Nov
22
2017
Clear
Wednesday
High 36° / Low 25°
Partly Cloudy
Thursday
High 43° / Low 28°

Articles About race relations

  • Council on policing— Guidelines stress anti-racism

    At Village Council’s July 3 meeting, Council members unanimously approved adopting new guidelines for policing that take a proactively inclusive and anti-racist stance.

  • Focus on racial incidents at Yellow Springs schools

    Yellow Springs school district leaders were urged to hire more people of color and provide more racial sensitivity training for school staff and students at a meeting Monday, June 26, at First Baptist Church.

  • Racial factors in Crawford’s shooting

    People gathered last Saturday, July 30, at Courthouse Square in Dayton to protest the delay in the Department of Justice investigation of the police shooting death of John Crawford III, which took place Aug. 5, 2014. Shown above are, from left, Lynn Buffington and Don Nguyen of Beavercreek and Ndidi Achebe and Rachel Feltner of Dayton. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    Fourth article in this series: Beginning in the early 2000s, Joshua Correll, a social psychology researcher now at the University of Colorado, began a series of studies examining the effect of race on shoot/don’t shoot decisions.

  • Revisiting Crawford, two years on

    Yellow Springs residents played a large role in calling for justice after the 2014 police shooting of John Crawford III in a Beavercreek Walmart. Here, from left, villagers Joan Chappelle, Cheryl Smith and Bomani Moyenda were among area residents demonstrating at the Greene County courthouse in Xenia in December of 2014. Nearly two years after Crawford’s shooting, many questions remain. (News archive Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    First article in this series: The shooting of John Crawford and other young African-American men by police raised urgent questions about use of force, police relations with African-American communities and the role of race and racism in the justice system.

  • Grandson’s heart-breaking question inspires a new book

    Villager Julia Davis, former Yelliow Springs High School history teacher, recently published her new book, “I Like My Brown Skin Because... Celebrating the Heritage of African American Children.” (Photo by Carol Simmons)

    What began as a letter written to her 4-year-old grandson while he napped has become a 142-page, 12-chapter, hard-cover book earning praise from prestigious review boards and lay readers alike for its author, villager Julia Davis.

  • Black Lives Matter marks a year — Message of justice carries on

    Dozens of people participated in a rally and die-in at the Beavercreek Walmart on Wednesday, Aug. 5, to commemorate the life of John Crawford III, who was killed by police in the store a year ago. The event was organized by Black Lives Matter Miami Valley and included many local residents. (Photo by Dylan Taylor-Lehman)

    On Aug. 5, 2015, over 200 people gathered in the parking lot of the Beavercreek Walmart to commemorate the life and mourn the death of John Crawford III.

  • Antioch College historian eyes race, community

    Kevin McGruder, assistant professor of history at Antioch College, will discuss his latest book, Race and Real Estate: Conflict and Cooperation in Harlem 1890–1920, on Tuesday, Aug. 4. at 7 p.m. at McGregor 113 on the college campus. He will also sign copies of this book, which was recently published by Columbia University Press. (Photo By diane chiddister)

    But Kevin McGruder, assistant professor of history at Antioch College, tells the story of early white Harlem residents who appeared to hold diverse views of their African-American neighbors. And he believes that Harlem was originally a place of aspiration for the blacks who moved there.

  • Mixed Mamas explore identity

    Stacy Rene Erenberg, left, and Sage Morgan-Hubbard will perform the “Mixed Mamas Remix Vol. 2,” a performance piece of poetry, movement and song, on Friday, April 10, at 8 p.m. at the Antioch College Foundry Theater. The performance is free and open to the public. (Submitted photo)

    People of mixed racial heritage face different challenges than most when figuring out their identify, but all of us are negotiating our identity all of the time.

  • Group addresses race issues

    Are people of color targeted by police here? Are African-American students in school punished worse than their white counterparts? Are racial minorities discriminated against in downtown stores? Is local black history being lost?

  • “Mixed race discussion and other stuff” rescheduled

    Current and former Yellow Springs High School students spoke about racism in the local schools and how to empower local black youth at a panel discussion April 21 at AU Midwest. Panelists are, from left, Teresa Bondurant-Wagner, Cameron Henderson, Hafiz Mensah, Taylor Beck and Edward Johnson. (photos by Megan Bachman)

    The 365 Project has rescheduled its “Mixed Race Discussion and Other Stuff” for Saturday, March 21, at 1 p.m. at Mills Lawn School.