Aug
30
2015
Chance of a Thunderstorm
Saturday
High 85° / Low 66°
Chance of a Thunderstorm
Sunday
High 86° / Low 64°

Articles About environmental sustainability

  • Seeding a food revolution

    Here in the heart of industrial agriculture, a quiet revolution has begun. It’s small-scale, and plans to stay that way. Its dimensions are measured not in acres, but millimeters. (Submitted photo)

    Here in the heart of industrial agriculture, a quiet revolution has begun. It’s small-scale, and plans to stay that way. Its dimensions are measured not in acres, but millimeters.

  • Yellow Springs Resilience Network ramps up efforts

    In January local members of the Yellow Springs Resilience Network toured a green building on the campus of Oberlin College which features solar panels, geothermal heating and cooling and a “living machine” waste recycling system. From left are Dave Westneat, Kat Walker, Duard Headley, Al Schlueter and Rick Walkey. (Submitted photo by Eric Johnson)

    Yellow Springs Resilience Network hopes to insulate the village from the worst impacts of climate change.

  • Antioch College is a real food leader

    Antioch College Food Service Coordinator Isaac Delamatre joined students Sara Brooks and Rhianna Guerin on the Antioch Farm last week to talk about a growing group of 35 colleges and universities who have committed to consume at least 20 percent real food (local, humane, ecologically sound and fair trade) by 2020. Though new to the Real Food Challenge, the college is already leading the way with a pledge of 60 percent real food by 2020. (Photo by Laruren Heaton)

    According to Antioch Food Service Coordinator Isaac Delamatre, 56 percent of Antioch’s food is considered “real”, meaning sourced from locally owned, ecologically sound, humane farms with fair employment practices.

  • Village Council denies appeal to stop solar array

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    At its July 21 meeting, Village Council voted unanimously to deny an appeal of Planning Commission’s June 23 decision to allow a solar array at Antioch College. The decision means that the college solar project is allowed to go forward.

  • Help spread pancake cheer at the Glen

    Brian Maughan indulged at the Glen's last breakfast in 2011.

    The Glen needs volunteers to put on its once again annual Pancake Breakfast friend-raiser next weekend.

  • Antioch College Farm raises animals, concerns

    A conceptual rendering of the Antioch College farm by farm manager Kat Christen illustrates the multi-use plans the college envisions for the property long known as the golf course. Representatives from the college will present a revised land-use plan to Village Council on Monday, Aug. 5, with hopes of getting the zoning code to permit a certain number of farm animals on the property, to be used mostly for academic experimentation in sustainable agriculture. (Map courtesy of Antioch College)

    The farming activity on what is affectionately known as the Antioch golf course is just beginning, and it’s the heart of what Antioch College envisions for its sustainability program, one of the key components of the college curriculum.

  • Antioch College, Glen Helen begin reforestation

    Antioch College environmental science professor Linda Fuselier, left, and Glen Helen extension naturalist Jennifer Lang will use a grant from the National Center for Science and Civic Engagement to launch an education and action program this fall to replace the Glen’s invasive honeysuckle with native understory species. (Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    If one of the key components of an effective education is giving people the tools to make positive change, then Antioch College, Glen Helen and the host of conscientious villagers here are in a strong position to help save the environment.

  • Getting from waste to want not

    The busy bugs of EnviroFlight are churning out a new product this year — a natural fertilizer that some say is making area tomato plants grow like weeds.

  • State funds Antioch co-ops

    Following through on its commitment to agricultural and environmental sustainability in both campus life and curriculum, Antioch College last week cemented a partnership with the state to establish several dozen cooperative job positions for students

  • Flush with water— Thinking conservation amidst plenty

    Laurie Dreamspinner used the water from one of the four rain barrels connected to her downspouts to water the marigolds, peas and herbs she grows in her front and side yards. The stormwater reclamation saves her money and the already wet area unneeded runoff. (Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    Ask villagers about their experience with Yellow Springs water and the stories will flow.