Articles About locally-grown food

  • At winter market, greens in the gray

    A good crowd turned out for the first winter farm market of the season last Saturday, held in the basement of the United Methodist church. Shown above, market co-organizer Amy Magnus buys some fresh greens from the produce of Patchwork Farm near Trotwood, helped by Patchwork employee Kate Salatin. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    The Yellow Springs Winter Farmers Marketlaunched its third season last Saturday, Jan. 7, in the basement of the First Methodist Church.

  • A radical, rooted farm vision

    A layer hen perched on top of a motorcycle was not a strange sight at Amy Batchman’s new Radical Roots Farm on West Jackson Road, where Batchman plans to grow perennials, teach mechanics courses for women and move old barns. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Where can you learn how to repair a tractor, help move a barn, have chicks raised for you and eventually pick your own strawberries and buy fresh-pressed apple cider vinegar and hazelnut oil, all from a 29-year-old woman?

  • “Radical” farm takes root

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    Amy Batchman started Radical Roots Farm outside of Yellow Springs with big plans for the seven-acre homestead.

  • Forests for local food

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    Mark Shepard told a crowd of 120 villagers to transform our farm fields into forests for more local food.

  • Year-round harvest— A field of greens among the white

    John DeWine and Michele Burns stood amongst the prolific kale of the wood-heated greenhouse at their Yellow Springs-Fairfield Road farmstead, Flying Mouse Farms. Their farm is the only source of local greens for direct purchase in the winter.

    At Flying Mouse Farms in Yellow Springs, there is no off-season.

  • Whey to go: local cheese arrives

    Nick Mronzinski stirred curds at Young’s Jersey Dairy in a cheese vat that has been used to turn the farm’s fresh milk into local cheese for the last 18 months. The yellow cheddar cheese made on a recent visit will be used to top burgers and salads at Young’s restaurants.

    Those who prefer local foods can now add a variety of locally-produced cheese to their diets, thanks to two area dairies that have recently been turning fresh milk into cheese.

  • Corner-copia: saag paneer in winter, the homemade way

    Akhilesh and Pratibha Nigam recently opened the Indian Food Corner at the Corner Cone restaurant. The couple, who formerly owned Nigam’s in Beavercreek, serve freshly made Indian food from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays, and noon to 4 p.m. Sundays. (photo by Diane Chiddister)

    When Akhilesh and Pratibha Nigam arrive at the Indian Food Corner — located at Corner Cone on Dayton and Walnut Streets — in the morning, they start each dish from scratch. If they’re making saag paneer — which they undoubtedly are, since the spinach/cheese favorite is one of their five menu items…

  • Hatching New Liberty Farm

    Local residents Richard Taylor and Kat Krehbiel launched the first phase of their local food and independent living corporation with a chicken and water buffalo farm on Mosier Road in Yellow Springs. (photo by Lauren Heaton)

    The butter-yellow chicks twittering about in their baby blue swimming pools look and sound happy and healthy. Though in about six weeks, most of them will become someone’s dinner, their brief lives will be spent frolicking with their brothers and sisters with plenty of grains, bugs and grass to eat. The folks at New Liberty Farms would have it no other way.

  • Forest gardens in your own yard

    Permaculturist Dave Jacke hugged a stinging nettle plant at a farm homestead on Hustead Road, where he will teach a seven-day workshop on creating edible forest gardens next week. Jacke will also give a free public lectures at the Glen Helen building on homescale food production and enhancing soil fertility on Aug. 9 and 11.

    Growing food in a backyard garden can be a lot of work. But by designing a “forest garden” of trees and shrubs, aligned with ecological principles, gardeners can achieve a food yield sustainably, with less maintenance. This is the essence of a seven-day forest gardening workshop from Aug. 9 to Aug. 15 on a farm homestead north of Yellow Springs on Hustead Road…

  • CSAs for good food, local focus

    Doug Christen plants summer squash seeds at Smaller Footprint Farm, a certified “naturally-grown” farm that supplies vegetables for 30 local families. Farm shares, which cost $425 for 20 weeks of fresh produce, are available for the 2010 season. (Photo by Aaron Zaremsky)

    Both Smaller Footprint Farm and Heartbeat Community Farm have thrived since going into business in 2006 by growing vegetables directly for their members using a model called Community Supported Agriculture, or CSA for short.

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