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From The Print Section :: Page 13

  • Overbid postpones streetscape work


    The downtown streetscape project scheduled to start on the west side of Xenia Avenue this summer has been postponed until the spring of 2016. According to Village Manager Patti Bates, the project’s construction bid was higher than the Village budget allowed, and the project will be rebid next spring.

  • A choir’s joyful sounds for the Earth

    The World House Choir is rehearsing Paul Winter’s Missa Gaia for a local performance Friday and Saturday, Sept. 11 and 12, at 7 p.m. at the Antioch College Amphitheatre. Above, from left are basses Lucas Bautista (obscured), Ron Siemer, Frank Fortino, Nick Daily and David Seitz. (Submitted Photo by Liz Mersky)

    Local resident Cathy Roma believes that singing through the body about sacred ideas brings them alive and helps them to manifest.

  • Anita J. (Taylor) Sanderson


    Anita J. (Taylor) Sanderson, 85, of Xenia, formerly of Yellow Springs, passed away Monday, Aug. 31, 2015, at Hospice of Dayton.

  • Art House-Hop returns

    Painting by Cassandra Gillens from Jim and Betty Felder’s collection. Gillens is a self-taught artist from the Gullah community of South Carolina who has exhibited widely in the United States and overseas.

    Betty and Jim Felder never set out to collect art. “We just bought things we liked and enjoyed,” Betty said. “And could afford!”

  • Brewery pauses to expand

    Nate Cornett and Lisa Wolters, owners of Yellow Springs Brewery, temporarily shut down production this month for an expansion that will allow them to brew fives times as much craft beer as they were this past year, their second year in business. They will soon move nine 30-barrel stainless steel brew tanks from storage at the former Creative Memories building to the brewery at MillWorks. (Photo by Lauren Heaton)

    Yellow Springs Brewery has a habit of being ahead of its time. When the craft brewery opened in the village in the spring of 2013, there were just a handful of small brewers in the Dayton region.

  • Block by block, summer’s last hurrah plays out

    Toby Cromer ate his greens at the Kingsfield Court block party.

    The Human Relations Commission has sponsored 15 block parties this summer.

  • Council moves on policing


    At their Aug. 24 meeting, Village Council members agreed to move forward in addressing concerns regarding local police and the community.

  • To him, pastoring is personal

    Pastor Rick Jones stands outside the Yellow Springs United Methodist Church, where he is the new pastor. “You have to pray outside the box,” he said, in order to meet people where they are and help them move forward. His experience in social services informs his goals as pastor. (Photo by Dylan Taylor-Lehman)

    “You have to think and pray outside of the box,” said Pastor Rick Jones, the new pastor at Yellow Springs United Methodist Church. He prefers to operate outside the box because he knows all parishioners are not the same, and his pastoral MO is to serve people on a more personal basis.

  • An actor’s mystery, a puzzle of a play


    Imagine this: theater production where you are given a script moments before you are thrust on stage, alone. There are few props to hide behind, only a table and two cups of water, and the performance requires that you act out whatever the script commands.

  • Spokespersons

    Dan Carrigan and Jerry Papania bike to work from the village. (photo by Lauren Heaton)

    Biking to work.