Economy Section :: Page 29

  • With assistance, business can thrive in Yellow Springs

    According to the most recent business survey update sponsored by Yellow Springs Community Resources, the village is a pretty good place to do business. Business owners like the village’s location, personality and walkability, and even in a slumped economy, a number of local outfits plan to expand here. But business owners also perceive barriers to growth, including the cost of doing business in the village, the lackluster appearance of the central business district and the age-old concern with lack of parking space downtown.

  • New economic position filled

    Sarah Wildman was hired by the Village as economic sustainability coordinator.

    At the Nov. 16 Village Council meeting, Village Manager Mark Cundiff announced that the Village has hired Sarah Wildman as its new economic sustainability coordinator.

    “She has a great deal of experience in economic development in a small community as well as a background in the arts,” Cundiff said in an interview on Tuesday. “She’ll bring a lot of energy to the job.”

  • Home, Inc. has option on Rabbit Run

    The historically green space at Rabbit Run farm that is alternately high-touch vegetable garden and brambly wildbrush, home to fox, deer and, of course, lots of rabbits, may be in for a change. Last month, Home, Inc. bought an option to purchase the 7.5-acre farm on Dayton Street to accommodate what the housing group hopes will be its first mixed-income, energy-efficient development project.

  • Take a tour of the village greens

    The retrofitted Dayton Street home of Bob Brecha and Kaethi Seidl and their children, Regina, left, and Francesca Brecha includes the same green technologies as three other village dwellings included in this Saturday’s National Solar Tour, a nationwide event to help people learn about living with energy-saving technologies. For more information, go to www.greenenergyohio.org.

    Can a home be built to absorb enough of the sun’s heat so that it requires no heat source — other than the presence of people and the heat they produce by inhabiting space and cooking? Can an old home be retrofitted or remodeled with the hopes of realizing the cost of investment through monthly energy savings? Does making more sustainable decisions about energy use have to mean being less comfortable?

  • Anthrotech to measure Army

    For getting precise measurements of the human body, no anthropologists in the country are more highly specialized than those at Anthrotech. That is likely the reason the U.S. Army chose the Yellow Springs outfit last month to complete the task of obtaining a statistical sample of the physical proportions of its soldiers.

  • Council considers new group with economic advisory role

    At their Sept. 8 meeting, members of Village Council continued an earlier discussion regarding how the Village should best approach economic development. At issue was a motion by Council President Judith Hempfling that Council establish an economic sustainability committee. Council did not take action at the meeting due to concerns from Council members Kathryn Van der Heiden and Karen Wintrow that Council’s new economic sustainability staff person, who has not yet been hired, should be on the job before an advisory group is established.

  • Yellow Springs as retreat for women

    The local artist and new business owner is working to make sure that desire becomes a reality with Getaways for Women, a retreat service that she hopes will introduce area women to the village’s many resources.

    With all the abundance and richness in town, “I’m like a connector,” Mellon said. “I’m a local host.”

  • Rita Caz store glitters and grows

    When Rita Caz Jewelry Gallery moved in April from its cozy yet too-small abode in the corner of Kings Yard to a roomier space next door, it was more than a relocation. It was an upgrade.

  • Fine local wines, engineered to taste

    In June Jim Brandeberry and his family opened Brandeberry Winery on their 10-acre farm on W. Jackson Road in Enon. Four miles from Yellow Springs, the winery is the closest producer of chardonnays, cabernets and sweeter berry wines within 40 miles of town.

    Most first-time visits to the new Brandeberry Winery in Enon include a tour of the production room simply because everyone wants to know — how does one make good wine from grapes grown in Ohio? A recent customer, who drove through fields of nine-foot corn last week to get to the 5118 W. Jackson Road farm, wasn’t leaving without the secret to the sauce.

  • Duckwall buys gallery space

    Longtime Yellow Springs chiropractor Mark Duckwall has recently purchased the building that formerly housed the Shirley/Jones Gallery, where he plans to open a new office space this fall.

Weather forecast by WP Wunderground & Denver Snow Service