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Articles About environmental sustainability :: Page 3

  • GCCC upgrades are good for the earth and pocketbook

    Local architect Ted Donnell recently led the design of an energy upgrade at the Greene County Career Center. From the center’s new insulated roof, Donnell stood proudly before the just-installed geothermal well field (left) and a natural wetland to process waste, both of which he conceived. (photo by Megan Bachman)

    When local architect Ted Donnell began working with the Greene County Career Center five years ago, he brought with him an environmental ethic that culminated in a $6.1 million energy upgrade over the summer, replete with geothermal heating and cooling and an insulated roof.

  • Vernay is potential solar site

    At their Sept. 7 meeting, Village Council members took their first official step toward adding solar power to the Village energy portfolio when they unanimously approved the first reading of an ordinance for an AMP solar energy subscription package.

  • Murphy examines cars, consumption

    Recently Pat Murphy of Community Solutions published his third book on energy conservation, Spinning Our Wheels, in which he examines myths about the electric car.

    Electric cars may not be the answer to reducing our dependence on fossil fuels, says local author Pat Murphy in his recently-released book, Spinning Our Wheels. Instead, Murphy proposes, we should share rides to increase transportation’s efficiency and reduce the number of total cars on the road.

  • A group to support greening

    Kate LeVesconte showed off her garden and brand new bicycle carrier, which she fills with groceries from town for carbon-free transport to her home on Glen View Road. LeVesconte shares these energy conservation techniques at monthly meetings of the Ten Percent Club. (photo by Megan Bachman)

    Clinical psychologist Kate LeVesconte knows that support groups encourage positive behavior. So when she became concerned about the dangers of carbon fuel use, LeVesconte co-created an energy conservation support group, where people help each other live more sustainably.

  • Forest gardens in your own yard

    Permaculturist Dave Jacke hugged a stinging nettle plant at a farm homestead on Hustead Road, where he will teach a seven-day workshop on creating edible forest gardens next week. Jacke will also give a free public lectures at the Glen Helen building on homescale food production and enhancing soil fertility on Aug. 9 and 11.

    Growing food in a backyard garden can be a lot of work. But by designing a “forest garden” of trees and shrubs, aligned with ecological principles, gardeners can achieve a food yield sustainably, with less maintenance. This is the essence of a seven-day forest gardening workshop from Aug. 9 to Aug. 15 on a farm homestead north of Yellow Springs on Hustead Road…

  • Tell me how your garden grows

    Eric Johnson, Stephanie Elsass and Ed Amrhein survey the Bill Duncan neighborhood garden (photo by Aaron Zaremsky)

    The steering committee for the local neighborhood gardens met to discuss the future of the project last Friday.

  • Green towns offer new ideas

    As sustainability gains ground as an integral component of city planning, many municipalities across the country are creating ways to use less energy and ensure that the energy they use comes from renewable sources.

  • The 3 percent solution for energy use

    When the Village’s electric power supplier looks into the future, its leaders assume that the village’s need for electricity will increase by about 1 percent each year. But with much of the supply currently coming from carbon–emitting coal plants, villagers and Village leaders have been looking for ways not to be such predictable power consumers.

  • 2 For 1 business reduces energy use

    Local residents Dan Rudolf, at left, and Bob Brecha (not pictured) have joined with business partners Dan Swank, center, and Lieb Lurie, right, to start 2 for 1 Energy, a one-stop energy audit and home retrofit business in the village.

    Trying to change the mindset of the masses is a mass production job — at least that’s how the new business 2 For 1 Energy is approaching the task. The object: getting residents to pay to retrofit their homes for greater energy efficiency.

  • The ‘can man’ recycles as ‘homage to Mother Nature’

    Longtime villager and former Antioch College faculty member Michael Kraus recently collected several hundred discarded aluminum cans on a 50-mile trip down the bike trail, a typical load for the ride he takes three times a week.

    While a high school Latin teacher in Cincinnati, Michael Kraus couldn’t stand to watch students throw their soda cans in the trash. So he spent his afternoons digging through garbage bins to retrieve and recycle them.