Dec
18
2017
Rain
Monday
High 44° / Low 39°
Partly Cloudy
Tuesday
High 52° / Low 30°

Articles About protest

  • Taking the knee, together

    Protesters at Saturday’s action took a knee and sang the national anthem while kneeling on one knee, a gesture of solidarity with NFL players who have done the same during the anthem. Pictured here, from left, are villagers Kelly Fox, Tina Fox, Dan Dixon, Maria Bakari, Sherry Walker and Aiysha Walker. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    At least 65 local protesters “took the knee” for racial justice last Saturday.

  • Activists are awake and watching

    Yellow Springs resident Susan Alberter (left front), the driving force behind Greene County Indivisible: Awake and Watching, was among a number of group members who participated in a rally Tuesday, Sept. 5, in downtown Dayton to protest the president’s efforts to rescind President Barack Obama’s executive order known as DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. An estimated 100 people, many from Yellow Springs, gathered outside U.S. Rep. Mike Turner’s regional office to urge Turner to help retain the legal status of 800,000 young people called “Dreamers.” (Photo by Carol Simmons)

    They’ve been dressing up in chicken suits each Monday and visiting downtown Dayton with signs suggesting that U.S. Representative Mike Turner, whose regional office is there, might be “a chicken” for not meeting yet this year with local constituents in a town hall setting.

  • A Free Press in a State of Hate

    Resist!

    I’ve noticed that many around us are feeling overwhelmed and fatigued. Through listening, I’ve learned that what many of us are experiencing in this intensity for the first time is what billions of people of color feel each and every day.

  • Vigils to resume with new executions

    After a 3½-year moratorium on executions, Ohio prison officials are preparing to put convicted killer Ronald Phillips to death on Tuesday, July 26. Villager Carl Hyde plans to be in vigil outside Lucasville Prison.

  • Some pull ‘green’ from local bank

    At least 90 people turned out for a peaceful protest at U.S. Bank last Saturday, including one of the youngest in the crowd, Harriet Christle, nearly 3, pictured here with her paper bird. Organized by villager MJ Gentile, Saturday’s action sought to highlight U.S. Bank’s lending ties to the Dakota Access Pipeline and private prison operators. Several demonstrators closed their accounts Saturday, while others sent letters to the bank’s CEO to express their concerns. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    Megan Bachman has been banking with U.S. Bank since she was 15 years old. “It was the first account I ever had,” she said. But last Saturday, Feb. 4, she decided to move her money elsewhere.

  • Community unity powers D.C. Women’s March

    After riding through the night via chartered bus, and deposited in a Washington, D.C., parking lot after sunrise Saturday, Jan. 21, 55 women from Yellow Springs prepared to join hundreds of thousands of people from across the country streaming toward the National Mall for Saturday’s Women’s March on Washington. The bus passengers represented a portion of village residents who particpated in the historic event. (Submitted photo by Lydia, the busdriver)

    Local preparation for last weekend’s Women’s March on Washington may have been as significant for many Yellow Springs women, and for the community at large, as the actual march itself.

  • Protest in Dayton to stop ban on refugees and H-1B travel

    A protest against the Trump administration's recent ban on Syrian refugees and Muslim immigrants will be held Sunday, Jan. 29, from 3–5 p.m. at 120 W 3rd St. in Dayton. (Image via Pixabay)

    Yellow Springs resident Rebecca Potter has organized a rally in Dayton this Sunday to protest the Trump administration’s immigration ban on Syrian refugees and people seeking entry to the United States from several other predominantly Muslim countries.

  • Monumental Women’s Marches in YS, D.C. and elsewhere

    At least 250 villagers took to the sidewalks in downtown Yellow Springs last Saturday, Jan. 21, marching in solidarity with the Women’s March on Washington and hundreds of other marches around the country and world. The local Sister March was organized by McKinney Middle School seventh-graders Carina Basora and Ava Schell, who set out to create a positive event for all ages in support of equality and women’s rights. Judging by the march’s impressive attendance and joyful vibe — and the abundance of young, determined marchers, including, from left, Oskar Dennis, Malaya Booth and Vivian Bryan — they succeeded. (Photo by Matt Minde)

    Photographs tell some of the story of the Women’s March on Washington, a show of solidarity, support for women’s rights and protest against the policies and stances of President Trump. Here, we’ve gathered images from Yellow Springs, Dayton, D.C. and elsewhere.

  • Village Council— Policing issues dominate Council

    The fractious aftermath of the New Year’s Eve Ball Drop dominated Village Council’s Jan. 17 meeting, with both Village leaders and community members presenting initiatives for helping to better relations between villagers and local police.

  • Big small steps

    An impressively attended Sister March to the Women's March on Washington, D.C. made its way through Yellow Springs Saturday, Jan. 21. Among the many young, determined marchers, from left, were Oskar Dennis, Malaya Booth and Vivian Bryan. (Photo by Matt Minde)

    At least 250 villagers took to the sidewalks in downtown Yellow Springs last Saturday, Jan. 21, marching in solidarity with the Women’s March on Washington and hundreds of other marches around the country and world.

Page 1 of 212