Articles About water

  • YSI Inc. immerses kids in water

    Mills Lawn Elementary School fifth and sixth graders took a field trip last week to YSI Inc. (a Xylem brand) to learn about local and global water issues as part of a collaboration with the water-monitoring equipment manufacturer. YSI/Xylem has also purchased water test kits for the school to commemorate World Water Monitoring Day. Here students in Dionne Barclay’s fifth-grade class work together to keep a giant model of the earth afloat, symbolizing the need for everyone to chip in to save the planet. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    On a recent field trip, the Mills Lawn Elementary School fifth and sixth graders spent a day at YSI Inc. (a Xylem brand), learning about local and global water issues, and bounced a giant model of earth to symbolize the need for everyone to chip in to save the planet.

  • Water pollution we all create— Catching up with runaway runoff

    There is a gully in the Glen at the northeast edge of the village, not far from the Glen Helen Building. When it rains, water comes rushing into the Glen, carrying with it the runoff from the village, its street oils, its lawn chemicals, and its trash.

  • Real watershed moments for area

    Hikers carefully navigated the stepping stones across Birch Creek in the Glen Helen Nature Preserve last weekend. The three local rivers that run through the Glen—Birch Creek, Yellow Springs Creek and the Little Miami River—drain runoff from village streets and area farms. Any contamination in the local watershed eventually makes its way into the Glen, impacting ecosystem health and recreational activities. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Where Yellow Springs begins and ends is defined by clear political boundaries. But the village also exists within an ecosystem that has boundaries of its own. An important one is its watershed, an area of land that drains into a common waterway.

  • Village water, from the ground up

    Ted Dunevant, operator of the Yellow Springs water plant for the past 26 years, is retiring at the end of this month. He’s shown in the water plant’s pump house, the last stop for local water before it’s pumped into the village. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    You could say the Yellow Springs water system began about 425 million years ago, when a large inland sea covered the area.

  • Students take a global look at water

    Antioch College student Adam Abraham researched the history of global conflicts caused by the scarcity of water as his final project for the global seminar on the topic of water. All 35 students presented their final projects at McGregor Hall last Wednesday. (Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    Having approached the topic of water through the disciplines of art, science, history, literature, environmentalism and political science all in one semester, Antioch College faculty members Lewis Trelawny-Cassidy and David Kammler received a range of final projects that reflected their integrative model.

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