Articles About neighborhood gardens

  • Villagers to protest garden removal

    Marilyn Van Eaton weeds a large area of perennial plants that she tends in front of her Lawson Place residence. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    After two months of attempted negotiation with Greene Metropolitan Housing Authority, the residents of Lawson Place are scheduled to lose their gardens on Monday, Oct. 1. To protest the removal of these gardens, a group of villagers is planning a rally and march on Sunday, Sept. 9

  • GMHA gardens on chopping block

    Daniel Pearson planted a low-maintenance cover crop of violets in the backyard of his Lawson Place residence. The violets don’t need to be mowed, keep the ground from getting waterlogged and provide a tasty treat to Pearson, he said. Pearson worries herbicides will be used to kill the vegetation, which is out of compliance with the property owners, Greene Metropolitian Housing Authority. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Patricia High is dejected because she has until July 1 to transplant most of her beautiful garden at her Lawson Place unit, or the Greene Metropolitan Housing Authority will remove the plantings.

  • GMHA gardens on chopping block

    Daniel Pearson planted a low-maintenance cover crop of violets in the backyard of his Lawson Place residence. The violets don’t need to be mowed, keep the ground from getting waterlogged and provide a tasty treat to Pearson, he said. Pearson worries herbicides will be used to kill the vegetation, which is out of compliance with the property owners, Greene Metropolitian Housing Authority. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Patricia High is dejected because she has until July 1 to transplant most of her beautiful garden at her Lawson Place unit, or the Greene Metropolitan Housing Authority will remove the plantings.

  • Green gardeners learn to grow

    Faith Morgan of Community Solutions started a monthly growers exchange, where expert local farmers will teach novice gardeners in exchange for a little farm labor. Here Morgan weeds her garden plot on East Whiteman Street, once tended by her grandfather, Arthur Morgan. (Photo by Megan Bachman)Faith Morgan of Community Solutions started a monthly growers exchange, where expert local farmers will teach novice gardeners in exchange for a little farm labor. Here Morgan weeds her garden plot on East Whiteman Street, once tended by her grandfather, Arthur Morgan. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Gardening is not just for green thumbs any more. As more and more local neighborhood gardens sprout, the Growers Exchange offers a forum where seasoned local growers share their knowledge with novice gardeners in exchange for labor.

  • Gardens, gardeners sprouting

    At the Bill Duncan Park neighborhood garden, Penny Adamson (left) and Emily Seibel prepared their garden bed, which last year produced five kinds of tomatoes, prolific green beans and other vegetables and flowers. Villagers can still sign up for a plot at one of four neighborhood gardens. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    What began as a modest effort to start a community garden has mushroomed to four neighborhood gardens scattered around town — with more soon to sprout.

  • Garden with your neighbors

    Al Schlueter spaded new beds last weekend at the Fair Acres neighborhood garden, where he has a plot. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Villagers can sign up to garden at one of four neighborhood garden plots around town — Bill Duncan Park, the Glass Farm, Fair Acres and Friends Care — where last year more than 50 families tilled and tended beds together.

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