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2016
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Articles About African-American culture and history

  • Grandson’s heart-breaking question inspires a new book

    Villager Julia Davis, former Yelliow Springs High School history teacher, recently published her new book, “I Like My Brown Skin Because... Celebrating the Heritage of African American Children.” (Photo by Carol Simmons)

    What began as a letter written to her 4-year-old grandson while he napped has become a 142-page, 12-chapter, hard-cover book earning praise from prestigious review boards and lay readers alike for its author, villager Julia Davis.

  • Spike Lee film set to spark conversations

    “Do the Right Thing,” an acclaimed 1989 film by director Spike Lee (center in Dodgers jersey), will be shown this Saturday, Feb. 20, at 11 a.m. at the Little Art Theatre. The film, which is free and open to the public, is part of the Black History Month film series sponsored by the 365 Group and Yellow Springs Young People of Color. (Still from Do the Right Thing)

    This Saturday, villagers have an opportunity to both see the now-iconic film, “Do the Right Thing,” which mirrors today’s racial tensions, and discuss it, at a free screening at 11 a.m. at the Little Art Theatre.

  • Antioch College historian eyes race, community

    Kevin McGruder, assistant professor of history at Antioch College, will discuss his latest book, Race and Real Estate: Conflict and Cooperation in Harlem 1890–1920, on Tuesday, Aug. 4. at 7 p.m. at McGregor 113 on the college campus. He will also sign copies of this book, which was recently published by Columbia University Press. (Photo By diane chiddister)

    But Kevin McGruder, assistant professor of history at Antioch College, tells the story of early white Harlem residents who appeared to hold diverse views of their African-American neighbors. And he believes that Harlem was originally a place of aspiration for the blacks who moved there.

  • 365 Project panel— Being young and black in the village

    Current and former Yellow Springs High School students spoke about racism in the local schools and how to empower local black youth at a panel discussion April 21 at AU Midwest. Panelists are, from left, Teresa Bondurant-Wagner, Cameron Henderson, Hafiz Mensah, Taylor Beck and Edward Johnson. (photos by Megan Bachman)

    In some ways, it’s harder to be young and black in Yellow Springs today than in the 1970s.

  • A lesson in black and white

    The program celebrating Black History Month was performed during the day for the K–6 student body and included a dialogue with Rosa Parks, songs by Civil Rights-era folk singer Pete Seeger, and Mills Lawn students, from left, Eliza Gilchrist, Eva Schell and Malaya Booth singing with the rest of their class. (Photos by Lauren Heaton)

    Last Friday the Mills Lawn fourth, fifth and sixth grade students performed a varied program of songs, readings, poems and a skit to celebrate the end of Black History Month.

  • Wright State professor Opolot Okia— Reexaming slavery

    Wright State professor Opolot Okia (Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    In certain eras, it has perhaps been easier to say that slavery and forced labor are wrong than to live that principle.

  • Let freedom ring

    The reverend himself joins the citizens of Yellow Springs during the MLK Day march (photo by Aaron Zaremsky)

    The streets of Yellow Springs echoed with the sounds of the civil rights movement Monday morning. Admirers of Martin Luther King Jr. chanted “We Shall Overcome” as they marched through the streets; a jovial tribute to one of the most iconic and important figures in American history. Upon the crowd’s arrival at the Central Chapel […]

  • I’ve got the Blues

    Photo by Aaron Zaremsky

    The AACW Blues Fest went off without a hitch last weekend at the Antioch Amphitheater.

  • Juneteenth a Scrumptious Affair

    Juneteenth pies lined up for the judges during the Juneteenth celebration

    Juneteenth celebrations included a pie contest and Motown dancing last Friday night at the Bryan Center.

  • TLT, AACW join for roots fest

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    Every year the local blues fest reminds community members about the roots of contemporary popular music. If gospel can spawn the blues, jazz, reggae and rap, then what can the art of the local community tell us about our own history and roots? African American Cross-Cultural Works and the Tecumseh Land Trust aim to find out when they put on the first ever Roots Fest on Saturday, March 27, at Bryan Community Center. It will be an evening of performances in which villagers use the arts to connect to and share their own stories.

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