Articles About healthcare

  • Local psychologist joins west, east in healing

    Few conventional medicine providers give much credence to traditional medicine, whose practitioners don’t often seek mainstream credentials. Dr. Rose Mary Shaw bridges both worlds.

  • Film ‘Escape Fire’ seeks healthcare transformation

    Antioch University Midwest is sponsoring a free documentary, ‘Escape Fire: The Fight to Rescue American Healthcare,’ at the school on Wednesday, Feb. 27 at 6 p.m., with refreshments at 5:30 p.m. Shown above is Kent De Spain, the new chair of the school’s program for healthcare consumer advocacy/patient navigation. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    The American health care system is so broken that fixing it requires a major conceptual transformation.

  • Villagers Agna, Reynolds honored

    Mary Agna, left, and Macy Reynolds, were recently nominated to the Greene County Women’s Hall of Fame for their work in healthcare (Agna) and horticulture (Reynolds). The women will be inducted into the Hall of Fame on Saturday, Sept. 24, at the Walnut Grove Country Club in Xenia. The deadline for reservations is Sept. 17. (Photos by Megan Bachman)

    When villagers Mary Agna and Macy Reynolds are inducted next week into the Greene County Women’s Hall of Fame, they will be among 23 other local women to receive the honor.

  • AUM leads health advocacy

    Already a pioneer in its training of advocates who help guide patients and families through the healthcare system, Antioch University Midwest’s Healthcare Consumer Advocacy Certificate Program is now looking to spur new collaborations among healthcare providers in the Miami Valley.

  • AUM to train caregivers

    A patient in the American health care system has many needs, only some of which can be met by a doctor. In fact, before even seeing a physician, some patients must make a dozen decisions regarding health care options, providers and facilities, insurance, transportation and home front support…

  • Mad as hell over health care

    Last Wednesday afternoon at the Emporium, a crowd of about 50 villagers stood up and yelled on cue, “I’m mad as hell, and I’m not gonna take it anymore!” Then they raised their right hands and took an oath to support a single payer health insurance system.

    “On my honor as a health care advocate,” they began in unison, “I will do everything I can to help us develop a system of payment that redirects all current health care monies, both public and private, into a single public fund that covers everyone.”

  • Clinic leaves town for now

    The Wright State physicians who operate the Yellow Springs Family Health Center at the corner of Xenia Avenue and Herman Street are temporarily relocating to Greene Memorial Hospital in Xenia at the end of next month. According to health center Medical Director Cynthia Olsen, she hopes to unyoke the practice from a rapidly deteriorating facility and raise funds for a smaller, more efficient building in the same location as the original.

  • After 48 years, Dr. Englefield has retirement in his sights

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    After almost five decades as an optometrist, there’s just one thing that still knocks the socks off Dr. Robert Englefield — and that’s the miracle of human sight. “When you realize there’s this never-ending light that comes in and stimulates the eye and then sends messages to the brain that lets it become a vision — I’ve never stopped being amazed,” he said.

  • Council split on land plan

    At the June 1 meeting of Yellow Springs Village Council, Council members differed sharply on the appropriateness of Council making changes in the Village Comprehensive Land Use Plan at this time. The plan was recently revised by the Planning Commission and submitted to Council for approval.

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