Articles About anniversary celebration

  • Yellow Springs Art on the Lawn celebrates 30 years

    West Freeman browsed the handcrafted pottery of Dick Overman of Cincinnati with his mother, Barbara, at last year’s Art on the Lawn. This year’s art fair, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 10, is Village Artisan’s 30th annual. (Photo by Suzanne Szempruch)

    The first Village Artisans invitational art show 30 years ago wasn’t on a lawn, but in a yard — King’s Yard to be exact. “Art in the Yard” featured the work of about eight local artists, along with some folk music, and was more exhibition than art sale.

  • Methodists celebrate 175 years

    The United Methodist Church at its Winter Street location, as seen from Dayton Street in the early 20th century. The photo was developed from a glass negative owned by Howard Kahoe.

    It was the year Martin Van Buren became the eighth president of the United States. Two months after his inauguration, New York City’s major banks failed, igniting the “Panic of 1837.” And in that same year, right here in Yellow Springs, the United Methodist Church held its first meetings.

  • Antioch School 90th anniversary— A school that runs like a family

    Students were ecstatic to be out on the golf course side of the the new Antioch School around when it was built in 1953. The school will celebrate its 90th anniversary with an open house reunion on Saturday, July 7, noon–4 p.m. at the school. (Photo courtesy of Antiochiana, Antioch College)

    Elsie Hevelin remembers clearly the tall front pillars and marble fireplaces in each room of Judge Mills house where she attended the Antioch School as a child.

  • Honoring AME’s rich local history

    The Central Chapel AME Church is celebrating its 145th anniversary next weekend, Sept. 17–19, with a Friday evening banquet, Saturday afternoon picnic and two worship services on Sunday. Members of the organizing committee, from left, Carolyn Walker-Kimbro, Nan Harshaw and Denise Lennon, met last week at the chapel on High Street to finalize the festivities. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    In 1886, as the area’s educational opportunities continued to attract African Americans 23 years after the Emancipation Proclamation, 13 families from Yellow Springs and Miami Township formed a local chapter of the African Methodist Episcopal Church.

  • Presbyterians celebrate 150th

    The Yellow Springs Presbyterian Church will celebrate its 150-year birthday on Friday, Sept. 3, from 7 to 9 p.m. on the church’s front lawn downtown. Church members, including above, from left, Jeanna Breza, Barbara Boettcher, Ruth Bent and Lloyd Kennedy, invite the public to attend the party for free cake, ice cream and lemonade.

    In 1855 the First Presbyterian Church was founded in Yellow Springs when Nancy Love, tired of going by horseback in bad weather to churches in Clifton and other nearby towns, successfully convinced her husband Robert to start, with other locals, a Presbyterian church here in town. Five years later, the members, for $5,000, built the church that still stands on Xenia Avenue today.

  • Art exhibit kicks off Glen 50th celebration

    Bill Hooper and Jane Baker were among the many villagers who attended the Friday night reception for the art exhibit that features artwork inspired by the Glen. They are looking at "Glen Helen Raptor" by local sculptor Jon Hudson, created from scrap metal found in the Glen. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    A well-attended exhibit of original art created by artists inspired by the Glen kicked off the Glen’s weekend celebration of its 50th anniversary on Friday evening.

  • Gala for downtown’s ‘heart’

    A group of Little Art Theatre supporters organized the theater’s first fundraiser, an auction gala, “Clooney at the Movies.” While the event is sold out, villagers can still buy raffle tickets to get a year’s worth of free movies. In the top row are Jenny Cowperthwaite-Ruka and Kipra Heerman, and in the bottom row, from left, are Dorothy O. Scott, Diane Foubert, John Geri, Alice Earl Jenkins, Maureen Lynch and Jane Scott. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    The Little Art Theatre, which recently turned non-profit, now asks for the community’s support with its first fundraising event, an auction gala on Friday, June 25, at 5:30 p.m. at Antioch University McGregor, which also commemorates the theater’s 80-year anniversary.

  • 45 years for soccer league

    Yellow Springs Soccer Inc., YSSI, will celebrate 45 years of recreational soccer and honor Joe Robinson, the founder of the YS Recreational Soccer League, with a community potluck on Saturday, Nov. 7, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Mills Lawn School auditorium. Interested individuals and families are encouraged to keep this date available and […]

  • The Riding Centre celebrates 50 years—Louise Soelberg’s legacy trots on

    At the edge of the Glen next to a recently refurbished barn, the 8- to 10-year-olds tack up their horses. They stand on their toes to brush the horses’ backs, stoop to clean their hooves and then wind up to hoist their bulky saddles up and over in hopes that they’re centered enough to ride. Too small to mount from the ground, the young riders climb on from a set of steps in the outdoor ring and wait for Carolyn to check their stirrups. They sit high up in the air on Whisper, Honeypepper, Salty and Chipper, animals 20 times their size, which they are learning to lead and care for.

    For 50 years the Riding Centre in Yellow Springs has operated for this purpose, to teach people how to be with horses.

  • A decade of service—Home, Inc. builds diversity, stability

    Yellow Springs native Tawn Jackson Singh moved into her first home in Yellow Springs with her husband Jai Singh in November 2008, thanks to support from Home, Inc. Tawn is a new member of the Home, Inc. board, which marks its 10th anniversary this year.

    In terms of social memory, Yellow Springs has much to draw from recent history, including the coming together for Antioch College’s revival, the public effort to save Whitehall Farm, and the effort to prevent sprawl from developing on the west edge of town. A social memory of common experiences and struggles creates the kind of community that can weather political storms, according to local resident Don Hollister, and that is the kind of community he wants to support.

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