Articles About environmental sustainability :: Page 3

  • A group to support greening

    Kate LeVesconte showed off her garden and brand new bicycle carrier, which she fills with groceries from town for carbon-free transport to her home on Glen View Road. LeVesconte shares these energy conservation techniques at monthly meetings of the Ten Percent Club. (photo by Megan Bachman)

    Clinical psychologist Kate LeVesconte knows that support groups encourage positive behavior. So when she became concerned about the dangers of carbon fuel use, LeVesconte co-created an energy conservation support group, where people help each other live more sustainably.

  • Forest gardens in your own yard

    Permaculturist Dave Jacke hugged a stinging nettle plant at a farm homestead on Hustead Road, where he will teach a seven-day workshop on creating edible forest gardens next week. Jacke will also give a free public lectures at the Glen Helen building on homescale food production and enhancing soil fertility on Aug. 9 and 11.

    Growing food in a backyard garden can be a lot of work. But by designing a “forest garden” of trees and shrubs, aligned with ecological principles, gardeners can achieve a food yield sustainably, with less maintenance. This is the essence of a seven-day forest gardening workshop from Aug. 9 to Aug. 15 on a farm homestead north of Yellow Springs on Hustead Road…

  • Tell me how your garden grows

    Eric Johnson, Stephanie Elsass and Ed Amrhein survey the Bill Duncan neighborhood garden (photo by Aaron Zaremsky)

    The steering committee for the local neighborhood gardens met to discuss the future of the project last Friday.

  • Green towns offer new ideas

    As sustainability gains ground as an integral component of city planning, many municipalities across the country are creating ways to use less energy and ensure that the energy they use comes from renewable sources.

  • The 3 percent solution for energy use

    When the Village’s electric power supplier looks into the future, its leaders assume that the village’s need for electricity will increase by about 1 percent each year. But with much of the supply currently coming from carbon–emitting coal plants, villagers and Village leaders have been looking for ways not to be such predictable power consumers.

  • 2 For 1 business reduces energy use

    Local residents Dan Rudolf, at left, and Bob Brecha (not pictured) have joined with business partners Dan Swank, center, and Lieb Lurie, right, to start 2 for 1 Energy, a one-stop energy audit and home retrofit business in the village.

    Trying to change the mindset of the masses is a mass production job — at least that’s how the new business 2 For 1 Energy is approaching the task. The object: getting residents to pay to retrofit their homes for greater energy efficiency.

  • The ‘can man’ recycles as ‘homage to Mother Nature’

    Longtime villager and former Antioch College faculty member Michael Kraus recently collected several hundred discarded aluminum cans on a 50-mile trip down the bike trail, a typical load for the ride he takes three times a week.

    While a high school Latin teacher in Cincinnati, Michael Kraus couldn’t stand to watch students throw their soda cans in the trash. So he spent his afternoons digging through garbage bins to retrieve and recycle them.

  • Passive House is an active goal

    Andrew and Anisa Kline of Green Generation Building Company stand at the construction site of their Yellow Springs Passive House on Dayton Street, which will be completed in July. They hope their structure meets the rigorous energy efficiency standards of the Passive House.

    Andrew Kline is already the youngest builder in Yellow Springs. But the 29-year-old general contractor also wants to be the greenest. With his newly formed company, Green Generation Building, and the construction of his first energy-efficient home nearing completion, Kline is well on his way to establishing himself as a green builder. If Kline and […]

  • Land trust guest speaker advises sustainable farming

    David Montgomery

    Professor and author David Montgomery thinks everyone should be concerned about where their food comes from and how its grown. In his presentation for the Tecumseh Land Trust’s “Stories of People and the Land” series on Tuesday night, the soil expert urged no-till, organic farming practices that preserve local agricultural soils rather than deplete them.

  • Antioch Underground

    Drilling on the front lawn of the Antioch College to determine the feasibility of using geothermal heating

    On Friday, April 9, employees of Crabtree Drilling of Springfield and Eaton Drilling of West Liberty drilled 300 feet down on the front lawn of the Antioch College campus in a first step toward determining the feasibility of using geothermal heating on campus. (Click on the headline to read more)

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