Dec
16
2017
Clear
Saturday
High 48° / Low 31°
Chance of Rain
Sunday
High 40° / Low 36°

Articles About Yellow Springs Chamber of Commerce

  • Restorative justice and Yellow Springs a good fit

    Villagers Jennifer Berman and Jalyn Roe are the organizing forces behind a national conference on restorative justice, “Healing Harms in Today’s Troubled World,” to be held Oct. 27–29 at Antioch College. The event aims to teach participants about the principles and practices of restorative justice. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    “Healing Harms in Today’s Troubled World,” the first Annual Community and Restorative Justice Symposium, will be held in the village, from Oct. 27 to 29.

  • Out (and about) on the street

    Attendees of the 2017 Spring Street Fair seemed to be having a good time, including this bubble-blower on Dayton Street. (Photo by Aaron Zaremsky)

    Some villagers have reported that Saturday’s Spring Street Fair 2017 was the best ever.

  • Yellow Springs Hardware, a new old store

    Yellow Springs has had the same hardware more than 90 years, yet it has changed hands only three times. Kathy Macklemore, left, who has managed the store for 16 years, is pictured here with the new owners of Yellow Springs Hardware, Shep Anderson and Gilah Pomeranz. The couple took over at the beginning of January, though Macklemore will stay on as manager. (Photo by Matt Minde)

    There has been a hardware store in Yellow Springs for more than 90 years, and throughout that time, it has changed hands only three times.

  • Neigh sayers

    “Yellow Friday,” Yellow Springs’ alternative to Black Friday, had a festive air thanks to sidewalk music, longer shop hours and free horse-drawn cart rides.

  • Pop culture

    Justin and Jennifer Stafford of Oakwood, kneeling and at right, and their daughter, Harper, left bottom corner, were among the bubble-lovers who visited Yellow Springs on Sunday to take part in the annual Bubblefest. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    Yellow Springs annual Bubblefest was held on Sunday, Sept. 3. The event brought hundreds of visitors for hours of soapy diversion.

  • Living, learning in the real world

    Alexandra Scott, known in Yellow Springs as Alex, posed outside the Spirited Goat on a recent afternoon. The Dayton Street coffeehouse is one of her favorite village haunts. A poet, activist and events coordinator extraordinaire, Scott moved here in 2012 and has gradually made the village her home. (Photo by audrey Hackett)

    Meet Alexandra Scott: event planner, poet, activist, coffeehouse lover, future entrepreneur, villager.

  • Sift through OATS for some eclectic home décor

    Sam Jacobs and shop owner, Abbey Knight stand in front the newest store downtown, OATS, Ohio Antique Trading Supply. (Photo by Carol Simmons)

    The newest store on the downtown Xenia Avenue strip brings an eclectic mix of mostly home décor items that combine a sense of old and new.

  • Merry marchers, friendly fire on the Fourth

    Richard Zopf whipped up patriotic fervor for the Odd Fellows, who organized 4th of July parade and fireworks. (PHhoto by Diane Chiddsiter)

    Villagers and visitors didn’t let gloomy skies and the occasional raindrop thwart their Fourth of July on Monday.

  • A spotlight on local black history

    Antioch Professor of History Kevin McGruder, left, and Mills Lawn School Counselor John Gudgel, former principal of Yellow Springs High School, helped develop the new brochure, “Blacks in Yellow Springs,” highlighting the rich history of African Americans in the village. Undertaken by the 365 Project, the brochure is available at the Yellow Springs Chamber of Commerce, the Train Station and elsewhere in the village. (Photo by Dylan Taylor-Lehman)

    “If it weren’t for the role blacks have played in Yellow Springs, Yellow Springs wouldn’t be what it is today,” noted Yellow Springer John Gudgel recently.

  • Yellow Springs Street Fair: Blue notes, blue skies

    Musician Tumust Allison from Dayton played a powerful sax during last Saturday’s Street Fair. (Photo by Aaron Zaremsky)

    Temperatures on Saturday hit 93 degrees, but the music was even hotter than the weather.