Okia (Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    In certain eras, it has perhaps been easier to say that slavery and forced labor are wrong than to live that principle.

  • No return for clinic; possible fire station site

    the Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine no longer plans to rebuild the school’s health clinic that was located in Yellow Springs; however, the Miami Township Fire-Rescue department hopes to provide a new community use for the site.

  • Wright State clinic won’t return

    Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine leaders recently stated that the former Wright State family health clinic located in Yellow Springs will not return to the village due to a lack of fund-raising success.

  • Window on clinic closing

    It has been over a year since the Yellow Springs Family Health Center operated by Wright State University Physicians left Yellow Springs; the clinic has not been able to secure the funds needed to rebuild a medical center.

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