Dec
18
2017
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Articles About environmental sustainability

  • Community Solutions — Agraria vision takes root

    Locally based poet Ed Davis read some of his work during a community dinner in August to celebrate Community Solutions’ Agraria project. The dinner, featuring locally sourced foods, was held in the property’s 7,000-square-foot barn. (Submitted Photo)

    More than six months after the Arthur Morgan Institute for Community Solutions signed the necessary papers to purchase its new 128-acre property on the western edge of the village, a comprehensive vision for the land is solidifying.

  • Fixing up ‘stuff,’ building bonds

    Deborah Dillon brought her “chirping” 46-year-old clock radio to last Saturday’s Repair Café, a free event for repairing household items such as clothing, furniture, lamps, computers and other small electronics. Duard Headley, also pictured, was one of the volunteer “fixers.” The Repair Café was organized by Kat Walter of YS Time Exchange. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    Twenty-five people brought items ranging from laptops to old slippers to electric boot driers to the recent Repair Café at the Bryan Center, organized by the Yellow Springs Time Exchange. There were nine volunteer “fixers” on hand to help.

  • Sale puts farmland at risk

    The 267-acre Arnovitz property is slated to go to auction March 16 in nine parcels. (YS News map)

    At Village Council’s Feb. 21 meeting, a villager and Village Council member urged villagers to come together in an effort to preserve farmland at risk of development on the western edge of Yellow Springs.

  • Local food activists strategize, plan for a commercial kitchen

    Last fall about 50 people toured the High Street garden of Al Schlueter, shown above gesturing during the tour. A second tour of Schlueter’s garden, along with those of Macy Reynolds and the Antioch Farm, takes place this Sunday, Aug. 14, beginning at 10:30 a.m. in the parking lot behind the Wellness Center. (Submitted photo)

    A growing interest among villagers around local food has led to an ambitious effort to make the village a regional food hub, with an initial step of creating a commercial kitchen as the first component of a community economic incubator.

  • Plan, curtail for climate goals

    Faith Morgan and Pat Murphy outside their new nonprofit, Plan Curtail, located on East Whiteman Street. Through its website at www.plancurtail.org, the organization provides research, perspectives, metrics and methods to individuals seeking to make meaningful lifestyle changes to lower their carbon dioxide emissions. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    Villagers Faith Morgan and Pat Murphy believe planning a personal energy budget and curtailing personal energy use are the essential actions individuals can take to help slow global warming.

  • The Rumpke Landfill and Recycling Center: a YS News pictorial

    An article published in this week’s paper discusses a recent tour of the Rumpke landfill and recycling center organized by Vickie Hennessy and Zero Waste Yellow Springs. Words cannot do the facilities justice.

  • Seeding a food revolution

    Here in the heart of industrial agriculture, a quiet revolution has begun. It’s small-scale, and plans to stay that way. Its dimensions are measured not in acres, but millimeters. (Submitted photo)

    Here in the heart of industrial agriculture, a quiet revolution has begun. It’s small-scale, and plans to stay that way. Its dimensions are measured not in acres, but millimeters.

  • Yellow Springs Resilience Network ramps up efforts

    In January local members of the Yellow Springs Resilience Network toured a green building on the campus of Oberlin College which features solar panels, geothermal heating and cooling and a “living machine” waste recycling system. From left are Dave Westneat, Kat Walker, Duard Headley, Al Schlueter and Rick Walkey. (Submitted photo by Eric Johnson)

    Yellow Springs Resilience Network hopes to insulate the village from the worst impacts of climate change.

  • Antioch College is a real food leader

    Antioch College Food Service Coordinator Isaac Delamatre joined students Sara Brooks and Rhianna Guerin on the Antioch Farm last week to talk about a growing group of 35 colleges and universities who have committed to consume at least 20 percent real food (local, humane, ecologically sound and fair trade) by 2020. Though new to the Real Food Challenge, the college is already leading the way with a pledge of 60 percent real food by 2020. (Photo by Laruren Heaton)

    According to Antioch Food Service Coordinator Isaac Delamatre, 56 percent of Antioch’s food is considered “real”, meaning sourced from locally owned, ecologically sound, humane farms with fair employment practices.

  • Village Council denies appeal to stop solar array

    At its July 21 meeting, Village Council voted unanimously to deny an appeal of Planning Commission’s June 23 decision to allow a solar array at Antioch College. The decision means that the college solar project is allowed to go forward.

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