May
26
2017
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Friday
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Articles About environmental activism

  • Activists react to pipeline news

    Last Friday, the Army Corps of Engineers made a decision to halt the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, which gave hope to0 the people demonstrating against the pipeline’s construction. While good news, anti-DAPL activists aren’t celebrating quite yet.

  • Moms Out Front for a livable climate

    Lauren Craig, left, and Laura Skidmore are two members of the Yellow Springs organizing team of Mothers Out Front, a national grassroots nonprofit seeking a “livable climate” for future generations. Meetings of the local team, started by Skidmore this spring, have drawn about 13 area women. All mothers, grandmothers and women with children in their lives are invited to join with the local group’s advocacy of renewable energy and other climate-friendly solutions. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    Mothers Out Front, a national grassroots group whose Yellow Springs team was started last spring by Laura Skidmore, seeks a “swift and complete transition to clean energy” in order to reduce the effects of climate change on future generations.

  • Bee-friendly land management— Antioch College bans ‘neonics’

    The lawn in front of Antioch Hall, known as the horseshoe, is covered with clover this time of year. In years past, that meant bees — hundreds of them — buzzing underfoot. But now the clover field is silent.

  • Faith in change on climate

    As a member of the National Religious Partnership for the Environment, Marionist Sister Leanne Jablonski hopes to unite faith groups in environmental awareness and responsibility.

  • Tour straw bale, passive house with Green Drinks

    The YS Resilience Network local chapter of Green Drinks will meet on Wednesday, June 24, 6–8 p.m. for a tour of a straw bale home and a passive house.

  • Schenck incident prompts concerns— Crisis training for police supported

    In recent years, area police officers have noticed a change in their work, as their calls more frequently involve people with mental health issues.

  • Glen Helen kicks off series on environment— Thinking many generations ahead

    CarolCarolyn Raffensperger, here speaking at a TED event in Maui, Hawaii, will lecture on Friday at 7 p.m. in the Glen Helen Auditorium on the precautionary principle as a way to stem the environmental pollution that threatens the lives of future generations. (Submitted photo)yn Raffensperger`

    Not only does U.S. law not protect Americans seven generations from now, it allows the continued creation of environmental toxins that will be hazardous to those in the ten-thousandth generation, according to environmental lawyer Carolyn Raffensperger.

  • Canadian David Suzuki speaks after film— Environmental icon comes to YS

    Canadian environmentalist Dr. David Suzuki will speak at the Little Art Theatre in Yellow Springs following the screening of his autobiographical film, Force of Nature, at 7 p.m. on Sunday, April 15. (Submitted photo)

    If you had one last lecture to give, what would you say? In the film Force of Nature, Dr. David Suzuki, known as the godfather of the environmental movement in Canada, delivers a legacy lecture indicting humanity for undermining the planet’s life support systems.