Jul
24
2016
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Articles About racism

  • Revisiting Crawford, two years on

    Yellow Springs residents played a large role in calling for justice after the 2014 police shooting of John Crawford III in a Beavercreek Walmart. Here, from left, villagers Joan Chappelle, Cheryl Smith and Bomani Moyenda were among area residents demonstrating at the Greene County courthouse in Xenia in December of 2014. Nearly two years after Crawford’s shooting, many questions remain. (News archive Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    The shooting of John Crawford and other young African-American men by police raised urgent questions about use of force, police relations with African-American communities and the role of race and racism in the justice system.

  • Activist presses for justice for John Crawford

    Villager Bomani Moyenda is leading a group of people, including several from Yellow Springs, seeking justice for the family of John Crawford III, who was shot by police in the Beavercreek Walmart in 2014. (Photo by Audrey Hackett)

    About 40 people gathered to hear local activist Bomani Moyenda and the Reverend Jerome McCorry, of Dayton, respond to the latest developments in the 2014 Beavercreek Walmart shooting case.

  • Spike Lee film set to spark conversations

    “Do the Right Thing,” an acclaimed 1989 film by director Spike Lee (center in Dodgers jersey), will be shown this Saturday, Feb. 20, at 11 a.m. at the Little Art Theatre. The film, which is free and open to the public, is part of the Black History Month film series sponsored by the 365 Group and Yellow Springs Young People of Color. (Still from Do the Right Thing)

    This Saturday, villagers have an opportunity to both see the now-iconic film, “Do the Right Thing,” which mirrors today’s racial tensions, and discuss it, at a free screening at 11 a.m. at the Little Art Theatre.

  • Group addresses race issues

    THUMB_VillageLife

    Are people of color targeted by police here? Are African-American students in school punished worse than their white counterparts? Are racial minorities discriminated against in downtown stores? Is local black history being lost?

  • Being black in Yellow Springs

    Young people who grew up in Yellow Springs during the 1960s were in a “racial, social and economic bubble” where kids had little awareness of race, class or economic level, according to Yellow Springs natives who will speak soon on the topic, “Being Black in Yellow Springs: The Sixties Experience.”

  • Bender honored for WWII service

    Villager Jonas Bender will be honored soon for his World War II military service, when he was part of the first group of African Americans to join the Marines. Called the Montford Point Marines, the group was subjected to racism and segregation while in the military. The group will receive the Congressional Gold Medal this spring for its contributions to the war effort. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    As a boy growing up in Mississippi, Jonas Bender knew about racism and segregation. But living in “the oasis of integration” that was the college town of Tougaloo, Bender knew about racism mainly from other people’s stories.