Nov
24
2017
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Articles About African-American culture and history

  • Virginia in Ohio

    Standing with Virginia Hamilton's Ohio Historical marker is Hamilton’s husband, Arnold Adoff; her son, Jaime Adoff; and granddaughter, Anaya Adoff. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    A crowd of local students and community members converged on the Yellow Springs library last Wednesday, March 22, for the dedication of a historical marker for renowned author Virginia Hamilton, who grew up and lived most of her life in Yellow Springs.

  • Story in stitches

    Pictured above is quilt maker Maxine Thomas, left, with Faith Patterson's daughter, Karen Patterson. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    A special quilt in honor of Faith Patterson was unveiled at the Yellow Springs library on Feb. 22.

  • Stories of amazing African Americans

    Bishop Daniel Payne, founder of Wilberforce University, pictured here in a historical rendering, is among the notable African Americans featured in a local history talk at the YS Community Library on Feb. 23. (Photo via Library of Congress)

    Learn about notable African Americans from the Miami Valley in a local history talk at the YS Community Library this Tuesday, Feb. 23, 6–7:30 p.m. Presented by the National Afro-American Museum in Wilberforce.

  • Busting out

    Sculptor Brian Maughan watched as Gallery Coordinator Nancy Mellon unveiled his new work, a bust of Gaunt. The sculpture was added to the YS Arts Council’s permanent collection. (Submitted photo)

    The YS Arts Council and the YS Historical Society presented “Beyond Flour and Sugar: The Wheeling Gaunt Legacy and Yellow Springs In the Civil War Era” on Friday, Jan. 20, at Antioch University Midwest.

  • Building an historic collection at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture

    Smithsonian Institution. Tuliza Fleming, a YS High School graduate, is the curator of art for the Smithsonian’s recently opened National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C. Named to the position in 2007, she was tasked with creating the then yet-to-be-built museum’s permanent art collection. She’s shown here in 2014. (Submitted photo by Michael R. Barnes)

    The opening of the Smithsonian’s new National Museum of African American History and Culture on the National Mall in September followed more than a century of efforts to recognize formally in our nation’s Capital the contributions of black Americans in the making, building, growth and life of this country.

  • A spotlight on local black history

    Antioch Professor of History Kevin McGruder, left, and Mills Lawn School Counselor John Gudgel, former principal of Yellow Springs High School, helped develop the new brochure, “Blacks in Yellow Springs,” highlighting the rich history of African Americans in the village. Undertaken by the 365 Project, the brochure is available at the Yellow Springs Chamber of Commerce, the Train Station and elsewhere in the village. (Photo by Dylan Taylor-Lehman)

    “If it weren’t for the role blacks have played in Yellow Springs, Yellow Springs wouldn’t be what it is today,” noted Yellow Springer John Gudgel recently.

  • Grandson’s heart-breaking question inspires a new book

    Villager Julia Davis, former Yelliow Springs High School history teacher, recently published her new book, “I Like My Brown Skin Because... Celebrating the Heritage of African American Children.” (Photo by Carol Simmons)

    What began as a letter written to her 4-year-old grandson while he napped has become a 142-page, 12-chapter, hard-cover book earning praise from prestigious review boards and lay readers alike for its author, villager Julia Davis.

  • Spike Lee film set to spark conversations

    “Do the Right Thing,” an acclaimed 1989 film by director Spike Lee (center in Dodgers jersey), will be shown this Saturday, Feb. 20, at 11 a.m. at the Little Art Theatre. The film, which is free and open to the public, is part of the Black History Month film series sponsored by the 365 Group and Yellow Springs Young People of Color. (Still from Do the Right Thing)

    This Saturday, villagers have an opportunity to both see the now-iconic film, “Do the Right Thing,” which mirrors today’s racial tensions, and discuss it, at a free screening at 11 a.m. at the Little Art Theatre.

  • Antioch College historian eyes race, community

    Kevin McGruder, assistant professor of history at Antioch College, will discuss his latest book, Race and Real Estate: Conflict and Cooperation in Harlem 1890–1920, on Tuesday, Aug. 4. at 7 p.m. at McGregor 113 on the college campus. He will also sign copies of this book, which was recently published by Columbia University Press. (Photo By diane chiddister)

    But Kevin McGruder, assistant professor of history at Antioch College, tells the story of early white Harlem residents who appeared to hold diverse views of their African-American neighbors. And he believes that Harlem was originally a place of aspiration for the blacks who moved there.

  • 365 Project panel— Being young and black in the village

    Current and former Yellow Springs High School students spoke about racism in the local schools and how to empower local black youth at a panel discussion April 21 at AU Midwest. Panelists are, from left, Teresa Bondurant-Wagner, Cameron Henderson, Hafiz Mensah, Taylor Beck and Edward Johnson. (photos by Megan Bachman)

    In some ways, it’s harder to be young and black in Yellow Springs today than in the 1970s.

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