Arts Section :: Page 39

  • Group presents Chekhov as fund-raiser

    The Cherry Orchard by Anton Chekhov will be presented tonight, April 9, at 8 p.m. at Westminster Hall in the First Presbyterian Church, and next Friday and Saturday nights at the same time. The event is a fund-raiser in an effort to enhance the hall as a performance space. Shown above are, from left, actors Miriam Eckenrode, Natalie Sanders, Ali Thomas, Howard Shook and Gary Reimers.

    A group of local actors and theater enthusiasts are presenting Anton Chekhov’s The Cherry Orchard tonight, April 9, at 8 p.m. at the First Presbyterian Church, and next weekend on Friday, April 15, and Saturday, April 16, at the same time. Tickets are $10. The goal is to raise money to enhance the church’s Westminster Hall as a performance space.

  • Artist Smith celebrates YS diversity

    Village artist Johanna Smith will show her exhibit of multi media mosaics, called "Yellow Springs Potheads: A Celebration of Diversity" at Brother Bear's through April The exhibit opens with a reception this Saturday, April 2, from 6–9 p.m.

    Artist Johanna Smith’s exhibit, “Yellow Springs Potheads: A Celebration of Diversity,” will open with a reception this Saturday, April 2, from 6–9 p.m. at Brother Bear’s Cafe. The potheads are just that: heads created from recycled pots and pans, covered with mosaic glass and inspired by people in the village.

  • Expressing the inexpressable through dance

    More than 50 local dancers will perform original pieces at the Yellow Springs Community Dance Concert on Friday and Saturday, March 25–26, at 7 p.m. at Antioch’s South Gym. Dancers at a recent rehearsal are, in the front row from left to right, Emma Sturm, Theresa Thinnes, Lara Bauer, Andrea Hutson, Anna McClure, Tricia Gelmini, Erin Wolf; middle row, Jade Turner, Kira Plumer, Savanna Amos, Jennifer Johnson, Victoria Walters, Carrie Speck, Nicole Manieri, Marybeth Wolf, Miriam Eckenrode; back row, Acala Cresci, Greta Hill, Aaron Logan, Amanda Hanisch, Ali Thomas and Charlotte Walkey (obscured). (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Movement can convey more emotion than words. Just watch dancer and choreographer Tricia Gelmini, whose piece at this weekend’s community dance concert will blend sorrow and joy in an expression of loss.

  • Nonstop examines Progressive arts in small towns

    Brian Holmes and Claire Pentecost present a program on their efforts to seek progressive arts organizations in small towns. They will visit Nonstop this Friday, March 25, at 7 p.m. (Submitted photo)

    Does being an arts town mean just producing art, or also encouraging the questioning of and critical thinking about the dominant culture that artists tend to provide?

  • YSKP pulls for summer season

    YS Kids Playhouse will hold its annual fundraiser to help save the summer season at its new space on the Antioch College campus next month. Pictured are, clockwise from top left, production coordinator Tom Clevenger, board member Nadia Malarkey, director John Fleming and board member Roger Beal. (Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    Every summer for the past 15 years, YS Kids Playhouse, the little theater that could, has put on at least one musical and often two original productions. But what if suddenly there wasn’t a YSKP summer season?

  • Dr. Sherry Weaton to empower the “inner healer” at Wellness Weekend

    Wheaton

    Dr. Sherry Weaton, a Jungian workshop leader devoted to empowering the inner healer, will speak at Antioch University Midwest on Saturday, March 19, at 6:30 p.m

  • India by way of ‘Jungle Book’

    Join a singing, dancing Kaa and his coils, played by, from left, Grace Wilke, Olivia Chick, Kallyn Buckenmyer, Shekinah Williams, David Walker and Kayla Brown (obscured) this weekend as Mills Lawn School presents Bollywood Jungle Book, the all school musical, at Central State’s Robeson auditorium. Shows are Saturday, March 5, at 7 p.m. and Sunday, March 6, at 2 p.m. Tickets are on sale now at the school. (Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    As Mills Lawn students rehearse Disney’s Jungle Book for the all-school musical this year, they have begun to investigate not just the animated India, but the real life India as well.

  • ‘Tuna’ for laughs, to support theater

    Yellow Springs High School seniors Elliot Cromer, left, and Adam Zaremsky will present the two-person comedy Greater Tuna this Saturday, Feb. 26, at 8 p.m. in the Mills Lawn gym. The show is the students’ senior project, and proceeds will go to the high school theater program. (Photo by Kelsey Cundiff)

    Due to recent cuts in the school district budget, some students have chosen to use their senior projects as a way to give back to programs that have been important to them, and that now face decreased funding.

  • A red carpet affair

    The Little Art Theatre hosted an Oscar Night party last Sunday evening as a fundraiser for the non-profit.

  • ‘News’ wins top state prize

    The Yellow Springs News won the top prize in its division at last week’s annual Ohio Newspaper Association convention in Columbus.

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