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Business Section :: Page 3

  • Investors buy former Creative Memories building


    A group of California-based investors purchased the former Creative Memories building last month and have already found three potential occupants who show “substantial interest” in leasing the available space.

  • New Mills lawn will feature a hotel, cafe and banquet hall


    A new Mills Park Hotel, in the image of this former Mills home, is planned for the Barr property next year.

  • Council slows CBE funding decision making


    At their Nov. 4 meeting, Village Council members agreed to slow down a decision on whether to provide about $700,000 in funding for the Center for Business and Education, or CBE.

  • New café opens at the Oten

    Matthew Willis and Gregg Pastorelle will open Aleta’s Cafe in the Oten Gallery on Xenia Avenue next spring, with occassional hours until then. Willis and Pastorelle, who have worked in local restaurants and played together in local heavy-metal bands, hope the panini sandwiches, Naan bread pizzas and salads in their music-themed restaurant appeal to a local crowd. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Good, simple food is the promise of a new restaurant opening here next year.
    Aleta’s Café, in the Oten Gallery, 303 Xenia Ave., will serve hot panini sandwiches, pizzas made with naan bread and elaborate salads for lunch and dinner.

  • Yellow Springs business EnviroFlight on CNN soon

    Local business EnviroFlight and its founder, Glen Courtright, shown above, have been featured recently in several national news stories.

    Local business EnviroFlight and its founder, Glen Courtright, are the focus of several news stories by national media, including National Public Radio’s “All Things Considered,” and CNN’s “Erin Burnett OutFront,” to air next week.

  • The new Little Art Theatre takes a bow

    Little Art Theatre Executive Director Jenny Cowperthwaite welcomes theatergoers into the new lobby of the renovated theater, which will be open to the community during an open house from 3 to 9 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 28. During the first complete renovation in the Little Art’s 84-year history, the theater was closed for the last five months and upgraded with a digital projector and surround-sound system, new cushioned seats, handicapped-accessible bathrooms and a spacious lobby, among other changes. After the open house, the theater begins a 12-day “Back to the Movies” film festival. Regular programming resumes on Friday, Oct. 11. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    This has been a “repair to remember” for the Little Art Theatre. Over the last five months, a half-million dollar renovation has transformed the 84-year-old theater from a relic of the 35-millimeter film era to a state-of-the-art, fully-digital and accessible movie house.

  • Going public about B.O., naturally

    An organic, locally made deoderant that works is now available for retail in the village.

    Adriene Kramer has found a product that works to deodorize without harmful chemicals — it’s one she makes herself.

  • Little Art news: the good, the bad and the unreported

    Jenny Cowperthwaite-Ruka waits with the rest of the village for her theater, whose reopening date is still a few months away.

    The Little Art Theatre’s renovations are close to completion, but it will be some time before the theater opens again.

  • Getting from waste to want not

    The busy bugs of EnviroFlight are churning out a new product this year — a natural fertilizer that some say is making area tomato plants grow like weeds.

  • A passion for 1950s-era furniture

    When Atomic Fox owner Terry Fox spent weekends with his grandparents as a child, he didn’t expect those experiences to fuel a lifelong interest.