Performing Arts Section :: Page 13

  • Antioch School enlivens a classic

    The cast from the Antioch School’s musical production of The Wizard of Oz tried on their costumes for a rehearsal last week. From left, Weymar Osborne as the Lion, Danny Grote as the Tin man, Henry Potts-Rubin as the Scarecrow, Cecila Comerford as Dorothy, Anna Williamson as the Wizard, Landon Rhoads as Toto, Olivia Brintlinger-Conn as Auntie Em and Jorie Seick as Mrs. Gulch. The show opens at the Clifton Opera House on Friday, May 7, at 7 p.m., and shows again on Saturday, May 8, at 2 p.m. (photo by Lauren Heaton)

    Anyone who has been alive for longer than five years has likely seen the 1939 film The Wizard of Oz. But far fewer have read The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, the novel published by Frank Baum in 1900, which the Antioch School students say is more complicated and slightly more vicious.

  • YSHS opens ‘Urinetown: The Musical’ this weekend

    Central cast figures rehearsed last week, including Anne Weigand and Adam Zaremsky, front, as Hope Cladwell and Bobby Strong, and from left, Jacob Kintner as Caldwell Cladwell, Rory Papania Officer Barrel, Elliot Cromer as Officer Lockstock, and Lauren Westendorf as Little Sally.  (photo by Lauren Heaton)

    The Yellow Springs High School/McKinney School present Urinetown: The Musical. Click on the title for showtimes and a link to an audio slideshow with stills from rehearsals and interviews with the actors.

  • ‘Urinetown’ bursts with surprises

    If viewers who haven’t heard of Urinetown: The Musical think they know what the Broadway hit is about, they don’t. If those who have heard about the show but haven’t seen it think they know how it ends, they don’t.

  • YSHS opens ‘Urinetown: The Musical’ this weekend

    Central cast figures rehearsed last week, including Anne Weigand and Adam Zaremsky, front, as Hope Cladwell and Bobby Strong, and from left, Jacob Kintner as Caldwell Cladwell, Rory Papania Officer Barrel, Elliot Cromer as Officer Lockstock, and Lauren Westendorf as Little Sally.  (photo by Lauren Heaton)

    The Yellow Springs High School/McKinney School present Urinetown: The Musical. Click on the title for showtimes and a link to an audio slideshow with stills from rehearsals and interviews with the actors.

  • College welcomes dancers back

    This weekend’s Community Dance Concert, to take place at the Antioch College south gym, will feature a wide array of villagers, including those in the photo. In the back row, from left, are Curtis Bliss, holding his son, Braiden, Stefan Turner, Amanda Hamisch and Brendan Sheehan. In the second row, from left, are Kristen Foster and Elizabeth Lutz (seated on suitcases), Amelia Tarpey (behind suitcase), Helen Reed, Jade Turner, Lucas Mulhall, Savana Amos and Charlotte Walkey. In the front row are Arielle Johnson, Jennifer Johnson, Liam Lutz, Marta Mari-Crocker and Aidan Lutz. (photo by Diane Chiddister)

    After nearly a decade of success under the guidance of Valerie Blackwell-Truitt, the Yellow Springs Community Dance Concert has a new face — three new faces, to be exact.

  • Telling stories to save the land

    Eric Wolf remembers the moment he made an emotional commitment to supporting farmland preservation. He had returned to Shelter Island outside New York City, the place where as a child he went to hunt scallops and wonder at the expanse of cornfields.

  • Dancing near the streets

    Many villagers celebrated dance last weekend, with two special Summer in the Springs events. Former Nonstop Institute dance teacher Jill Becker and friends entertained an appreciative audience Saturday afternoon with whimsical and dramatic improvisations on the Train Station lawn. Shown at top are, from left, Ali Thomas, Jamie Wilke, Dimi Reber, Tricia Gelmini, Melissa Heston, Sandy Mathern, Becker and Marybeth Francesca Wolf. Villagers also enjoyed dancing to the tunes spun by DJ Juju at the dance piazza on Saturday night at the 100 Corry Street plaza. Shown above left, Manzara Reed tried out swing moves with Jade Turner; center, Heston and Mathern improvised on Saturday afternoon; at right, Becker in a humorous piece.

    Copies of this and other photographs may be purchased from the News; please contact us via e-mail at ysnews {at} ysnews(.)com, or by phone, between 9:30 a.m. and 5: 30 p.m., Mon.–Fri. RELATED POSTS: Little folk dancing ‘Red Pants’ dance First fling of spring Fair weather festivities Entirely ‘Too Much Fun’

  • YS Kids Playhouse spotlights Bond, parkour movement

    YS Kids Playhouse kicks off its summer programming beginning Thursday at 7:30 p.m. with the opening show of A Price to Pay: Before Bond Became 007. Running for two consecutive weeks, Thursday through Sunday, the production, written by YSKP alum Daniel Malarkey, tells the story of the teenage James Bond and how he earned his lucky 007.

  • The ‘News’ off the page, on the stage

    Mad River Theater will present Off the Press, an original play about the role of the Yellow Springs News in the village, from June 5–7 at the First Presbyterian Church. Featured are, clockwise from left, Rick Walkey, Doug Hinkley, Flo Lorenz, Howard Shook, Ali Thomas and Charlotte Walkey. At the table is Lucas Hudson-Groves.

    In the text of the classified ad about a lost puppy, there is a bigger story. In the letter to the editor about a neighbor’s farm that should or shouldn’t be developed, there is a bigger story. In the sports section about a ragamuffin team that clawed its way to state, there is still a bigger story.

  • YSKP, the whole year ’round

    YSKP Education Coordinator Mary Kay Clark recently oversaw New Actors Club participants (left to right) Evelyn Greene, Ursula Kremer, Ana Smith, and Shekinah Williams as they brainstormed possible endings for their collaborative adaptation of Beatrix Potter’s The Tale of Jemima Puddle-Duck.

    Even with the loss of its Antioch Theater space last year, YS Kids Playhouse continues to build community through contemporary theater. Displaying its characteristic “the show must go on!” spirit and resourcefulness, the local arts organization has every intention to fulfill its mission of not only providing theater arts and arts education opportunities for Yellow Springs and surrounding communities, but to expand its programming year-round.