Business Section :: Page 15

  • After 48 years, Dr. Englefield has retirement in his sights

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    After almost five decades as an optometrist, there’s just one thing that still knocks the socks off Dr. Robert Englefield — and that’s the miracle of human sight. “When you realize there’s this never-ending light that comes in and stimulates the eye and then sends messages to the brain that lets it become a vision — I’ve never stopped being amazed,” he said.

  • FCC senior apartments put on hold

    The senior apartment building that Friends Care Community plans to build downtown has been delayed due to financing issues, Friends Care Director Karl Zalar said last week. Friends had hoped to break ground this spring on the project at the corner of Xenia Avenue and Limestone Street.

  • YSI acquires DAA, a new subsidiary

    YSI Incorporated has recently acquired Design Analysis Associates, Inc., or DAA, of Logan, Utah, according to a June 11 YSI press statement. “We’re very excited about this opportunity and glad they are now part of YSI,” Rick Omlor, YSI president and CEO, said in an e-mail message this week.

  • Alternative vet clinic is approved

    An alternative veterinary office will soon be a new business on the corner of Stafford and Union Streets, after Village Planning Commission approved at its Monday, June 8 meeting a proposal to turn an unoccupied house into a small clinic.

  • Run, walk for kids’ center

    Last summer Children’s Center kids enjoyed the company of three big kid volunteers. Pictured are, top row, from left to right, Jordan Wood, Pete Freeman, Makayla Douglas, Isaac Grushon, Malaya Booth and Jonah Kintner. Bottom row, Isabelle Ellis and volunteers Ben Green, Cory Thompson and Daniel Collett. Children’s Center substitute teacher Andrea Hutson is in top row, back.

    Most daycare centers raise their rates from 3 to 5 percent a year, according to Marlin Newell, director of the Community Children’s Center of Yellow Springs. But even in these trying economic times, the Children’s Center, which has raised rates only twice in the past five years, has decided against increasing fees.

  • Council tackles sustainability—Economic dialogue continues

    Should Village economic development efforts focus on strengthening local resources or working with regional partnerships? Should the bulk of money earmarked for development be used to pay a staff person, or instead to develop local resources? Is transparency appropriate to the economic development process?

  • A decade of service—Home, Inc. builds diversity, stability

    Yellow Springs native Tawn Jackson Singh moved into her first home in Yellow Springs with her husband Jai Singh in November 2008, thanks to support from Home, Inc. Tawn is a new member of the Home, Inc. board, which marks its 10th anniversary this year.

    In terms of social memory, Yellow Springs has much to draw from recent history, including the coming together for Antioch College’s revival, the public effort to save Whitehall Farm, and the effort to prevent sprawl from developing on the west edge of town. A social memory of common experiences and struggles creates the kind of community that can weather political storms, according to local resident Don Hollister, and that is the kind of community he wants to support.

  • Farmers corner new market

    Can there ever be too much locally grown, fresh fruit and vegetables in one town? Vendors at a new Yellow Springs farmers’ market think not, and they aim to give shoppers more variety by opening in the Corner Cone parking lot on Saturdays, just down the street from the farmers’ market at Kings Yard. Both markets open on May 2 and will continue Saturday mornings from 7 to 11:30 a.m. through the summer.

  • Saving the planet, a house at a time

    Local residents Bob Brecha, right, and Dan Rudolf, second from right, are starting netØhome, a new business that provides home energy audits. Shown at left is Mark Campbell, who will do the audits, and center, Libby Rudolf, who handles graphic design and support services. The business kicks off with a celebration this Saturday, April 18, at 7 p.m. at The Emporium.

    Most people want their homes to be more energy efficient, Bob Brecha and Dan Rudolf believe, but they just don’t know how to make the needed changes. “People don’t know where to start,” Brecha said in a recent interview.

  • Brother Bear brews cup of kindness

    Patrick (aka “Brother Bear”) and Mindy Harney recently sat with their children, from left, Gracie, Elesha, Sophie and Molly on the steps outside Brother Bear’s Café, 118 Dayton Street. The café will be celebrating its grand opening Friday–Monday, April 17–20.

    “Last call on espresso bar!” That’s what patrons will typically hear just before closing time at Brother Bear’s Café, the new coffeehouse located at 118 Dayton Street (formerly the site of the Epic Book Shop). To know how the coffeehouse came to be (and how it almost never was) adds a unique cocoa-mocha twist to […]

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