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From The Print Section :: Page 143

  • May 31, 2012 Bulldog Sports Round-up

    YSHS junior Angela Allen launched the discus 10 feet further than she did at regionals last year, but still came up short of qualifying for the Division III state finals. Allen’s best toss of 102’11” earned her ninth place at regionals. Visit www.ysnews.com for more photos from the meet. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    May 31, 2012 Bulldog Sports Round-up

  • YSHS athlete jumps up to state

    Last weekend Antone Truss became the first YSHS high jumper to qualify for the Ohio High School Division III Track & Field Championships in more than 25 years. The senior seemingly defied gravity during the regional meet as he cleared 6’2’’ to secure his position at states and then conquered heights up to 6’6’’ to finish as the regional runner-up. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    High jumper Antone Truss once again raised the bar by becoming the first Bulldog high jumper to qualify for the state meet in more than 25 years.

  • New holiday arts event this year

    When Glen Helen announced last fall that it would discontinue its Nature Arts and Crafts Show, plans were made for a new collaborative show.

  • Arts community, arts policy

    Village Council members and local artists and arts supporters this week began a dialogue on the arts and a potential Village government arts policy at Council’s regular May 21 meeting.

  • Karen Wintrow honored— A local and regional thinker

    Village Council member Karen Wintrow received the Miami Valley Regional Planning Commission’s annual Regional Stewardship Award last month. An MVRPC board and committee member, Wintrow received the award because of her efforts to improve the Dayton region and because she’s a “regional thinker.” (Submitted photo)

    When Karen Wintrow isn’t thinking about Yellow Springs, she’s thinking about the Dayton region. For that work, Wintrow received the group’s annual Regional Stewardship Award last month.

  • School board business— More interdisciplinary options coming soon

    At the Yellow Springs school board May 17 meeting, School District Superintendent Mario Basora announced that shifts in staffing at the YSHS/McKinney Middle School next year will allow for more advanced placement and interdisciplinary opportunities.

  • More YSHS athletes college-bound

    YSHS senior athletes going on to play in college are, from left, Antone Truss (track), Elizabeth Malone (swimming), Erika Chick (swimming), Jacob Trumbull (soccer) and Jake Fugate (football). Not pictured is Greg Felder Jr. (basketball). (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    The game goes on for six Yellow Springs High School senior athletes who will play their sport at college next year.

  • Arts Council brings back classes

    Margrit Tydings-Petrie will teach art classes on creating papier-mâché puppets from 2 to 4 p.m. on Saturday, May 26, and Saturday, June 2, at the Arts Council’s new space at 111 Corry Street. Tydings-Petrie’s “Wanna Mache?” workshops are connected to her exhibit at the Arts Council gallery, “Dancing with the Universe: Masks and Beyond,” and are part of a revived effort at the Arts Council to provide community arts education. (Photo by Megan Bachman)

    Having organized art classes for much of its 40-year history, the Yellow Springs Arts Council is rebooting its educational workshops with a series beginning this week.

  • Plan dropped; wellhead likely safe

    Sometime in 1988, a host of volatile organic chemicals were found deep in the aquifer that feeds the Village’s municipal drinking water wells. Around the same time, the federal government mandated safeguarding the quality of the groundwater.

  • Borer likely dooms ash trees

    Nick Boutis, director of Glen Helen, last week identified some of the ash trees downtown, including this large ash outside the Jackson Lytle and Lewis Funeral Home on Xenia Avenue. The trees are at risk from the Emerald Ash Borer, and experts believe that if the insects ­ — which have killed millions of trees in Michigan and Ohio — aren’t already in the village, they will be soon. (Photo by Diane Chiddister)

    Many majestic canopy trees around the village are ash trees. And if they’re not already infested with the Emerald Ash Borer beetle, they will be soon. Within a few years, they’ll be dead.