Articles About water quality

  • Villagers asked to conserve water

    THUMB_Government

    The Ohio EPA is asking villagers to voluntarily reduce their water usage.

  • YSI Inc. immerses kids in water

    Mills Lawn Elementary School fifth and sixth graders took a field trip last week to YSI Inc. (a Xylem brand) to learn about local and global water issues as part of a collaboration with the water-monitoring equipment manufacturer. YSI/Xylem has also purchased water test kits for the school to commemorate World Water Monitoring Day. Here students in Dionne Barclay’s fifth-grade class work together to keep a giant model of the earth afloat, symbolizing the need for everyone to chip in to save the planet. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    On a recent field trip, the Mills Lawn Elementary School fifth and sixth graders spent a day at YSI Inc. (a Xylem brand), learning about local and global water issues, and bounced a giant model of earth to symbolize the need for everyone to chip in to save the planet.

  • Water treatment plant repairs discolor water

    Village water treatment plant equipment repairs are discoloring water; the discoloration should improve as the week progresses.

  • Council regards water sourcing

    THUMB_Government

    At their Feb. 4 meeting, Village Council members and Village Manager Laura Cur­liss began a discussion on the best way to source Village water.

  • A tale of two waters

    Soon, Council will choose between upgrading its aging water plant or purchasing water from Springfield. It seems timely, then, to compare various aspects of Yellow Springs and Springfield water.

  • YS News Water Survey Results

    WaterRatingsFull2

    See the results from a recent Yellow Springs News online survey of 205 municipal water customers.

  • Tackling hard water, hard choices

    Of all the critical decisions made by municipal governments, perhaps no decisions are more important than those concerning water.

  • Water pollution we all create— Catching up with runaway runoff

    There is a gully in the Glen at the northeast edge of the village, not far from the Glen Helen Building. When it rains, water comes rushing into the Glen, carrying with it the runoff from the village, its street oils, its lawn chemicals, and its trash.

  • Toxic sites are under control

    Over the past two decades, Vernay, along with Morris Bean & Company, YSI, Inc. and the Village Water Reclamation plant, have all been point sources of pollution to local ground and surface water. But through their efforts and work with the U.S. and Ohio Environmental Protection Agencies, all four point sources of area water pollution have made strides to control and mitigate the damage they caused to the local watershed.

  • Real watershed moments for area

    Hikers carefully navigated the stepping stones across Birch Creek in the Glen Helen Nature Preserve last weekend. The three local rivers that run through the Glen—Birch Creek, Yellow Springs Creek and the Little Miami River—drain runoff from village streets and area farms. Any contamination in the local watershed eventually makes its way into the Glen, impacting ecosystem health and recreational activities. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Where Yellow Springs begins and ends is defined by clear political boundaries. But the village also exists within an ecosystem that has boundaries of its own. An important one is its watershed, an area of land that drains into a common waterway.

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