Apr
21
2015
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Articles About documentary

  • Film argues that education is a right

    Antioch College student Taylor Spratt and the Yellow Springs Bahá’í community will host a documentary highlighting an online campaign to educate Bahá’ís worldwide. The film, “To Light a Candle,” will screen this Saturday, Feb. 28 at 7 p.m. at room 219 in the Science Building on campus. Roy Qualls, right, will moderate the post-film discussion. (Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    For Taylor Spratt, an Antioch College student who grew up between Milwaukee and the Chicago suburbs, a college education was a given. But for her contemporaries who live in Iran and adhere to the Bahá’í Faith, attending Iranian university is prohibited by law.

  • Film eyes microbiome at birth

    The Little Art Theatre kicks off a week of special film events this weekend. On Sunday, Jan. 11, a free screening of “Microbirth” will take place at 1 p.m. At 7 p.m. that evening, “Nanook of the North” will launch a four-part documentary series, with Antioch College media arts professor Charles Fairbanks introducing the film and leading a discussion afterwards. On Thursday, Jan. 15, at 7:30 p.m. the New River Ensemble, comprised of Lisa Liske-Doorandish, Brendan Cooney and village native Martha Hyde will perform Cooney’s original score to classic silent films. (Submitted photos)

    The moment of birth is a joyful miracle — a time when the loving bond between parent and child is first formed. But something else is formed in that moment that could be the key to the child’s lifelong health, according to an award-winning 2014 documentary.

  • Little Art, big schedule: ‘Nanook’ leads documentaries

    The Little Art Theatre kicks off a week of special film events this weekend. On Sunday, Jan. 11, a free screening of “Microbirth” will take place at 1 p.m. At 7 p.m. that evening, “Nanook of the North” will launch a four-part documentary series, with Antioch College media arts professor Charles Fairbanks introducing the film and leading a discussion afterwards. On Thursday, Jan. 15, at 7:30 p.m. the New River Ensemble, comprised of Lisa Liske-Doorandish, Brendan Cooney and village native Martha Hyde will perform Cooney’s original score to classic silent films. (Submitted photos)

    It’s cold. It’s dark. It’s the dead of winter. What to do? You still have to get out of the house once in a while. You still have to have some fun.

  • College, community salutes MLK

    A special screening of the rarely-seen 1970 documentary film, “King: A Filmed Record: Montgomery to Memphis” will be at 1 p.m. on Sunday, Jan. 19, at the Little Art Theatre as part of two days of activities commemorating Martin Luther King Jr. Day. The film’s producer and director, Richard Kaplan, an Antioch alumnus, will lead a discussion following the screening. (Submitted photo courtesy of Kino Lorber)

    If you missed the special one-night screening on March 20, 1970, of the epic film “King: A Filmed Record … From Montgomery to Memphis,” in one of the 600 theaters across the country that showed it, then you probably haven’t seen it since.

  • Opening minds for inclusive town

    A group of villagers are offering a series of events this Saturday, Dec. 7, to highlight the perspectives of people with disabilities. A documentary, Shooting Beauty, will be shown at the Little Art at 2 and 4:30 p.m., with a panel discussion on the topic of inclusion at 3:30 p.m. at the theater. A potluck dinner at the First Presbyterian Church will follow at 6 p.m. The above couple, Cathy and Dana Culkin, are two of the film’s subjects. (Submitted photo by Courtney Bent)

    When Debra Williamson and her 15-year-old son, Alex, recently put up flyers in downtown stores for an upcoming event, she was pleased that several people, saying hello, called out to Alex by name.

  • WYSO’s ReInvention Stories— Dayton resilience, on air and web

    ReInvention Stories, a collaboration between WYSO public radio and local filmmakers Julia Reichert and Steve Bognar, uses video, radio and interactive online media to explore how Dayton is re-charging itself after years of economic collapse.

  • Film ‘Escape Fire’ seeks healthcare transformation

    Antioch University Midwest is sponsoring a free documentary, ‘Escape Fire: The Fight to Rescue American Healthcare,’ at the school on Wednesday, Feb. 27 at 6 p.m., with refreshments at 5:30 p.m. Shown above is Kent De Spain, the new chair of the school’s program for healthcare consumer advocacy/patient navigation. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    The American health care system is so broken that fixing it requires a major conceptual transformation.

  • New filmmakers show their work

    “Women Who Yell” to be shown on Thursday, June 7, at 7:30 p.m. at the Neon Movies in Dayton, as part of the Big Lens Film Festival, an annual event showcasing the creations of Wright State film students. The film was created by Megan Hague and Kyle Wilkinson, students in the production class of villagers Jim Klein and Julia Reichert. (Submitted photo)

    In Women Who Yell, 20-some 20-something women lose their cool and reveal profound, sometimes hilarious, moments of exasperation normally reserved for best friends, moms or maybe therapists.

  • Canadian David Suzuki speaks after film— Environmental icon comes to YS

    Canadian environmentalist Dr. David Suzuki will speak at the Little Art Theatre in Yellow Springs following the screening of his autobiographical film, Force of Nature, at 7 p.m. on Sunday, April 15. (Submitted photo)

    If you had one last lecture to give, what would you say? In the film Force of Nature, Dr. David Suzuki, known as the godfather of the environmental movement in Canada, delivers a legacy lecture indicting humanity for undermining the planet’s life support systems.

  • Film tracks exotic pet industry

    Exotic pet owner Terry Brumfield sat with his pet lions at home in Piketon, Ohio, in a scene captured by Springboro filmmaker Mike Webber for his award-winning documentary The Elephant in the Living Room. The filmmaker will introduce the film at the first showing of a run of sneak previews from Friday, Oct. 8–Thursday, Oct. 14, at the Little Art Theatre. (submitted photo)

    Throughout the 1980s on the east side of Hilltop Road at Fairground Road there stood a modest, old house with a conspicuously large metal cage in the back yard. On nice days, passersby who happened to focus beyond the fencing would likely have seen what appeared to be a lion. Was it a pet? Did it live there permanently? Could it escape?

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