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Arts Section :: Page 54

  • Art exhibit kicks off Glen 50th celebration

    Bill Hooper and Jane Baker were among the many villagers who attended the Friday night reception for the art exhibit that features artwork inspired by the Glen. They are looking at "Glen Helen Raptor" by local sculptor Jon Hudson, created from scrap metal found in the Glen. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    A well-attended exhibit of original art created by artists inspired by the Glen kicked off the Glen’s weekend celebration of its 50th anniversary on Friday evening.

  • Summer Strings to host concert and musical bake sale

    Christina Brewer, age 14, and Shirely Mullins play the violin part of a Russian folk song during rehearsal on Tuesday.

    Shirley Mullins’ Summer Strings youth orchestra will play its 47th grand finale this Saturday night at 7 p.m. in Kings Yard. The young musicians, who are concluding a two-week camp, can also be heard playing all over the village on Saturday morning from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. as part of a musical bake sale.

  • Mayer and friends play for Presbyterian Church

    Brian Mayer and his musical friends performed at the Presbyterian Church on Saturday night. (photo by Lauren Heaton)

    Musicians shared their talents at “A Summer Spectacular,” concert held at the Presbyterian Church on Saturday. A variety of instruments were showcased, including natural horn, trombone, piano, English horn and euphonium, in addition to the vocal skills of a soprano. Listen below for concert excerpts.

  • Fairies occupy downtown

    Local artist Kathleen McMillan created flower fairies out of silk flowers, and has placed the fairies in downtown trees.

    Artist Kathleen McMillan created flower fairies and nestled them in downtown trees.

  • Sculptor inspired by clay, politics

    Local sculptor Alice Robrish is shown in her Dayton Street studio, where she’s working on a series of busts of Afghan schoolgirls.

    The building on Dayton Street looks like an unassuming garage, set well back from the street. Look closely, though, and you might notice the tables and shelves inside. This is in fact an artist’s studio, converted from a garage to a work space by local sculptor Alice Robrish.

  • NPR’s Zickefoose to lead nature workshop

    Farm Pond, Twilight by Julie Zickefoose. From "Letters From Eden," 2006.

    Author and NPR commentator Julie Zickefoose will give a workshop at the Marianist Environmental Education Center on July 9, as part of Tecumseh Land Trust’s 20th anniversary celebration, “Stories of People and the Land.”

  • Juneteenth a Scrumptious Affair

    Juneteenth pies lined up for the judges during the Juneteenth celebration

    Juneteenth celebrations included a pie contest and Motown dancing last Friday night at the Bryan Center.

  • Brian Mayer returns bearing music

    Yellow Springs native Brian Mayer, right, and his classmate Dan Mueller from Northern Illinois University played together in the school’s pep band. They will join their fellow graduates from NIU in a benefit horn, piano and vocal concert at the -First Presbyterian Church on Saturday, June 26, at 7:30 p.m. (Submitted photo)

    Yellow Springs raised Brian Mayer to love music. He began playing the trumpet at Mills Lawn, and by junior high he knew that music would be his career. He left the village to pursue that goal, and now plans to give back to the community that helped him find his gift.

  • WYSO cleans up at AP awards


    Local public radio station WYSO racked up ten awards, more than any other public radio station in the state, at the Ohio Associated Press Broadcasters 2010 luncheon in Columbus on Sunday, June 6.

  • An ancient art lives on in YS

    Michel Zurbuchen is shown carving in his studio, Sculptor’s Emporium, which is located in Millworks. Zurbuchen offers classes to those interested in learning the art of stone carving, which he says is not that difficult. (Photo by Sehvilla Mann)

    At his booth at the June Street Fair, Michel Zurbuchen sets out two benches with a stone at each, plus tools and safety glasses, and encourages all who are interested to try carving for themselves. People who had never considered taking a hammer and chisel to rock find they don’t want to stop.