Economy Section :: Page 32

  • School board projects loss

    In the public portion of the April 23 school board meeting, board members discussed reductions and additions to the 2009–2010 school year budget and the second revision of next year’s district education plan. Reporting a projected five-year deficit of $400,000 to $500,000, Joy Kitzmiller distributed a list of 2009–2010 budget modifications that reflect personnel and service changes at Mills Lawn, McKinney, and the Yellow Springs High School.

  • A decade of service—Home, Inc. builds diversity, stability

    Yellow Springs native Tawn Jackson Singh moved into her first home in Yellow Springs with her husband Jai Singh in November 2008, thanks to support from Home, Inc. Tawn is a new member of the Home, Inc. board, which marks its 10th anniversary this year.

    In terms of social memory, Yellow Springs has much to draw from recent history, including the coming together for Antioch College’s revival, the public effort to save Whitehall Farm, and the effort to prevent sprawl from developing on the west edge of town. A social memory of common experiences and struggles creates the kind of community that can weather political storms, according to local resident Don Hollister, and that is the kind of community he wants to support.

  • Local economic development efforts—Focus is arts, tourism, commerce park

    On Monday, May 4, Village Council will continue a conversation it began in early April on how best to move forward with economic development. One of Council’s six 2009 Village goals is to “establish a plan that improves the economic condition of the community.”

  • Farmers corner new market

    Can there ever be too much locally grown, fresh fruit and vegetables in one town? Vendors at a new Yellow Springs farmers’ market think not, and they aim to give shoppers more variety by opening in the Corner Cone parking lot on Saturdays, just down the street from the farmers’ market at Kings Yard. Both markets open on May 2 and will continue Saturday mornings from 7 to 11:30 a.m. through the summer.

  • Saving the planet, a house at a time

    Local residents Bob Brecha, right, and Dan Rudolf, second from right, are starting netØhome, a new business that provides home energy audits. Shown at left is Mark Campbell, who will do the audits, and center, Libby Rudolf, who handles graphic design and support services. The business kicks off with a celebration this Saturday, April 18, at 7 p.m. at The Emporium.

    Most people want their homes to be more energy efficient, Bob Brecha and Dan Rudolf believe, but they just don’t know how to make the needed changes. “People don’t know where to start,” Brecha said in a recent interview.

  • Council begins talk on economic development

    Should the Village of Yellow Springs move ahead quickly to hire an economic development staff person, or should Council members take the time to clarify, with the community, what sort of development they want before hiring someone?

  • Brother Bear brews cup of kindness

    Patrick (aka “Brother Bear”) and Mindy Harney recently sat with their children, from left, Gracie, Elesha, Sophie and Molly on the steps outside Brother Bear’s Café, 118 Dayton Street. The café will be celebrating its grand opening Friday–Monday, April 17–20.

    “Last call on espresso bar!” That’s what patrons will typically hear just before closing time at Brother Bear’s Café, the new coffeehouse located at 118 Dayton Street (formerly the site of the Epic Book Shop). To know how the coffeehouse came to be (and how it almost never was) adds a unique cocoa-mocha twist to […]

  • Small businesses weather economy

    The health of the local economy is tied not only to the village’s largest employers, but also to the many smaller ones that together contribute substantially to Village coffers. With the many entrepreneurs educated at Antioch College, Yellow Springs has a rich legacy of fostering start-ups, and that small-business diversity is a critical part of the stability of the local economy, according to Village Manager Mark Cundiff.

  • Vernay Foundation dissolved

    The Vernay Foundation, which funded the building of the library, the Community Children’s Center, the Friends Care Community and many other projects in the village, officially dissolved on Dec. 31, 2008. Recalling its roots, the foundation donated the remainder of the fund to its first recipient, the Children’s Center.

  • Stutzman’s future uncertain

    In a bad economy, few businesses hurt like landscapers, and Stutzman’s Nursery, Garden Center & Landscaping is no exception. After several years of struggle to pay bills on time and maintain proper insurance, at the beginning of March the Village issued Stutzman’s an order to vacate the Village-owned property on U.S. 68 north.