Articles About eye on the economy

  • Villagers rate ED strategies

    THUMB_Print

    As an adjunct English professor at Clark State Community College, Cyndi Pauwels is among the one-third of Yellow Springs residents who work in the field of education and four-fifths of working villagers who commute.

  • How locals see our economy

    THUMB_Economy

    Local jobs don’t pay enough for people to afford to live here.
    That’s how many villagers summed up the problem with the Yellow Springs economy in a recent online survey.
    A total of 299 residents of Yellow Springs and Miami Township participated in the 20-question survey, which ran from April 25–May 11.

  • Small towns use creativity to grow

    THUMB_Economy

    The story of Ponca City, Okla., recently named one of the top 10 best small towns for business in the U.S. , is a case study for how to rebuild a flagging small town economy.

  • Sidewalks packed in tourist town

    Tourists by the Chamber of Commers in Yellow Springs.

    Any local resident downtown on a beautiful spring weekend such as we’ve experienced in recent weeks can attest that the sidewalks, shops and restaurants are filled with people who hail from other zip codes. What their presence means to the life of the village is a topic of ongoing discussions.

  • Economic development since 2000— Ideas abound, actions lag behind

    THUMB_Print

    Around 1998 local attorney Craig Matthews was representing a Dayton company that worked with that city to boost the economy in depressed neighborhoods. Around the same time, he found, in an old box in his office above Star Bank, a copy of Arthur Morgan’s book, Industries for Small Communities, with Morgan’s philosophy that vibrant small towns need diverse, vibrant businesses.

  • In 80s, incubator boosted businesses in Yellow Springs

    THUMB_Economy

    One of Village government’s first attempts at revving up the economy involved hiring villagers Vicki Morgan and Phyllis Schmidt in 1986 as Yellow Springs Associates, in an attempt to improve the image of Yellow Springs to surrounding communities.

  • At time, home is where the work is

    THUMB_Print

    Like many of today’s college graduates, Emma Woodruff left Antioch College under a mountain of debt and with few job prospects. So she fell into a growing local industry catering to tourists and residents — accommodation and food service — working stints as a Sunrise Café server and in the kitchen of the Emporium Café.

  • Fewer local jobs, more commuting

    Will LeVesconte assembled robotic connectors this week at the South High Street facility of local electronics distribution company Electroshield. LeVesconte, who grew up in the village and now lives in Fairborn, is one of the nearly 1,200 people who commute to Yellow Springs for their job. Commuters make up 80 percent of the local workforce. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Heidi Hoover could be considered one of the lucky few. Her dream of living and working in Yellow Springs came true seven years ago when, after returning to her hometown to start a family, she was hired as a second-grade teacher at Mills Lawn Elementary School after substitute teaching there.

  • CHARTS: More jobs trends in YS

    image

    Fewer local jobs has meant more commuting for residents, but residents are also increasingly working out of their homes and starting their own businesses. Read about more local job trends.

  • CHART: Job changes in YS

    jobs2002vs2011

    What are the predominant local jobs in Yellow Springs and where do Yellow Springers work? A new article explores the trend that fewer local jobs means more commuting for residents.

12