Arts Section :: Page 44

  • A magical red carpet ride

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    Walking down Xenia Avenue in early spring, particularly after such a tough February, is much kinder to the soul than driving through Los Angeles traffic, or walking a red carpet. We’re glad to be home from our Oscar adventure, grateful to our beloved hometown for all the support. We heard the Little Art was packed. Friends and neighbors have been asking what it was like. I’ll do my best to answer that question here.

  • Film shows role for prison art

    Local filmmaker Joanne Caputo interviewed her nephew, John Caputo, in the Pittsburgh barbershop he opened after he was released from the Graterford state penitentiary in Pennsylvania. Villagers are invited to attend a free screening of her 40-minute documentary “Cutting Loose” at the Little Art Theatre on Friday, March 19, at 5 p.m.

    As a filmmaker who has experienced some success and some challenges, Joanne Caputo has occasionally asked herself the question, “Am I an artist?” It’s perhaps a feeling she shares with her nephew, John Caputo, who is the focus of her latest documentary. As a prisoner for 11 years at the Graterford and Harrisburg penitentiaries in Pennsylvania, John Caputo would say that art in some ways saved him. But in making a life after his release, he wonders if he is truly an artist or simply an ex-con who makes art.

  • Fairy tale-come-true for YSHS playwright contest winners

    Yellow Springs High School students wrote two out of six winning plays at a recent regional high school playwriting competition. Pictured are, from left, Stefany Lewis, Shirlisa Scott and Philip Kellogg, with teacher Desireé Nickell in back. Their pieces will be performed in the Schuster Center’s Matile Black Box Theatre this weekend, March 5, 6, and 7 at 7 pm.

    What happens when Yellow Springs High School students are challenged to spin a new yarn from urban legends and fairy tales? The result, according to organizers of a regional high school playwriting challenge, is vivid characters that dare to leap out of insightful and witty scripts up and onto the stage.

  • ‘News’ wins state awards

    At a recent convention of Ohio newspapers, the Yellow Springs News won awards for in-depth reporting, features, editorials, headlines, overall design and advertising design.

  • Worth about 1170 words

    Longtime villager Katherine Kadish is being honored by the Dayton Art Institute with an exhibit, “Katherine Kadish: Seasons,” that runs through April. The exhibit, in the museum’s north and south galleries, features paintings and monotypes from Kadish’s award-winning career. Read the story on page 7 of this week's issue.

    Copies of this and other photographs may be purchased from the News; please contact us via e-mail at ysnews {at} ysnews(.)com, or by phone, between 9:30 a.m. and 5: 30 p.m., Mon.–Fri. RELATED POSTS: Antioch art faculty exhibit edgy work at Herndon Ancient art forms a stone’s throw away Emporium to feature protester portraits

  • Virginia Hamilton book and award— Curating legacy of American writer

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    For many years after her death in 2002, the glass door to Virginia Hamilton’s writing office remained closed. Every day Arnold Adoff, her husband and writing partner, passed the office at their home in Yellow Springs, but he didn’t want to open it. Then in 2007 fellow children’s book writer Kacy Cook helped crack the vault, and out poured 35 years of research, notes, speeches and manuscripts that formed the gritty trail of an American intellectual and her life as mother, wife and prolific writer.

  • ‘The Last Truck’ is Oscar-bound

    Steve Bognar and Julia Reichert, the village’s most famous filmmakers, will become even more famous next month when they attend the Oscar awards ceremony in Los Angeles as directors of one of the five films nominated in the Best Documentary Short category.

  • Short films debut at Little Art

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    Filmmaker and villager Vanessa Query, left, has organized a festival of original short films that will be shown at the Little Art Theatre at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 21. She is shown with Little Art -Executive Director Jenny Cowperthwaite, who is enthusiastic about providing a venue for independent filmmakers.

  • YS band rocks through ages

    The abundance of musicians and music lovers is part of what makes the village unique, and among those bands, one stands out, not only for its music, but also because of its history.

  • Red carpet for film biz partners

    There are many differences in the lives of good friends Diana Scott and Donna Lynn Johnson. A practicing nurse as well as the owner of Scott Street Tavern in Springfield, Scott is also a film student at Wright State University and the mother of two children. Johnson has a teenage son and is the owner of the Main Squeeze on Xenia Avenue. In her spare time, she runs a food consulting company and previously held positions with companies like Dole and Safeway Manufacturing in her native California.

    There is, however, something that is bringing these two seemingly divergent lives together: a joint venture that they have named Mad River Films.

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