May
24
2016
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Articles About WYSO

  • A new voice on the air at WYSO

    April Laissle, 23, is WYSO’s new morning on-air host and news reporter, filling the vacancy left by Ariel Van Cleave. She came to the station from WOUB Public Media in Athens, after graduating from Ohio University in 2015. She called her new position at WYSO her “dream job.” (Photo by Carol Simmons)

    “This was my dream job,” April Laissle said of becoming a news reporter and morning on-air host at WYSO radio in January.

  • Zombies come alive at WYSO

    Photo by Dylan Taylor-Lehman Corrie Van Ausdal, Tom Amrhein, and Sam Butler recorded sounds, or foley, at WYSO for the podcast “Zombie High School.” The podcast features all local talent and chronicles the adventures of high school students stuck in detention when the zombie apocalypse happens. “Zombie High School” enters the land of the living in mid-April. (Photo by Dylan Taylor-Lehman)

    From the sound of it, the zombies in the recording booth were as gruesome as they come.

  • Tecumseh Land Trust’s language of the land

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    The Tecumseh Land Trust and WYSO–FM essay contest “Home on Earth: Living on the Land” will award winners for personal nonfiction essays on what home and land mean to them.

  • Blue Moon Soup at Clifton— A musical melange of bluegrass, Celtic and ’60s rock riffs

    Local four-piece string band Blue Moon Soup is making a name for itself in the region with a sound that blends bluegrass, Celtic traditional, folk and pop. From left is Jon Bauman, Robbie Marion, Brendan Moore, Justin Moon and pitbull “Moon.” Blue Moon Soup plays a benefit concert for WYSO at the Clifton Opera House at 7 p.m. Friday, May 16, with Irish duo Changeling. (Submitted photo by Suzy Perler)

    If the wizard Gandalf was a fan of the Grateful Dead, he would probably also listen to the Blue Moon Soup string band.

  • Antioch College’s Miller Fellows boost local nonprofits

    Antioch College students Kelsey Pierson, left, and Khalil Nasar, far right, chopped wood with Glen Helen Nature Preserve Land Manager George Bieri, center, on a recent chilly afternoon in the Glen. Pierson and Nasar are two of 16 Antioch students working this year at local nonprofits as Miller Fellows. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    The early careers of two Antioch College students were launched by their Miller Fellowships, during which they worked at local nonprofit organizations. In the program’s third year, 16 Antioch students are working 10 hours per week at one of 11 nonprofits.

  • WYSO brings family to town

    The first thing Toylyn, Basim and Malcolm Blunt did when they moved into their house on North Stafford Street was light incense and candles as a way to prepare the space and bring positive energy to their new home.

  • Photos from the WYSO open house

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    Local public radio station WYSO opened its studios to the public on Sunday for tours and other activities. See more photos.

  • StoryCorps creator at Schuster for WYSO fundraiser

    On Friday, June 21, WYSO will host David Isay, the founder of StoryCorps, at the Mathile Theater in the Schuster Center. His presentation, “The History of StoryCorps and the Power of Listening,” will serve as a fundraiser for WYSO.

  • WYSO’s ReInvention Stories— Dayton resilience, on air and web

    ReInvention Stories, a collaboration between WYSO public radio and local filmmakers Julia Reichert and Steve Bognar, uses video, radio and interactive online media to explore how Dayton is re-charging itself after years of economic collapse.

  • Transfer ‘celebratory’ for college

    The recent agreement between Antioch College and Antioch University that nullifies the university’s remaining claims to the college campus will allow the college to move ahead with projects that also benefit the Yellow Springs community.

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