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Jan
28
2015
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Economy Section :: Page 4

  • Coming home, but not for the jobs

    THUMB_Print

    The high point of the Yellow Springs economy, like that of much of the rest of the nation, seems to have been during the post-World War II boom years of the 1950s and 60s. The town’s four small industries — Morris Bean, Vernay, YSI and Antioch Bookplate — employed hundreds of workers each, Antioch College was going strong, and small research firms — the Fels Lab and Kettering Research Institute, among others — fed off the college’s intellectual vitality.

  • Village economy: good, bad news

    THUMB_Print

    The Village of Yellow Springs government hasn’t generally involved itself in the local economy, but over the past 10 years, the Village has gotten increasingly active in supporting the local business community.

  • Yellow Springs downtown business mostly steady

    THUMB_Economy

    When it comes to surviving as a business in downtown Yellow Springs, not all outfits are the same. The various successes and challenges of each seem to relate more to the practices of the shop owners and the pressures within each merchandising industry, rather than the common location at the hub of the village.

  • Local Yellow Springs businesses hold steady

    THUMB_Economy

    While the top five businesses in Yellow Springs generate about a third of the Village’s total income tax revenue, dozens of smaller businesses together contribute a significant portion of the total.

  • EnviroFlight, Antioch College seek partnership

    THUMB_Print

    Antioch College and the local sustainable animal feed business EnviroFlight are poised to collaborate in a way that leaders believe will benefit both entities.

  • Local business rebounding

    THUMB_Print

    Local businesses appear to be recovering and returning the Village to pre-2009 tax revenue levels, according to data from the Regional Income Tax Agency, or RITA.

  • CBE project delayed for now

    THUMB_Print

    In an unexpected development, Village Council on Monday night withdrew an ordinance to fund the CBE infrastructure due to procedural errors.

  • Enviroflight, college collaborate on project

    Enviroflight and Antioch College may collaborate on a project to benefit both entities. In the photo, Enviroflight President Glen Courtright is shown being filmed by a CNN cameraman for a segment on that network last fall.

    Antioch College and the local food sustainability business Enviroflight are poised to collaborate on a project that leaders believe will benefit both entities.

  • Viability of CBE challenged in meeting

    THUMB_Print

    The current landscape of commercial real estate building and lending was the focal point at an informational forum on public funding for the CBE infrastructure last Thursday night, and several professionals in the field urged Council not to put money into the project.

  • Epic Books returns to downtown Yellow Springs

    Gail Lichtenfels reopened Epic Book Shop as a used bookstore last month after closing the longtime Dayton Street bookstore in 2009. At the new Epic, located at 229 Xenia Ave. in the space vacated last summer by the Main Squeeze juice bar, Lichtenfels will buy and sell used books on all topics but especially in the fields of religion, philosophy, psychology and mysticism. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    In the decades-long saga of Epic Book Shop, an improbable resurrection — 40 years after Gail Lichtenfels first bought it and four years after she shuttered it, Lichtenfels reopened Epic last month as a used bookstore.